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Old 07-06-2012, 06:51 PM   #341 
Olympia
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Also, do people have trouble feeding them? Mine immediately started swimming around chomping on anything they saw. Mostly plant debris from rearranging. -sigh-
They are pretty chubby. And one has some skin hanging from his belly, I hope that's okay. Like he didn't shed in one piece.
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Old 07-06-2012, 07:02 PM   #342 
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Colleen - Congrats on your new froggies and mossball! They all look absolutley ADORABLE! Do they have names yet? Mossballs are awesome, and need very much of anything to thrive, so I'm sure it will do well for you.

You mentioned that you have 0 on nitrAtes, as well as the other two. This makes me a bit nervous, as it is usually indicative of a tank that hasn't been cycled yet. You'll want to pay very close attention over the next few weeks as your nitrogen cycle establishes, and do water changes as needed to keep ammonia and nitrIte levels down for the health of your frogs (For the health of your creatures, ammonia and nitrIte should be at 0, nitrAte should be under 20 or so). Unless you keep a small uncycled tank - I'm assuming Frank is a Betta? I don't *think* the betta can pick up any illnesses from the frogs, so you should be all right there, but the two species don't always play nice together, so be sure to watch closely until you're sure.



Your froggies DO look super chubby and healthily adorable!

i had thought the cycle was complete b/c the nitrates and nitrites were zero. was i wrong? what would they be if the cycle is complete? i have live plants which i thought helped with keeping it healthy. i have not named them b/c i cannot tell them apart. Yes, Frank is my Betta. i wanted to let the frogs take over their own tank for a few days before adding Frank, so he is not territorial with them. Well, i don't know how he will be but want to reduce any problems that may arise)

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Old 07-06-2012, 07:39 PM   #343 
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Here's a link to the beginner's guide to cycling. It will probably be able to explain things much better than I can!

Basically; fish, food, and plant wastes create ammonia - which is toxic to fish/frogs
A bacteria forms that converts the ammonia into nitrItes - which is ALSO toxic to fish/frogs
A bacteria THEN forms that converts the nitrItes into nitrAtes - which is NOT toxic to fish/frogs until it reaches VERY high levels.

In a fully cycled tank you should see:
Ammonia: 0 ppm
NitrIte: 0 ppm
NitrAte: usually between 7.5-20ppm (this TOTALLY depends on tank size/stocking)

As this cycle establishes in your tank, it is very unsafe for the creatures that live there. First the ammonia will 'spike' as the levels of wastes in the tank rise with nothing to stop it (be sure to do plenty of water changes to keep this number down for the frogs). When the next stage of the cycle begins, the ammonia will start to vanish, but the nitrIte levels will spike (be sure to do plenty of water changes to keep this number down for the frogs) Finally, at the last stage, the nitrAte levels will spike as the nitrIte levels fall. . . (again with the water changes), and finally, the nitrAtes will settle where they need to be to keep a balance in your tank, giving you a 0 reading on ammonia and nitrIte - and a low reading of nitrAtes.

Live plants WILL and DO help with keeping things in check during cycling. They absorb the poisonous toxins from the water and convert it into their own food - so yay for live plants! But you'd need to have a LOT of live plants to absorb all of the nitrate in a fully cycled tank.

There are many people around who can explain this stuff far better than I can! Check out that link, and hopefully one of them will pop by to help out soon! In the meantime, keep testing and if your levels start to rise, keep them down with water changes.

Out of curiosity, what size is the tank and how long has it been set up? Many people choose not to cycle smaller tanks, and prefer doing complete water changes every so often. This isn't my way, though, so maybe someone can help you there if that's the way you want to go.

Good call on adding Frank later, hopefully they'll get along swimmingly! And I'm sure you'll be able to tell your froggies apart soon! Can't wait to hear what names they get!
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Old 07-06-2012, 07:50 PM   #344 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chesherca View Post
Here's a link to the beginner's guide to cycling. It will probably be able to explain things much better than I can!

Basically; fish, food, and plant wastes create ammonia - which is toxic to fish/frogs
A bacteria forms that converts the ammonia into nitrItes - which is ALSO toxic to fish/frogs
A bacteria THEN forms that converts the nitrItes into nitrAtes - which is NOT toxic to fish/frogs until it reaches VERY high levels.

In a fully cycled tank you should see:
Ammonia: 0 ppm
NitrIte: 0 ppm
NitrAte: usually between 7.5-20ppm (this TOTALLY depends on tank size/stocking)

As this cycle establishes in your tank, it is very unsafe for the creatures that live there. First the ammonia will 'spike' as the levels of wastes in the tank rise with nothing to stop it (be sure to do plenty of water changes to keep this number down for the frogs). When the next stage of the cycle begins, the ammonia will start to vanish, but the nitrIte levels will spike (be sure to do plenty of water changes to keep this number down for the frogs) Finally, at the last stage, the nitrAte levels will spike as the nitrIte levels fall. . . (again with the water changes), and finally, the nitrAtes will settle where they need to be to keep a balance in your tank, giving you a 0 reading on ammonia and nitrIte - and a low reading of nitrAtes.

Live plants WILL and DO help with keeping things in check during cycling. They absorb the poisonous toxins from the water and convert it into their own food - so yay for live plants! But you'd need to have a LOT of live plants to absorb all of the nitrate in a fully cycled tank.

There are many people around who can explain this stuff far better than I can! Check out that link, and hopefully one of them will pop by to help out soon! In the meantime, keep testing and if your levels start to rise, keep them down with water changes.

Out of curiosity, what size is the tank and how long has it been set up? Many people choose not to cycle smaller tanks, and prefer doing complete water changes every so often. This isn't my way, though, so maybe someone can help you there if that's the way you want to go.

Good call on adding Frank later, hopefully they'll get along swimmingly! And I'm sure you'll be able to tell your froggies apart soon! Can't wait to hear what names they get!
Thanks i thought i was good at cycling, but did not realize the nitrates would be above zero. yes i will do daily water changes. it is a 10 gallon. i used fish food instead of fish or ammonia.
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Old 07-06-2012, 08:27 PM   #345 
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Ahhh, gotcha! It's an easy mistake to make until you understand the full process. I hope I helped clarify it for you! You did better than I did when I started, believe me - I didn't even know there WAS a nitrogen cycle! With a lot of care and attention, and help from the fantastic people on this site, my first froggy (along with a slew of fishies) got through it just fine.

You'll be best off cycling the 10g tank, and as long as you keep an eye on things, I'm sure everyone will get through safely. The trouble with doing a fish-in (or in this case, a frog-in) cycle, is that you HAVE to have some level of ammonia in the water in order for the cycle to run it's course - which obviously isn't the greatest for their health. Just keep a close watch on things - you may or may not have to do a water change EVERY day. It really depends on what the levels are reading. I'd say two juvie frogs in a 10g is pretty lightly stocked, and with the plants lending a helping hand, you should be able to rock this cycle with very little impact on the inhabitants - as long as you pay attention.

Keep us posted on how it goes, and again - congrats on the new frogs!!! *luffs frogs*
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Old 07-06-2012, 08:35 PM   #346 
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thanks i will def keep and eye on things. the frogs have been eating so i am happy. i might have given them enough bloodworms to keep the cycle going. thawed frozen type.
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Old 07-06-2012, 09:12 PM   #347 
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Hahaha! I have NEVER met a frog who doesn't love bloodworm! I'm sure you'll have no problems with keeping the cycle going now that you have critters in there. Your little froggies look plump, healthy, and happy :)
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Old 07-07-2012, 06:48 AM   #348 
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Thanks! they all made it thru the night, so i'm happy. the bloodworms that were on the substrate last night, are now all gone, i feel confident they ate them all.

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Old 07-07-2012, 07:50 AM   #349 
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Olympia -

Sorry, hon! I missed this one!!!

Some people have trouble feeding them, yes - but in an environment where they feel comfortable (like your pretty, cycled, well-planted tank) I don't think you'll have any trouble! It *does* seem odd that they'd be chewing on the plants, but if it was debris on the substrate they probably just thought it was a snack (and were disappointed!) The trouble with feeding these guys comes especially in a community tank, because the poor little things have TERRIBLE vision - they hunt by feeling for vibrations in the water (which does them no good since we feed them dead food) and by using their sense of smell. It can take them quite a long time to find food - and you'll see them randomly pouncing all over the place until they do. In a community tank with greedier fish, this can be a problem, as the food is often eaten by the time they get to it!

It sounds like yours have settled in perfectly, and I'm sure they'll do wonderfully in your care!

As for the shedding. . . keep an eye on it. It's probably fine, they usually shed all at once, but it isn't uncommon for a piece to get stuck a bit longer. If it takes him longer than a couple of days, it *could* be indicative of a problem, (for example, Chytrid - where the skin gets thicker, and so doesn't shed smoothly) - so you'll want to keep your eye on it. I LOVE watching my froggies shed, it's the coolest thing - but they usually do it in the middle of the night, and I miss it!



Colleen -

HUZZAH for day TWO! They're so sweet! Great shot!

It's REALLY hard to tell from the picture, and depending on how young they are - may be too soon to tell, anyway - but it looks as if you *might* have a male and a female there! Females tend to be chubbier, and have a bit more of a 'tail' while the males are thinner have a small white or pinkish ‘pimple’ on their side, just behind their armpit. It’s called a post-axillary subdermal gland - and I *think* I might be able to see one on the smaller guy in this picture?

Glad to hear they're eating! As they get more comfortable with you and their new home, they'll start coming out and begging for their dinner. It's always good to try to make a point of watching them eat. That's the best way to be sure that they're both getting enough - and this will become especially important when you put your Betta in with them.
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Old 07-07-2012, 08:23 AM   #350 
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Gah, the C word. :(
I don't think they'll have any problems eating, I have a tendency to pick timid small fish. When I walk up to this tank everything swims away. xD
Them and the gobies both need a bloodworm diet but they are twice the size of the gobies. xD
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