Betta Fish Care  
Go Back   Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care > Betta Chat
Check out the eBook Betta Fish Care Made Easy
betta fish
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-02-2011, 09:01 AM   #21 
tracyalexa
Member
 
tracyalexa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
I see how Thailand breeders keep them and there aren't any 10 gal, 5 gal set ups. They are in small little containers, enough to swim around and be active. That's it. Obviously, they are healthy and fine. I believe it's personal preference mixed with some common sense. You don't want them in anything less than a gallon just because, it's so extra tiny and I think all those water changes would be stressful to the fish.
tracyalexa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 09:05 AM   #22 
lyle
New Member
 
lyle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
I would like to weigh in even though I am a only couple of months into keeping my first fish. That being said, I have done alot of reading about betta fish and fish keeping in general.
I once read what someone wrote in relation to betta fish keeping and how owners far too often anthropomorphize their fish which leads to blanket statements and these unconfirmed requirements. Either these fish really are more complex or the information is really driven to to make people money. Always follow the dollar. You will always need a bigger tank, better filter, better heater etc. and will always have to pay someone for these things.
I have read stories of bettas living in their cups and lasting a couple of years. But like many people say here, it's enough for them to survive, the goal is for them to thrive.
I just assume that the 2.5 gallon min. requirement is the consensus based on the experience of many betta fish keepers, breeders etc. who see betta everyday and who have a lot of knowledge into their habits and behaviours.
The fact that these fish respond to stress and can learn behaviours( ie. signal for feeding time) makes me think there is more to them than meets the eye. Fish, like people, have different personalities as well. It's just fascinating. Anyways, that's what I think about it.
lyle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 09:14 AM   #23 
SnowySurface
Member
 
SnowySurface's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Bay Shore, NY
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tikibirds View Post
I would like to know where the scientific research is behind this claim or did someone at some point in the past decided on this and people just stuck with it. I had a guy that was in horrible shape, missing fins, no color, ammonia burns and fin rot. He came from walmart and I got a 1 gallon triangle shaped tank set up for $11. I wasnt gonna pay more since I wasnt sure he was gonna live. Well not only did he live, but he totally recovered in that tiny 1 gallon. Eventually he got upgraded to a 5 gallon with a heater.

My point is, if small tanks are so horrible, then why did he recover?

Personally, I like to give them at least 3 gallons, more room for them to swim and more room for decorations and a heater.
He recovered in the 1 gallon because that is a good size for a hospital tank. You were also keeping the water very clean and healthy for him, so his health was able to improve. Small tanks are great for treating illness, but they can cause illness if they aren't maintained properly. So 1 gallons are good for a week or two of QT, but I wouldn't suggest it for permanant housing unless you want to do water changes constantly.

I personally like 5 gallon tanks just because I know a tank that size can hold a cycle. So I'm glad I was able to upgrade to a larger tank. My fish were healthy in their 1 gallon set up and never got so much as fin rot for 1 year (Snowy) or 2 years (Luigi) in my set up. So I can definitely see what you are saying. It does feel like I upgrader my tanks to fix something that wasn't broke in the first place. But I know my fish are happier with more room even if they were healthy before. There is a difference between living and surviving. :)
SnowySurface is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2011, 11:23 PM   #24 
purplemuffin
Member
 
purplemuffin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Central Texas
I think another reason 2.5 is considered minimum is you REALLY don't want to heat anything smaller than that. Too unstable--really easy to have temperature fluctations resulting in a cooked fish! And..most people need heaters to be honest
purplemuffin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2011, 05:08 AM   #25 
HatsuneMiku
Member
 
HatsuneMiku's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: ♥ so kali ♥
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tikibirds View Post
I wasnt gonna pay more since I wasnt sure he was gonna live. Well not only did he live, but he totally recovered in that tiny 1 gallon. Eventually he got upgraded to a 5 gallon with a heater.

My point is, if small tanks are so horrible, then why did he recover?

Personally, I like to give them at least 3 gallons, more room for them to swim and more room for decorations and a heater.
this is exactly how most people get into this hobby .. they don't know if their betta will live .. and most people start off with smaller sized tanks because they thought it's easier or were mis-directed from mis-information given to them at the store .. then after buying .. they realize how much work it is to maintain a small sized tank .. as what snowy said +1 .. ur betta recovered because you took care of him in his 1g .. and he was giving good conditions to live on .. and you eventually upgraded to a 5g as his perm home .. which is what i wish all betta's could live this way

@op
breeders on the other hand .. have a different scenario and environment .. breeders cup their strong fry or put growing bettas in barricks and they have a system in how to keep water clean and warm .. with the hope of knowing that the bettas will be re-homed and will go into a perm home that's has proper living environments (like eventually a 5g .. as with tiki's experience)

1g is not horrible living conditions .. if you know what your doing .. have the time to do the water changes .. and can heat it properly .. but most people don't know when they first start out .. which is why they are here on a betta forum so that they can know =) isn't it? .. or if they already do know (or think they know) .. they wouldn't be here seeking for help and advice .. =D
HatsuneMiku is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2011, 11:11 AM   #26 
Myates
Member
 
Myates's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Some people just believe their way is the best way.. when in reality, there are many, many different ways that are all good. I have to agree with some that have mentioned it's the care of the fish, rather then the size of their tanks that matter. Yes, I will recommend at least 1 gal, but I can't say someone is a bad owner for having them in a half gallon, as long as the proper water changes are being made, and the temp is correct.
It's like with just about any animal that people buy that are in pet stores - ohh poor puppy is in a small cage, oh that snake needs a bigger tank, etc.. you feel bad for them living in unfavorable conditions you want to take them home to give them something bigger, better.. just some people are a little overzealous when it comes to the care of the animal.

Example: Our dog eats Blue Buffalo, one of the top brands, expensive, has pretty much the best formula out there. Rarely will get table scraps, is trained in every way you can think of. Heck, drop a steak in front of her and she'll look at you until you say "ok". She has made maybe 2 mistakes in the house in her life, she's been with my bf from the age of 8 weeks, and she's a little over 2 years old now, so even as a puppy she was properly trained. She is the perfect weight, up to date on all her shots, tagged, chipped and get regular grooming, including nails trimmed at least every month. She is the most gentle dog around children and is very happy and will greet anyone with a tail wag and dance. She's half black lab, half border collie. Anyways point is- my bf will sometimes visit a lab forum to see if anything new is going on in the breed world.. you know how many times he has been told that he is taking bad care of his dog? He LOVES his pets, he keeps them for their full, long lives and will give them the best, healthiest of lives.
But some people say he should be feeding her raw meat, cooked meat, that she doesn't go out to the bathroom on a set schedule, etc. That he only feeds her the recommended amount of food per day that the vet recommended, and the breed(s) need. But some say it's not enough..

Some people can be extremists when it comes to their animals, and they are stubborn and think all should be the same, when in fact what is good for some, isn't good for others. I know one of my boys prefers the 1 gal over the larger sizes. But that does not mean I am not giving him the best.

Okay.. I think I just kept on typing and typing.. sorry! I'm a little out of it right now lol
Myates is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2011, 07:01 PM   #27 
Fleetwood
New Member
 
Fleetwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: MN, eh?
I agree, it depends on whether or not the person knows what they're doing with their animal, and a bigger tank does not guarantee a healthy fish by any means. I personally, have been able to keep Bettas in one gallon in perfectly fine health, so long as I kept an eye on temperature fluctuations and gave him/her a stimulating environment, I don't think this made me a bad pet owner whatsoever, and like someone else said, people are often "extremists" or they invest in the animal more as a hobby than a companion. Taking into account the textbook mechanics and not the relationship one has with a creature. I know that I cannot bond with a fish like I could a cat, dog or reptile, but I observe him every day. Outsiders do not. So long as the person is doing the best they believe to be possible and the health isn't compromised, you're still a good pet owner in my book, ill informed perhaps, but not awful, not cruel, not any of that.
Fleetwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2011, 06:42 AM   #28 
Bellus Bellator
New Member
 
Bellus Bellator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
I've only had my fish for a month so I'm certainly never going to pass judgement on others,especially on a forum like this were being here alone displays that you're a loving owner. Personally I've never understood the tank size argument,I do believe that it shouldn't be under 2.5g because of the old rule of 1g to 1 inch of fish,having said that though environment will always be more important than space,that's how professional fish breeders get away with such small tanks,the water is perfect in every way.The way I see it is you'd never say that a child needs to grow up in a 3 bedroom house with a back yard, kids can have very happy childhoods in tiny 2 bedroom flats if they have loving parents who provide a good environment for them,pets are the same i think.

My personal reasons for keeping my guy in a 10g npt tank by himself is that it brings me a great deal of satisfaction.He uses the whole space,has developed a personality to match the size of the tank and has become so muscly now I almost thought there was something wrong with him (as it turns out he has a very muscly caudal peduncle from all that swimming!)Seeing him in such a large space gives me joy and this is the only reason why I have him in such a tank. Really I think it's a personal choice thing and truthfully if you're happy and your fish is happy then I don't see the problem with smaller critter keeper type tanks.Every fish I've ever seen in one seems as happy as mine.
Bellus Bellator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2011, 11:36 AM   #29 
dramaqueen
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Central Texas
I keep 3 of mine in gallon containers but the water is changed regularly.
dramaqueen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2011, 01:53 PM   #30 
Myates
Member
 
Myates's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Ditto- I mostly use 1-2 gals myself, unfiltered (luckily there are a few good plants that require little in the way of care hehe). I maintain the proper water condition/temp and lighting. It's definitely not impossible, nor is it bad to use tanks smaller then 3 gals- but as mentioned above, it's that a lot of people don't realize the extra care a smaller tank requires. But a smaller tank can make a great home nonetheless. And sometimes, some bettas prefer a smaller tank- put one of my boys in a 1 gal for treatment for an unknown internal bacteria condition he had when I got him, when I tried to put him in a larger tank, he wouldn't swim or eat, nothing- so back into the one gallon and he's eating and all fine and dandy. Silly fish...
Myates is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sorry to bother you about Xan again... ninjaofthe9seas Betta Fish Diseases and Emergencies 5 07-24-2011 04:01 PM
Should I bother with a light? Cutar Betta Fish Care 6 08-07-2010 10:55 PM
Is this going to bother my bettas? Lynn08 Betta Fish Bowls, Habitats, and Accessories 8 08-06-2009 07:11 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.