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Old 07-25-2013, 01:06 PM   #1411 
PetMania
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*Sorry if this is long.
You should cycle your tank for at least a few days before you add the baby betta. In the new tank, you should have something that produces ammonia so that the new filter can grow the bacteria and start doing it's work. You could use dead plant material, fish food, etc. Also, you will have to watch your ammonia levels everyday. The bacteria in the tank will go about doing its job in turning the ammonia into nitrites, then turning that into nitrates. Test the water every day for all three os these. When the ammonia goes to zero, your new tank is cycled and ready to acclimate fish. But I would prefer leaving the cycled tank to run at least one more day.
Don't forget to watch your nitrites and nitrates. If they are too high whilst the ammonia is dropping, you still need to watch out for that. Do water changes until they go down. Nitrites and nitrates are still bad for fish.
Do a 30% water change (when the ammonia goes down) to help the filter out. Don't add fish until the ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates have gone down.
Hope this helps :)

Last edited by PetMania; 07-25-2013 at 01:13 PM.
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Old 07-25-2013, 01:28 PM   #1412 
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Petmania has it partially right. Cycling isn't just the ammonia, though, and it often takes longer than just a few days unless you have something to seed it. However, cycling without fish is a lot faster than cycling with your fish in! (You can let the ammonia and nitrite be at toxic levels when cycling without your fish, but if you try to cycle with your fish you need to do water changes to keep those at healthy levels, but that slows down the cycling process.)

To cycle without your fish, you need a source of ammonia. PetMania's right in that you can use dead plants or fish food, but I prefer to just use pure ammonia so that I can control how high the ammonia levels are. It can be a bit hard to find pure ammonia, but I found mine at Ace Hardware.

Either way, you want both ammonia and nitrites to drop down to 0 in the presence of whatever ammonia-adding agent before you're cycled. By then you'll have built up a lot of nitrates, so you'll want to do a massive water chance (90-100%), removing whatever ammonia source you were using, before adding your baby.

Good luck! And if you want more info on using the pure ammonia, just ask. :)
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Old 07-25-2013, 02:21 PM   #1413 
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Thanks Flyby for putting in the info I forgot.
I'm not too much of a morning person.
Good Luck :)
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Old 07-25-2013, 04:46 PM   #1414 
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Depending on the size of the tank (I can't see the picture so I don't know if it's related) but water changes should be done every day or every other day at least at 50% so a cycle isn't totally necessary for a baby unless you know you won't be able to do those water changes. Just wanted to put that there too. If it's bigger than 3 gallons then I wouldn't worry about cycling it right now but just do daily or every other day changes and that should be fine, it would start to cycle it anyway.
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Old 07-25-2013, 04:49 PM   #1415 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilnaugrim View Post
Depending on the size of the tank (I can't see the picture so I don't know if it's related) but water changes should be done every day or every other day at least at 50% so a cycle isn't totally necessary for a baby unless you know you won't be able to do those water changes. Just wanted to put that there too. If it's bigger than 3 gallons then I wouldn't worry about cycling it right now but just do daily or every other day changes and that should be fine, it would start to cycle it anyway.
Why shouldn't the tank be cycled? No matter the size. Don't the levels have to stablize?
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Old 07-25-2013, 04:53 PM   #1416 
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Originally Posted by PetMania View Post
Why shouldn't the tank be cycled? No matter the size. Don't the levels have to stablize?
Not saying that they don't have to cycle it, but it's not necessary. With babies you have to do so many water changes that it's going to screw up the cycle anyway causing Mini-Cycles and other things so hence it's not necessary to cycle a smaller tank since usually more water is being taken out and all that good stuff.

However, yes, if it's bigger than 3 gallons it won't mess with it as much even if a 50% daily water change is done. So yes, it would help to cycle it for sure.
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Old 07-25-2013, 04:58 PM   #1417 
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Originally Posted by Flyby Stardancer View Post
Petmania has it partially right. Cycling isn't just the ammonia, though, and it often takes longer than just a few days unless you have something to seed it. However, cycling without fish is a lot faster than cycling with your fish in! (You can let the ammonia and nitrite be at toxic levels when cycling without your fish, but if you try to cycle with your fish you need to do water changes to keep those at healthy levels, but that slows down the cycling process.)

To cycle without your fish, you need a source of ammonia. PetMania's right in that you can use dead plants or fish food, but I prefer to just use pure ammonia so that I can control how high the ammonia levels are. It can be a bit hard to find pure ammonia, but I found mine at Ace Hardware.

Either way, you want both ammonia and nitrites to drop down to 0 in the presence of whatever ammonia-adding agent before you're cycled. By then you'll have built up a lot of nitrates, so you'll want to do a massive water chance (90-100%), removing whatever ammonia source you were using, before adding your baby.

Good luck! And if you want more info on using the pure ammonia, just ask. :)
I set up a planted 10 gal tank two weeks ago. I thought I was cycling the tank. I have it running with a filter, and bio media. I was going to bring the bio media over from the tank my fish is in when I add the fish. Do I still need to do the ammonia part? Will the ammonia kill my plants?
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Old 07-25-2013, 05:02 PM   #1418 
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Hmmm. At least watch the ammonia levels. You probably don't need to add something for the bacteria to process. You've been cycling it for 2 weeks?
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Old 07-25-2013, 08:12 PM   #1419 
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I saw that ray thing on Tumblr! It's such a great explanation - I had no idea what people meant by branching. Now it makes sense!

Phoenix is doing super well - I've had her for almost a month now, which I just realized and am completely shocked by. She's finally got the little potbelly going on and her colors are darkening up, although if anything startles her at all she goes completely colorless and gets her stripes back. Sometimes she has vertical stripes, too. When her colors are actually there she's kind of a maroon color, and the rays on her fins flash kind of lavender in the light. I have no idea what she'll end up looking like!
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Old 07-25-2013, 09:42 PM   #1420 
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Originally Posted by TexasRose View Post
I set up a planted 10 gal tank two weeks ago. I thought I was cycling the tank. I have it running with a filter, and bio media. I was going to bring the bio media over from the tank my fish is in when I add the fish. Do I still need to do the ammonia part? Will the ammonia kill my plants?
If you hadn't added any sort of source of ammonia, then it wasn't cycling. It was sitting there with plants trying to grow. And ammonia won't kill your plants, they'll absorb it as a nitrogen source, same way they do nitrate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilnaugrim View Post
Not saying that they don't have to cycle it, but it's not necessary. With babies you have to do so many water changes that it's going to screw up the cycle anyway causing Mini-Cycles and other things so hence it's not necessary to cycle a smaller tank since usually more water is being taken out and all that good stuff.
Agreed that you don't necessarily NEED a cycled tank if you're doing many water changes anyways. However, doing water changes won't cause mini-cycles unless you forget to dechlorinate the water and the chlorine/chloramines kill the BB. The many water changes that need to be done during a fish-in cycling process only slow down the growth of BB, not kill them.
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