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Old 01-08-2012, 02:48 AM   #1 
Myrtaceae
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Smile Learning about Wild Bettas

Don't get me wrong here-- I do love our dear splendens. But my current interest in plakats had gotten me interested in reading more about about wild bettas.

Does anyone have any good book/website/blog recommendations? Google is awesome and all, but anyone can put up a website, so I'd love to hear recommends. I work in a bookstore, so I'm very open to ordering/subscribing to print materials.

I'm not planning a wild tank anytime soon (waaaaay more research required), but I'm itching to learn more about these guys!

I've got an amateur's interest in genetics and a decent understanding of basic chemistry (my organic chem is iffy at best, but I'm willing to read).
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Old 01-08-2012, 03:25 PM   #2 
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I have quite a few species of wild bettas, and honestly the care involved is way easier than that of my splendens. They are much less neurotic, and if tank-bred, are not as fussy about water conditions and diet.

The IBC website as well as Seriously Fish have a lot of good basic info on wild species. I personally prefer wilds from the coccina complex (often called Clarets because of their colour) but the larger mouthbrooders are also nice.

The good thing about wilds is most species can be kept in pairs/groups without much aggression at all.

At the moment I am growing out some albi fry, and waiting on my strohi and channiodes males to release.

Edit:


Here's a photo of my Betta livida male as an example of how tame they can become once used to your presence

Last edited by LittleBettaFish; 01-08-2012 at 03:27 PM.
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Old 01-08-2012, 06:50 PM   #3 
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Wait so you can keep wild bettas in pairs?
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Old 01-08-2012, 06:57 PM   #4 
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Yep, though some pairs may require a 10-30 gallon tank depending on their aggression levels.

My Ideii pair have to live separately as they will kill each other, while species such as channiodes and albimarginata can live peacefully in small groups. I believe wild splendens and a couple of others do best when kept separated due to aggression.

Fry can generally be raised with the parents as most will not eat them.
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Old 01-08-2012, 11:23 PM   #5 
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I can see that I'm going to be losing a lot of time on SeriouslyFish... :)

Do you have any threads with more pictures of your wild tanks LittleBettaFish? I didn't see any offhand, but if you have I'll look harder. :D
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Old 01-08-2012, 11:35 PM   #6 
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They're nothing special, just moss, IAL, wood and peat, but they are kind of hard to take good photos of because I don't have lights over most of them and the tannins stain the water. They look much nicer in person.



Channiodes



Coccina



Imbellis (yes there is wood under that moss I promise)



Livida



Tussyae



Channiodes male



Channiodes male and unknown gender



Strohi dad holding eggs (hence the full mouth)


Strohi female wanting to be fed


Rutilan mum or dad, not sure
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Old 01-09-2012, 01:52 AM   #7 
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Ooh, I love the look of the Strohis. The white tips on the Channiodes are kind of adorable though. They must love all swimming through all of that moss. That piece of driftwood in the Livida tank is really cool looking, sort of mangrove-y.

I have like 12 tabs open on SeriouslyFish right now. Firefox is going to bleep at me in a minute and tell me I need a new window.
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Old 01-09-2012, 03:33 AM   #8 
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I believe the wood is grapevine. It fuzzes up a bit, but I think it looks natural.

The smell of some of my wild betta tanks is gross, but the water is actually clean. It's just the wood sliming and leaves decomposing. It's very different from how my splendens live.

The Strohi are a decent size. Around 8-10cm. However, I would recommend either channiodes or albis as a good base species for people new to wilds.

They are easy breeders (sometimes you will have to remove the female as she will starve a male to death), very gentle with each other and other small fish (I kept mine with honey blue-eyes and clown killifish) and are not as fussy about water conditions. You can rear the fry up with their parents, and neither mum or dad will eat them (usually).
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Old 01-09-2012, 03:11 PM   #9 
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Oh I was just admiring your Strohi :) No plans for a wild tank yet. I do love the look of them though; they look like strong fish.

I have to admit, the idea of breeding a mouthbrooder is appealing. The only thing I've bred in aquaria is ghost shrimp (which is actually kind of a pain in the butt, but worth it).

Anyway, I'm very much in the absorbing/reading/learning phase at this point.
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Old 01-09-2012, 03:55 PM   #10 
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Oh no that's fine. I was just suggesting a couple of species that would be good as a first step into wilds.

I just wish more of my fish were paired. I've got lots of same-gender pairs, which is annoying as I would like to breed more.

I will try and get some photos of my albimarginanta fry in the grow-out. They are so much cuter than any splenden fry I have seen. Newly released albi fry look like miniature fish, rather than tadpoles.

Eventually I plan on only having a barracks with some imported HMPK males, a sorority tank, and the rest of my fishroom dedicated to wild bettas and natives.
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