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Old 02-11-2012, 09:31 AM   #21 
Zappity
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Originally Posted by Tikibirds View Post




The only issues with chinchillas is, you need to get their stuff from a petstore and the nearest one around here is 30 miles south. Food and dust bath can be pricy compared to other animals, plus they need things to constantly chew
*squee* OMG, baby chinchilla is soo adorable!! :D


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Originally Posted by Laki View Post
oh my goodness. Baby chinchillas are arguably cuter than baby bunnies!!!
Agreed!

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Originally Posted by ilovebunnies View Post

The white one is Alphonse and the brown one is Piggy. They are a bonded male and female pair. I've had them for 5 years.

I have never owned birds or chinchillas, just bunnies. If you are considering getting a pet bunny please research it first. www.rabbit.org They aren't as simple to care for as most people (and petshops) make them out to be. They have specific dietary needs and should live indoors with the family (NEVER outside in a hutch). I have cared and rescued quite a few rabbits and I know quite a bit about them, so if you have questions please ask.

And I also agree with the others about adopting a rabbit. They come spayed/neutered which is a plus cause you won't have to pay more to get it done by a vet. Also, spaying/neutering rabbits is very important so you don't run into health and behavioral problems latter on. Oh, and also rabbits typically do better when they are kept with another rabbit. Rescues have bonded pairs that can be adopted. Getting a bonded pair is much easier than doing it yourself.
Yes, I always research before buying an animal ;]
If I can talk my Mom into going to a shelter whenever I decide, I will most likely get one there.

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Originally Posted by Tracy Bird View Post
This is LUCKY....

I inherited him/her when my brother passed.

It's like a zoo around here..... wouldn't have it any other way!


Woah.. He's gorgeous! How old is he? Is he hard to keep?

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Originally Posted by MandiceP View Post
I'm sure you've thought of this, but just be sure you are ready for the lifespans that come with the three animals you are interested in. I've had two rabbits... one lived to be 13 the other 12. and I had 2 chinchillas. Unfortunately the first one died of a sickness and the second one I believe died of depression. But they have the ability to live 15+ years as well. And birds, well.... they can outlive us, lol. Just a warning. If you are prepared to take on the commitment of the animal's full lifespan, go for it! I definitely think you have a better chance at an affectionate pet in a rabbit. If you want a "constant toddler" level of energy and mischief and don't mind not really being able to cuddle it, then a chinchilla could be right for you. I'm not a huge fan of birds so I won't chime in on them. I'll leave that to the ones who know more about me. Again... I'm not downing your wanting to get one of these animals. Simply just making sure you've thought about the commitment they come with long term :) happy deciding!

Heh, yeah. That's the main thing that's holding me back. :-/ Especially with the birds...
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Old 02-11-2012, 12:05 PM   #22 
Tracy Bird
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"Woah.. He's gorgeous! How old is he? Is he hard to keep?"


AGE: Not exactly sure my local Parrot shop suggests he/she is at least 35-40 years old. They also identified LUCKY as a wild caught bird based on his leg ring. I've had him for 11 years and my brother had him for 15 years. When I'm gone LUCKY will go to my oldest son....

IS HE HARD TO KEEP: No not hard to keep, but like fish we need to understand the animal and try to replicate features of their natural environment as best we can.

Lucky's from the Amazon rainforest... guess what it does in the rain forest EVERYDAY - It rains..... So you have to reguarly mist the parrot with water and often LUCKY will shower with me.

In the wild Macaw's constantly chew, so you must provide wood on a daily basis.

When they aren't chewing, they forage for food... so to keep him happy and healthy we'll hide some nuts in boxes and let LUCKY find them.

No different than fish: Cichlids need caves, Cardinals need plant cover, Otos need wood etc. - provide your pets with what they need.

They are not difficult to keep, but something that one should carefully consider before purchasing.
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Old 02-11-2012, 02:32 PM   #23 
Olympia
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"So you have to reguarly mist the parrot with water and often LUCKY will shower with me."
Omg that sounds adorable! I think the thing with large parrots is commitment, as Tracy said they live a LONG time. Also you have to do a lot of research, large birds bond intensely to their owners (like dogs, certain types are generally one person birds while others tend to be more okay with a larger family) and need to spend a lot of time with you ;)
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Old 02-11-2012, 10:26 PM   #24 
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wO9BzuvM-A4
My bunny, Sophie, playing with my dog xD

Having kept parakeets, chicks, and ducklings, and having volunteered at the VT Wildlife Rescue Association taking care of injured songbirds and raptors, I do have to say that birds in general can be rather messy. I don't know about other species, but maybe that's something you'd want to consider. My parakeets definitely weren't as messy as the chicks and ducklings, but they did love dumping out their food and looking for specific types of seeds (it was a mixture of seeds and one of them was rather picky).
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Old 03-10-2012, 09:25 PM   #25 
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Seen these guys while in Columbia. It was some kind of bird sanctuary thing at the port of cartagena

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Old 03-11-2012, 03:46 PM   #26 
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Parrots are a huge commitment, they're highly intelligent and wild animals. Sorry that the post is so long, but I've met so many neglected birds and bird shelters are always so over packed because people don't know what they're getting into, sorry if it sounds harsh I just want to make sure you know what your getting into if you decide on a bird over a chinchilla or rabbit.

I'm not sure why the person above said birds are not hard to keep. Here's my opinion.

Birds are very hard to keep, for me it's easy because I understand bird behavior and can read the subtle body language but for someone new theres a ton of mistakes that can be made. Also, keep in mind that some birds will hate their owners, or just prefer someone else in the house. Most birds prefer a specific gender as well, mine prefers men so I countered that by socializing her with lots of men and women, in a way it makes me feel a little special that I'm her favorite person even though I'm a girl.

A few important facts
-Parrots cannot live on seeds only, they need a high quality pellet diet, fresh fruits, veggies, grains, eggs, and other healthy foods to stay healthy. When feed a seed only diet most parrots will develop organ failure, fatty tumors, or fatty liver disease and die a early death.

- often when a bird is purchased it is young and cuddly, then they start going through puberty and they go through the teenager years. With a cockatiel this is pretty easy but the larger birds can be unpredictable to a untrained eye and even a medium sized bird can send you to the emergency room to get stitches. Once the teenage years are over your bird will go through breeding seasons once a year and have varying degrees of hormonal aggression. Sometimes intense and sometimes barely noticeable, just depends on the bird.

-Birds are not mammals and breath with a series of air sacks. The air is kept in their bodies much longer and things that are fine for you and I can kill a bird in 15 minutes or less in some cases.

Self cleaning ovens,
Non stick pans and any Teflon products,
air fresheners,
scented candles
burning oil, over heated pans, and smoke
some printers,
and much much more.

-Way to many people pet birds in completely inappropriate ways. Petting a bird on the back is fine if you can read it's body language and not over due. If you aren't careful you'll be telling the bird you want to be it's mate and start a relationship that is absolutely cruel to the poor bird, they should never be forced to watch the love of their life having a relationship with someone else. Several species will react violently by attaching the offending person, or punishing the person they believe to be their mate.

-lots of socialization, harness train the bird so you can take him/her out with you places if you want. Let them meet people of different races and see new things. Some people don't agree with this and that's fine, while outside your encounter different germs and wild birds who might carry diseases, it's a risk and some people will take it while others don't.

-If your bird ever bites or screams angrily at you it's always your own fault. They are doing this to tell you something is wrong and you should never be punished for it. In fact, punishing all together is not recommended. With birds positive reinforcement is the way to go.

-Some birds shouldn't have their wings clipped for health reasons. Galahs are a good example, these cockatoos are prone to obesity and when given a improper diet and no vigorous exercise only achieved with flight they will barely make it to the age of 30 if you lucky, With healthy pellets they might make it to 45. These birds can live into their 60 or more if exercised and fed a healthy diet, without these the most common thing that kills them is fatty liver disease and they often will show fatty tumors.

My bird


I have a Galah Cockatoo, she was abused and neglected by her past owners, some friends of mine rescued her when her owners was trying to give her away because her husband was going to kill her. She was in a budgie cage that needed to be cut open for her to get out, she had a broken leg and both her legs where extremely weak, part of her upper mandible was missing, her feathers where brown/yellow tinted probably caused by a bad diet. She was also a plucker and still has some large bald patches. She was so terrified and would throw herself on the bottom of the cage so hard that she would injure herself when someone walked by.

When I brought her home she was much better, but still had almost no grip in her legs. She was very flighty and new things scared her. It took about 6 months for her legs to get their strength back and to get her off the sunflower seed diet my friends gave her.

Some pics
Rosie in her Harness out on a walk






Rosie flying. You can also see a section she plucked, it looks better but we're still working on it.

Last edited by copperarabian; 03-11-2012 at 03:51 PM.
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Old 03-11-2012, 08:59 PM   #27 
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i was thinking about getting a bird any tips? i will most likely want it PM(ed) thanks. i seen rabbits, and chinchilla's i suggest rabbits, i never held a chinchilla before. am more of a "reptile, and fish" person
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Old 03-11-2012, 09:08 PM   #28 
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My Spike

This is my Spike. I've had her for almost 12 years now and I love her. My sister was a breeder and this one got kicked out of the nest just after hatching so my sister hand raised her and gave her to me. She has one clubbed foot and the other never developed correctly but I love her regardless :) birds are hard work but once you get into a pattern you almost don't notice it.
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Old 03-11-2012, 10:24 PM   #29 
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is she a cockatiel? i was thinking about those also from (catching myself) researching on them, wouldn't a normal gray (if she is a normal gray cockatiel) female would have a fully gray body and head?? only males have the yellow head, pic (not mine, i don't even own a bird [yet lol, jk]) :
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Old 03-11-2012, 10:25 PM   #30 
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not to double post i didn't knew how big it was o-0 sorry
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