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Old 02-25-2012, 06:35 PM   #21 
BettaMommy531rip
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Luv the petunias! They are so gorgeous!
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Old 02-26-2012, 07:33 AM   #22 
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I'm not sure if it counts as a garden (I can't garden due to illness, but I can manage small pots) but my windowsill is chock full of carnivorous plants. I would like to rearrange it some day and free up some space for windowsill vegetables though - I'm all for growing my own veggies!
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Old 02-26-2012, 08:21 AM   #23 
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I'm a gardener in training. We bought a boatload of annuals and perennials last year, planted them and now I have no clue what to do come springtime.

I'll take some before pics and then come back to this thread for advice when it's time to get started. I'm hoping that the iris bulbs that I planted come back. I had a lot of leaves last year but no flowers. Irises and lilys are probably my favorites.
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Old 02-26-2012, 12:58 PM   #24 
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They are beautiful. :)
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Old 02-26-2012, 03:01 PM   #25 
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Quote:
I'm not sure if it counts as a garden (I can't garden due to illness, but I can manage small pots) but my windowsill is chock full of carnivorous plants.
Omg, I love those. I raised whole crops of sundews, literally thousands, and had to give them away to my local plant nursery. All my friends - and thier friends, lol - had at least one. I have had success with pitchers, but not so much with flytraps, no idea why.

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I'm hoping that the iris bulbs that I planted come back. I had a lot of leaves last year but no flowers.
Some irises can take several seasons to flower - but once they get going, there's no stopping them. Also, you can't plant them too deep or you'll just leaves forever, the rhizomes should be just under the soil surface and no deeper. Irises and lilies are my favourite flowers, too. :)
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Old 02-26-2012, 03:03 PM   #26 
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Originally Posted by Aus View Post
Omg, I love those. I raised whole crops of sundews, literally thousands, and had to give them away to my local plant nursery. All my friends - and thier friends, lol - had at least one. I have had success with pitchers, but not so much with flytraps, no idea why.
Oh that sounds awesome. I focus on pinguicula (butterworts) which, in essence, have a similar trapping method to sundews. I do have a trough of sundews and a couple of small pots containing seedlings, as well as several other pots containing baby venus fly traps.

I used to own several pitcher plants (American and tropical) but had to pass them onward due to medical stuff. My pinguicula collection however keeps growing.
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Old 02-26-2012, 03:12 PM   #27 
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I always wanted to try butterworts! Any tips on keeping them healthy?

In fact, I am seriously thinking of a carnivorous terrarium, I saw one on some gardening site a while back and it was simply awesome - they had butterworts, pitchers, sundews.. just a wonderful display, and cleverly done to cater to all the various needs. I too have had to give up large gardens due to my health, and have been looking at maybe bromeliads (I have a couple to test it out) - but maybe a return to the carnivores could be just the thing! Thanks for the inspiration. :)
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Old 02-26-2012, 03:27 PM   #28 
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Mexican pinguicula are by far the easiest of the pinguicula family to grow. I do have a website dedicated to pinguicula care but I'm not sure of the rules regarding posting foreign website links so I'll post some basic care notes, I hope they help.

As long as you give them pure water (reverse osmosis, rain water, distilled, deionised - water with a low/nil dissolved mineral content), soil lacking nutrients (so a peat based soil would be good, as long as it is mixed with various aeration materials such as perlite or pure silica sand (no fertilizers!)) and keep them not quite moist (and not allowing them to dry out) you should be okay - that and with as much sunlight as they can get (they do very well on a windowsill, that's where all mine are) and you are good to go.

Humidity for mexican pinguicula isn't as much of a concern as tropical or cold temperate species and some of the easiest mexican pinguicula species to grow are P. Weser, P. Esseriana, P. Moranensis and P. Tina.

Mexican pinguicula do also have a dry dormancy period. Unlike venus fly traps ("dionaea muscipula") and American pitcher plants ("sarracenia") pings do not die back, although their growth is slowed. Dormancy is induced by a reduction in light levels, prey levels and watering. The pinguicula should start to form non-carnivorous (also known as succulent) leaves which will stack unto each other and look somewhat like a carnation. This process usually happens mid to late autumn and will reverse come early/mid spring depending on when light levels pick up again. I haven't tested the effects of skipping dormancy on pinguicula however I have noticed that plants that have endured a disrupted dormancy (ie. not been left to do their thing and have been moved/kept warmer/moister than usual during winter) have not provided viable seeds.

It is possible that skipping dormancy in pinguicula will have a similar effect to that of skipping a venus fly trap/American pitcher plant's dormancy: a decline in health leading to death.

A note regarding P. Tina: Gorgeous species but it will only go into dormancy when it wants to. I've had one for two growing seasons now and it hasn't gone dormant at the same time as my other plants. Most of mine are coming out of dormancy whereas my P. Tina has started showing signs of going to sleep. Odd heh.
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Old 02-26-2012, 05:19 PM   #29 
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Thanks so much for the advice, I'm pretty keen to give them a try, if I can find a supplier around here.
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Old 02-27-2012, 05:05 AM   #30 
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You're very welcome! They are wonderful plants, I hope you can locate some :).
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