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Old 03-18-2012, 04:38 PM   #1 
Bettagurl48
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Will I be able to add other fish?

I just bought my first Betta yesterday from PetSmart. I named him Dragon. His head is dark blue (almost black) and his body gradually fades to pale blue at the tips of his tailfins. I decided to go with a moderately small tank, a cylindrical 3-gallon, and tried to make it comfy. I added blue aquarium gravel, smooth grey-brown stones, a Spongebob house w/ Spongebob and Patrick, along with a big, leafy plant. He is doing fine, and loves to explore the little hiding spots between the stones and plant leaves. I am going to start out with one, but later on, will it be possible to add others? He doesn't seem very agressive and spends a lot of his time in the back swimming in and out of the plant. I was hoping to be able to add some small, schooling company for him. Is that possible? And, if so, would it be best to wait for a few months or not? Please help.
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Old 03-18-2012, 08:01 PM   #2 
Bombalurina
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Sorry, but a 3 gallon tank is too small to cope with other fish. Firstly, they need more space to be active in, and secondly, the tank won't be able to cope with the bioload.
If you are really keen for him to have some buddies, try shrimp. :)
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Old 03-18-2012, 08:05 PM   #3 
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There are a few Invertebrate options. No fish though as most fish dont handle a number of factors that a 3 gallon might encounter of regularly does, such as aggression from the betta, ammonia reaching high, toxic levels, constant stress due to netting, along with moving out of the tank, and a space issue, most freshwater fish are far too active to be placed in that small of a tank resulting in them not showing there full potential. Actually it is highly likely that the betta will become nippy, and start tailbiing as most fish will be seen as zooming around in that tank to the betta due to how small it is.
most of the options below, I have done with success (ghost shrimp were hard to keep alive) which is why I recommended them. And I would highly recommend the nerite snails out of all


-Nerite Snails, not Apple Snails though as they have too high of a bio load. Nerite Snails would be a great choice mostly due to the fact of how much they help with algae, but still require supplements like algae wafers, and cucumber

-Pond Snails, These would be a great choice, as they have very minimal requirements, along with a very small bio load due t how small they are. you dont have to feed them, no special care. and they wont have a population boom as they do in community tanks unless you feed flakes, or your betta doesnt eat all the pellets. they also will provide as great cleaner crews in respect to decaying plant matter

-Ramshorn Snails, These would be a great choice, as they have very minimal requirements, along with a very small bio load due t how small they are. you dont have to feed them, no special care. and they wont have a population boom as they do in community tanks unless you feed flakes, or your betta doesnt eat all the pellets. they also will provide as great cleaner crews in respect to decaying plant matter

-Amano Shrimp, much hardier than the other shrimp and will tolerate 100% water changes alot better, along with not perfect water quality. They are very entertaining and fun to keep, Amano's will thrive with planted tank along with added supplements like shrimp pellets. I would highly recommend these, very awesome shrimp

-Ghost Shrimp, not much these as they require pristine water quality along with a minimal amount of stress. with 100% weekly water changes it will be very stressful

-Cherry Shrimp, not much these as they require pristine water quality along with a minimal amount of stress. with 100% weekly water changes it will be very stressful

your best Option would be Nerite Snails, Amano Shrimp, and Pond Snails

Last edited by Mo; 03-18-2012 at 08:24 PM.
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Old 03-18-2012, 08:06 PM   #4 
wystearya
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Originally Posted by Bombalurina View Post
Sorry, but a 3 gallon tank is too small to cope with other fish. Firstly, they need more space to be active in, and secondly, the tank won't be able to cope with the bioload.
If you are really keen for him to have some buddies, try shrimp. :)
All true, but I want to add to this.

Bettas -will- fight one another. He may not seem aggressive, but if there was another male in his territory things would likely be different. You really don't want to end up with two injured (or dead) fish.
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Old 03-18-2012, 10:28 PM   #5 
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+1^

He really should be kept alone. Betta males don't get lonely for other fish. They don't like other similar fish in their territory, and even chase their females away after breeding. Speaking of which, it's a bad idea to keep males and females together permanently too - especially in such a small tank.

One or two shrimp might be alright.
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Old 03-18-2012, 10:43 PM   #6 
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I just want to weigh in on the snail thing - I wouldn't recommend snails for less than 5 gallons, as they do have a really heavy bioload for their size.
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Old 03-18-2012, 10:48 PM   #7 
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Originally Posted by Bombalurina View Post
I just want to weigh in on the snail thing - I wouldn't recommend snails for less than 5 gallons, as they do have a really heavy bioload for their size.

^^+1.

I think nothing added in tanks under 5g, and 10g+ if you want to add fish.
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Old 03-19-2012, 07:50 PM   #8 
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Honestly the snails I recommended, I recommended for a reason, there are many snails that I wouldn't recommend due to the bio load, the snails I suggested have a very minimal bio load because
-they a small
-eat very little
They won't be a strain on the bio load at all, ramshorns and pond snails, along with nerites wont affect the bio load in a negative way


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The Pond Snail, like the Trumpet Snail, has unfortunately earned itself a bad name. It is considered an aquarium pest, however I disagree when it comes to maintaining an invert tank.

The most common mistake people make in an aquarium is overfeeding. Overfeeding a major contributer to a lot of deaths, sickness, over population, etc. of invert tanks. Instead of blaming the Pond Snail for overpopulating, instead blame the person feeding the tank. Snails will not be nearly as prolific if you minimize feeding.

The good thing about Pond Snails is their cleaning abilities. I love to have them in all of my invert tanks because they are great scavengers. Any leftover food or dead carcass will quickly be eated by these snails. Another thing that I love about pond snails is that they do not grow to a large size. The largest Pond Snail that I have ever seen was maybe a bit over 1/4" in size. Ramshorn Snails can grow to be huge which can really affect a shrimp tank.

I recommend keeping Pond Snails in a shrimp tank. If there are too many then it is a sign that you are overfeeding. Feed your shrimp only what they can eat in an hour. More then that and you are going to have too many snails in your tank.
http://www.planetinverts.com/pond_snail.html
The only note I have is that Ramshorns don't get very large at all and the biggest One that I have seen is about the diameter of a quarter, which won't have a big effect on the bio load, especially considering that it is very rare to over feed in a Betta tank on a staple diet of mostly pellets, please note that there actually are a larger species of ramshorn commonly called, giant ramshorns which get a bit bigger than your normal ramshorn

Quote:
Ramshorn snails are very common and come in various sizes. Their shape is as their name suggests. The smaller varieties (under 1 cm) are not too damaging to a plant tank, although they seem to relish the tender leaves of the Hygrophila family. The other type is the dark and light brown striped Columbian Ramshorn that can grow big as large as 2 inches in diameter. The stripes run the length of the shell with a pattern of random width light-dark- light stripes that stays constant throughout the snails life. These snails are extremely prolific and have a terrific appetite for plants.**

Snails lay eggs on the plants in the pond, the eggs are covered in jelly to protect them. When the eggs hatch they are full of little baby snails.

These snails use lungs to breathe air, but since they can trap and store some air inside their shells, they can tolerate water with low dissolved oxygen.*

Position in Food chain

Primary consumers herbivore
They eat algae
They are eaten by fish, tufted ducks

They lay disk-shaped gelatinous clusters of eggs adhering to anything - plants, rocks etc. Plants also seem to be a choice for egg-laying. The ramshorn snails are all shaped like a flat coil, or the horn of ram. The genus Helisoma are American snails. The most popular of this group is from South America, does well in heated aquaria with little attention and is often introduced by accident where it breeds prolifically. This is the red ramshorn. The genera Planorbarius and Planorbis are found in cold waters, and thus are suitable for ponds. The Planorbarius snails may be up to 3cm in diameter, while the Planorbis grow only to 1.5cm. P.corneus, the Great Ramshorn, is brick red in colour, and likes still or slow-moving water. It will eat any detritus, both plant and animal, that it comes across. Like the apple snail, it is amphibious. The snails are hermaphrodite, and lay disk-shaped gelatinous clusters of eggs adhering to anything - plants, rocks etc. RAMSHORN SNAILS (PLANORBIS CORNEUS)

A generation ago, the European Red Ramshorn Snail was a common sight in freshwater aquariums. Today they are somewhat of a rarity due to careless breeding with the common ramshorn snail that has a less interesting brown body color.
We offer both the red and the brown ramshorn snails. The brown ramshorns are somewhat hardier, but both varieties are excellent choices for the freshwater aquarium as long as they are not kept together! If they are kept together, virtually all future generations will be brown, since the red color is a recessive characteristic.*

Culture Procedure:
Ramshorn snails are hardy and will thrive and multiply without attention in a freshwater aquarium (assuming the absence of snail eating fish!). They are excellent scavengers, eating algae, left over fish foods, etc. Usually they do minimal damage to plants.
To grow the finest specimens, the snails should be given plenty of room, warmth and food. Water should be slightly alkaline. Temperature is best at 75 to 80 F. Preferred foods include spinach, lettuce, hair algae, shrimp based fish foods and carrot.
Siphon off the bottom of the culture tank frequently and replace with aged freshwater. The flat amber egg masses will hatch within 12 to 40 days depending on temperature.*Ramshorn snails are very common and come in various sizes. Their shapeis as their name suggests. The smaller varieties (under 1 cm) are not too damaging to a plant tank, although they seem to relish the tender leaves of the Hygrophila family. The other type is the dark and light brown striped Columbian Ramshorn that can grow big as large as 2 inches in diameter. The stripes run the length of the shell with a pattern of random width light-dark- light stripes that stays constant throughout the snails life. These snails are extremely prolific and have a terrific appetite for plants. These snails have a flat-coiled shell.* The maximum shell diameter is just over ”.* Unlike the MTS, these are always visible, not minding the light at all.* They too are plant-harmless IME.* These reproduce by means of the familiar flattened, dense jelly-like egg masses spotted freely on any potentially algae-growing area.* These egg masses are clear to light amber in color, with the dark eggs or embryos showing clearly.* I have never found a fish that will eat or disturb the egg mass, but there may be such around.* Any snail-eating fish will devour the adult form of these beasts.* They have no opercula, so are available to snail-slurpers and snail-grinders alike.* Many fish will devour the small young of these snails, but they can still become population problems in overfed tanks.* By the way, they are easy to color select.* I have selected for red bodies several times by removing all dark-bodied snails (I raise snails for my puffers) from the tank as soon as they are seen.* At first you just select for lighter bodies, eventually for reddish, and finally for bright strong red.* This strain is suitable trade goods for a decent LFS.* I have also had white-bodied ramshorns, but this strain for me is harder to maintain- they seem weak and do not reproduce well (perhaps a desirable trait?), requiring backcrossing to normal colored snails fairly frequently for success.
http://www.mtbaker.wednet.edu/harmon...orn_snails.htm


Quote:
Nerite snails are found in saltwater, brackish water and freshwater. Although most think of marine aquariums when they hear the name Nerite snail, many species do well in fresh and brackish water as well. They do however need brackish water to breed. In the wild, Nerite snails are found in and around the Pacific and Caribbean Oceans. This gives them a near global distribution although they are not found naturally in the Atlantic Ocean. *They come in variety of different colors such as green, tan, black, white and zebra patterned.

The Nerite snails quickly became popular in the aquarium trade as both the saltwater and the freshwater species are very hardy and because of the fact that they are very good algae eaters. Most species eat only algae and to a lesser degree other vegetable matter. If you have an aquarium with a stable population of algae you will not need to feed your snails. They will find the food they need. They are however ferocious algae eaters and they might eat your aquarium clean of algae at which point they need to be fed vegetable matter. Ideal food includes sinking algae wafers and vegetable flake food that sinks to the bottom. There is however species that are scavengers and these species will need a more diverse diet. All Nerite snails will leave living fish and fry alone. If you see one eating on a dead fish you can be sure that the fish died before the snail started eating on it.
http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/snail/nerite.php

Last edited by Mo; 03-19-2012 at 08:00 PM.
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Old 03-20-2012, 05:43 PM   #9 
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But Ramshorns will give rise to absolutely explosive populations even without lots of food. They just multiply like rabbits.

Regardless of their size, I still wouldn't even add a ramshorn or nerite in less than 5 gallons. They have a higher bioload than a fish of the same size. I'd also not add pondsnails to anything anywhere, because they can live quite happily off various microrganisms. They won't overpopulate the tank that way, but it won't stop them multiplying.
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Old 03-20-2012, 08:38 PM   #10 
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They will nly multiplied to what the tank can support to feed them, the most you'll end up with is around 5 ponds, 2 ramshorns, and 1 Nerite. None of these seem to be over stocking
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