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Old 03-21-2012, 04:23 PM   #1 
duluoz
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Thoughts?

Once my betta recovers I'm thinking I'll get something else to put in there with him. Preferably something that'll clean the gravel a bit, and wont cause a lot of aggressive behavior.

Any suggestions on what might be good? I'm running a 2.5 tank with a filter. Not many plants, but I'll probably add some more if need be.
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Old 03-21-2012, 05:06 PM   #2 
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There are a few Invertebrate options. No fish though as most fish dont handle a number of factors that a 2.5 gallon might encounter of regularly does, such as aggression from the betta, ammonia reaching high, toxic levels, constant stress due to netting, along with moving out of the tank, and a space issue, most freshwater fish are far too active to be placed in that small of a tank resulting in them not showing there full potential. Actually it is highly likely that the betta will become nippy, and start tailbiing as most fish will be seen as zooming around in that tank to the betta due to how small it is.
most of the options below, I have done with success (ghost shrimp were hard to keep alive) which is why I recommended them. And I would highly recommend the nerite snails out of all


-Nerite Snails, not Apple Snails though as they have too high of a bio load. Nerite Snails would be a great choice mostly due to the fact of how much they help with algae, but still require supplements like algae wafers, and cucumber. You ideally should aim for a maximum of one, and increase the water changes to 1 75%, and one 100% water change weekly

-Malaysian Trumpet Snails, These would be a great choice, as they have very minimal requirements, along with a very small bio load due t how small they are. you dont have to feed them, no special care. and they wont have a population boom as they do in community tanks unless you feed flakes, or your betta doesnt eat all the pellets. they also will provide as great cleaner crews in respect to decaying plant matter. Please take into consideration that these are known to over populate the tank when given enough food, ideally you would aim for a maximum of around 5

-Pond Snails, These would be a great choice, as they have very minimal requirements, along with a very small bio load due t how small they are. you dont have to feed them, no special care. and they wont have a population boom as they do in community tanks unless you feed flakes, or your betta doesnt eat all the pellets. they also will provide as great cleaner crews in respect to decaying plant matter. Please take into consideration that these are known to over populate the tank when given enough food, ideally you would aim for a maximum of around 5

-Ramshorn Snails, These would be a great choice, as they have very minimal requirements, along with a very small bio load due t how small they are. you dont have to feed them, no special care. and they wont have a population boom as they do in community tanks unless you feed flakes, or your betta doesnt eat all the pellets. they also will provide as great cleaner crews in respect to decaying plant matter. When choosing these please be aware that when provided enough food they will over populate the aquarium, ideally you would want to aim for a maximum of 2

-Amano Shrimp, much hardier than the other shrimp and will tolerate 100% water changes alot better, along with not perfect water quality. They are very entertaining and fun to keep, Amano's will thrive with planted tank along with added supplements like shrimp pellets. I would highly recommend these, very awesome shrimp

-Ghost Shrimp, not much these as they require pristine water quality along with a minimal amount of stress. with 100% weekly water changes it will be very stressful

-Cherry Shrimp, not much these as they require pristine water quality along with a minimal amount of stress. with 100% weekly water changes it will be very stressful

Your best choices would be amano shrimp, malaysian trumpet snails, and pond snails
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Old 03-21-2012, 10:16 PM   #3 
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Again, Mod, I'm going to disagree with you. :p I really do not think snails are a good option for a 2.5 gallon. I'd suggest just going for the shrimp you have recommended (obviously just one species).

As Duluoz has a filter, 100% changes are unnecessary, so I think the shrimp will be ok. :) Definitely not more than 10, though.

Ghost shrimp would be my primary suggestion as they are great little scavengers who will trundle around happily on the gravel, and have a tiny bioload, thus making them more effective at cleaning than snails.
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Old 03-22-2012, 10:10 AM   #4 
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Woah, that is in depth. Thanks for the help, you two.
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Old 03-22-2012, 04:25 PM   #5 
MaisyDawgThirteen
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IMO nerite snails shouldn't be kept in anything less than a 10 gallon . . . I had mine in a 5 gallon and now he's in a 10 gallon and much happier.
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Old 03-22-2012, 04:32 PM   #6 
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Provided the right habitat, nerites will do jut as fine as they would do in a larger tank
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Old 03-22-2012, 04:35 PM   #7 
MaisyDawgThirteen
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Mine is just very active. 10 Gallon is better as well as there is more algae.
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Old 03-22-2012, 04:44 PM   #8 
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That is very innacurate information about the tank size having an effect in the algae produced, while there can be larger quantities produced, you usually dont have enough in the first place to support a nerites appetite, and diet,

The tank size doesn't mean it will support more algae, the lighting, and excess nutrients in the tank will depict the amount of algae there is in the tank. Nerites can do well on a diet if cucumber and other benificial vegetables, along with algae wafers as it would do on a diet of purely natural algae, that has been grown in the tank. You also can provide a good supply of algae by harvesting it yourself. This can be done by adding a small amount of decaying matter, or fertilizer to a jar, placing it in a good amount of sunlight, with a small rock in the bottom. And drop the rock in for the Nerite


In this particular situation tank size has virtually no affect, due to the difference being very minimal regarding gallons and dimensions.
The most likely problem you encountered was due to the stability of water parameters. As in a 5 gallon, the parameters regarding toxic substances such as ammonia and nitrites. these are going to be either very high, or fluctuating which are both very harmful to any such type of invertebrate or fish. In a 10 gallon this problem wont be as underlined and the parameters will be very stable and low, which will have virtually no affect negatively on the inhabitants. this is most likely the reason to why the nerite has showed an enlarged amount of activity, and personality

Last edited by Mo; 03-22-2012 at 04:59 PM.
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Old 03-22-2012, 04:56 PM   #9 
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Sorry, I guess that was bad info on my part. :P The 5 gallon also was just finishing cycling . . . I feed him algae wafers too.
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Old 03-22-2012, 05:04 PM   #10 
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while feeding algae wafers can be beneficial it can also result in a negative affect on the aquarium, leaving an algae wafer within the tank for a more so prolonged period of time can result in decaying matter. which them results in a high, harmful level of ammonia. which could have also been another factor.

Even if the tank as been cycled and completed this process, there still could be lots of problems related to cycling and the build up of the harmful substances. Usually only a mature tank, that has regular water changes encounters minimal problems regarding the water parameters which is why there is still the possibility in a newly cycled tank
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