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Old 04-03-2012, 08:32 PM   #1 
mattoboy
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*RESCUED* White Cloud Mountain Minnow

Hey guys!

So dad came home from work with a bottle of Flourish plant fertilizer, some more food, and a small White Cloud Mountain Minnow. I am currently acclimating him to the tank. Dad said he was all alone in a half gallon tank after all his other buddies die. I will eventually get him some more partners, but for now he will have to live alone with my betta in a 10 gallon. Pictures will be in the "Betta Pictures" section later because I will take a picture of them together. Thanks for the look! Updates every few days!

Matt
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Old 04-03-2012, 09:08 PM   #2 
thekoimaiden
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I think you may have more on your hands than you realize. WCMM need at least a 24 inch tank (20+ gallons) and like cooler temps (60F - 72F) than a betta. Since they are a schooling fish you will need at least 6 together, but the more you get the less nippy they will be. They are an active swimmer, so the longer the tank you can get, the better. Short-term keeping one in a tank with your betta will be okay, but for the fish's long-term health the school will need it's own setup.

More info: White Cloud Mountain Minnow (Tanichthys albonubes) TFK Profile and Seriously Fish - White Cloud Mountain Minnow (Tanichthys albonubes)
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Old 04-03-2012, 09:34 PM   #3 
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Thanks TheKoiMan! Everywhere I read though, it says they need at least 10 gallons? And the temperature is as 75 F right now; I wont raise it right now. And next week I will be purchasing at least 4 more.
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Old 04-03-2012, 11:40 PM   #4 
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75F is probably the closest you will get to a happy medium in that tank. If you look at those two links above (both cite scientific sources; I also know the author of one and he doesn't write anything that isn't supported by science or years of empirical observation), you will see that they require at least 20 gallons as they like to be in large groups and need ample swimming room. A 24" tank is a 20 gal. A 20 long would be preferred. So congrats on the second tank. Craigslist is a good place to find cheap used tanks.
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Old 04-04-2012, 05:07 AM   #5 
Tamyu
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I agree that you are going to need a lot more of them... And more space.
I don't, however, agree about the temperature. They are more than happy all the way up to around 80. They breed like rabbits at around 76 to 78 so that is where most shops and breeders keep their tanks.
They are fine in low temps - but the water in their natural habitat does get a lot warmer in the summer. I think that a lot of places forget that there are huge differences in temp over the year for these guys (and goldfish).

The main reason I wouldn't want to keep them with a betta at that temperature is that they like to have seasonal fluctuations, not all year round warmth. Another reason is that they will eat anything, even pellets that look way too big. Mine would steal from my goldfish when I had them in the same tank for a bit. The goldfish pellets were huge, but they would choke them down. I have no doubt that they would dart in and steal from your betta.

Which reminds me - they are one of the only fish I would actually suggest to keep with a fancy goldfish. (Or rather, a goldfish too small or too slow to possibly eat them.) They will eat the same food and like the same water.
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Old 04-04-2012, 12:21 PM   #6 
thekoimaiden
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Breeding is the reason they are kept up that high. As a pet, they are going to live a longer life kept down around 72F. It's the same case with guppies. They can be kept at higher temps, but will live a longer life if kept in the low 70's. At a higher temperature, a fish's metabolic processes work harder. Lower temps (within a fish's norm) slow this down. It is fine to raise it for breeding purposes as you must in some cases, but keeping a fish in the lower end of its preferred range is going to give it a longer life.
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Old 04-04-2012, 02:47 PM   #7 
Olympia
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Is it ironic that I read the same thing about angel fish, yet most people say to keep their water warmer?
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Old 04-04-2012, 03:19 PM   #8 
MaisyDawgThirteen
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^^
I agree. I keep my guppies at 73.
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Old 04-04-2012, 06:12 PM   #9 
Tamyu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thekoimaiden View Post
Breeding is the reason they are kept up that high. As a pet, they are going to live a longer life kept down around 72F. It's the same case with guppies. They can be kept at higher temps, but will live a longer life if kept in the low 70's. At a higher temperature, a fish's metabolic processes work harder. Lower temps (within a fish's norm) slow this down. It is fine to raise it for breeding purposes as you must in some cases, but keeping a fish in the lower end of its preferred range is going to give it a longer life.
It may be true that cooler temperatures lengthen their lifespan, but a shorter lifespan due to faster metabolism is a bit different from shortening their lifespan due to keeping them in unsuitable conditions.
Higher temps *are* within their norm - their natural habitat easily reaches and maintains those temperatures for part of the year. The difference between them and tropical fish is that their natural habitat also has very low temperatures.

The fish themselves seem happier, more active, and more comfortable in the higher temperatures. Slower metabolism does not mean that it is better for the welfare of the fish - it just keeps them alive longer, which is appealing for someone keeping them in an aquarium.
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Old 04-04-2012, 06:39 PM   #10 
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Originally Posted by Tamyu View Post
Slower metabolism does not mean that it is better for the welfare of the fish - it just keeps them alive longer, which is appealing for someone keeping them in an aquarium.
Aren't we keeping the fish in an aquarium? So, didn't you just kill your own argument...?

Either way, I'm going to have to agree with thekoimaiden. After honing my google-fu (and reading her sources) what shes said coincides with what I have found. :) and if you were wishing to breed then keeping them at higher temperatures would probably do it, just realize that you'd have fry to care for. :)
Good luck!
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