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Old 04-18-2012, 08:44 PM   #11 
Sena Hansler
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I have some live plants in un-lit tanks, which get some light from the window in the room and they grow nicely xD Some plants are darn hardy, and do well in low lit tanks, so LED is fine. Although if you really wanted, find a UV light - plants love it, and I find it doesn't heat the water up as drastically as some of the other ones. But I have a range from blue light (looks really cool), UV, clear, flourescent (gross orangey color), and no lights.

Also, check half of our sigs xD rarely can we keep JUST one betta bug bites and it bites hard
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Old 04-18-2012, 08:46 PM   #12 
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The orange colour of the fluorescent comes from a low kelvin rating. A proper one for a fish tank should be white with a hint of blue. Kelvin is literally the colour of the light, which is why some cheaper grade lights try to paint the lamp blue to create a proper kelvin reading (doesn't work)..
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Old 04-18-2012, 08:48 PM   #13 
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where do you get the idea of LEDS not growing plants very well? LEDS in fact will support tremendous, beautiful plant growth with medium to low light plants given the right wattage and placement.

PS. I made the plant thread sticky and a link is in my sig under the name of plants
Really?!! Am maybe thinking of floresent not being sufficient for growing?
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Old 04-18-2012, 09:02 PM   #14 
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LED should grow plants fine.
The problem with LED is that they are usually very low wattage (being so eco friendly) and I don't think they can penetrate the water well enough for supporting high light plant growth, you never see high wattage LEDs. ^-^
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Old 04-18-2012, 09:02 PM   #15 
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Nope maybe your are thinking of incandescent lights?
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Old 04-18-2012, 09:11 PM   #16 
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Originally Posted by Olympia View Post
The orange colour of the fluorescent comes from a low kelvin rating. A proper one for a fish tank should be white with a hint of blue. Kelvin is literally the colour of the light, which is why some cheaper grade lights try to paint the lamp blue to create a proper kelvin reading (doesn't work)..
Nice, I didn't know that.

Welcome to the forum too! Can't wait to see your tank set up.

Personally had great luck with java moss and moss balls living... Those two plants are hard to kill.

I am trying java fern now, but I can't say if it will be one that will live for me. I have a lot of them under an LED hood in a 5 gallon tank, but the hood is not recommended for live plants by the company and I can't figure out the kelvin etc stuff... we shall see. :D
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Old 04-18-2012, 09:12 PM   #17 
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If the tank receives even ambient room light, java fern should do fine.
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Old 04-18-2012, 09:54 PM   #18 
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Good to know! Then I believe I will go ahead and try planted! I'm sure the Betta will appreciate it.
Before bringing the Betta home, I only need to have the tank set up and running for a day or two in advance, correct?
I'm not 100% sure, so maybe someone can correct me on this, but I think it takes a little bit longer than that to establish a nitrogen cycle. I've always managed to establish cycles by doing the "fish in" method.
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Old 04-18-2012, 10:08 PM   #19 
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one to two days won't do much other than deplete chlorine if conditioner was never added (which it should be as aging water only rids of certain things and leaves the rest of the bad stuff in!). Cycling takes 4-6 weeks at best, fish in or not. However some people have bettas without ever knowing of the cycle, and the tank will end up cycling on it's own under proper conditions (for 5 gallons and up).
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Old 04-18-2012, 10:17 PM   #20 
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Before bringing the Betta home, I only need to have the tank set up and running for a day or two in advance, correct?
Glad you asked . The answer actually is no- this is probably THE most important part of setting up a tank: understanding the nitrogen cycle. This is the process by which certain bacteria convert fish waste (toxic ammonia) into the relatively harmless form of nitrate which is removed during water changes. Without established colonies of these bacteria, you will find yourself needing to do large water changes very frequently, and the entire tank will need to be fully emptied and cleaned on a regular basis. As this can be difficult and time consuming for an 8 gallon tank (not to mention that it can be difficult to find someone to clean a tank if you go on vacation), I highly recommend "fishless" cycling your tank before bringing your new pet home. This is the most humane method as it does not subject your fish to damaging levels of ammonia (in fact any level of ammonia is bad for your fish) and is least stressful on both fish and owner . Here is a great article that I suggest you read to start off with:

http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/b...m-cycle-47838/

I personally like the pure ammonia method best as it is most precise and least messy. As for using live plants, I've found it can go either way. Some people have great luck and can grow almost anything with very little effort...others not so much. I suggest that you read up on it and decide for yourself how much time and effort you are willing to put into it.

My only other tip would be to keep the water movement to a minimum. Having such long fins and originating in relatively stagnant waters, bettas prefer less current....which is why many of us use baffles to divert the flow of the filter. If you set up your filter and see a good current along the water's surface, you will probably need to remedy the situation. Luckily this is relatively easy and inexpensive. A long time ago I actually made a guide and it is a sticky in the Betta Fish Bowls, Habitats, and Accessories section of the forum if you need to reference it.

Hope this helps . Good luck!
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