Walstad Tank issues - Betta Fish and Betta Fish Care
 
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post #1 of 3 (permalink) Old 08-07-2019, 06:09 AM Thread Starter
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Question Walstad Tank issues

Hello, I have recently had to start up my tank again after moving, and I decided to try a new method, the Walstad Method. I have used potting soil, and under half an inch of sand, just because it would be too much because it's a lot more compact compared to gravel and I didn't want to suffocate the bacteria.

I don't have a light for my tank, so I've decided to go with low light plants.

The store sold me CYPERUS HELFERI, Blyxa japonica and some small Sword Plant. Oh, and a floating water wisteria (c).

Basically the Blyxa japonica is dying, going brown and mushy, though the Cyperus and Sword Plant seem to be holding on. The store recommended those to me, so now I've just decided I might as well come here to ask for advice on what types of plants to get.

For the record I am planning on using this tank to breed Betta's.

My question is, should I pull the Blyxa's out? Or wait for them to completely die?

My second question is what are some good low light plants? Ones good for breeding and just for the whole natural setting to the tank, something to mimic the Betta's environment. The wisteria seems to be doing good, so I'm guessing the other Blyxa's are dying because they actually require STRONG light.

P.S: I live in Australia, so some plants aren't available to me and I'm very limited here, but your help is still very appreciated.

Thanks!
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post #2 of 3 (permalink) Old 08-08-2019, 01:40 PM
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I haven't used the Walstad Method to know what exchanges happen with that thin of a layer of sand. You should also measure the water parameters to see if there's any ammonia leeching.

Unfortunately, for the plants Cyperus Helferi and Blyxa Japonica as you've found out, are both med to high light level plants and could benefit from CO2. Depending on the sword, it's most likely not too far off on it's light requirement either, medium light. Most new plants will melt when transplanted as they adjust to their new water parameters and will generally grow back, but with them being essentially high light level plants, I'm not sure how they would fare without a light.

If you're feeling like experimenting, leave them in to see if they will recover.

I'll let someone else chime in about breeding bettas as it is not something to be taken lightly. The breeding setup is completely different from their regular habitat and you need to have a plan all the way from cultivating food for the fry to what is the plan for about 100 juveniles.

For advice on specifically breeding bettas, you could start a post in the Breeding Betta Fish section for the members who frequent that area..
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post #3 of 3 (permalink) Old 08-08-2019, 10:20 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Veloran View Post
I haven't used the Walstad Method to know what exchanges happen with that thin of a layer of sand. You should also measure the water parameters to see if there's any ammonia leeching.

Unfortunately, for the plants Cyperus Helferi and Blyxa Japonica as you've found out, are both med to high light level plants and could benefit from CO2. Depending on the sword, it's most likely not too far off on it's light requirement either, medium light. Most new plants will melt when transplanted as they adjust to their new water parameters and will generally grow back, but with them being essentially high light level plants, I'm not sure how they would fare without a light.

If you're feeling like experimenting, leave them in to see if they will recover.

I'll let someone else chime in about breeding bettas as it is not something to be taken lightly. The breeding setup is completely different from their regular habitat and you need to have a plan all the way from cultivating food for the fry to what is the plan for about 100 juveniles.

For advice on specifically breeding bettas, you could start a post in the Breeding Betta Fish section for the members who frequent that area..
Thanks. Reading Diana Walstad's book she actually said she breed Betta's a couple times. The soil helped form Dapimia or whatever it's called, so the fry could eat. Something like that. But I trust that her method is most likely the best for fish, mimicking an ecosystem.
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