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Discussion Starter #1
As I was pondering upgrading tank sizes, and a possible plant tank, I was wandering around online and found some beautiful but large tanks. I said 10 feet?! My hubby said, that would be beautiful against the wall in your office!
Wait... what?! I didn't think he'd be that into it. I can't fit a 10 ft wide tank in this room at the moment, but now I'm looking at 4-5' wide tanks. Starting with a aquascaping setup I think. Make sure it's fully planted and ready for fish before I go hassling them into that.
Who knew I'd go from 2.5 to 5 to 10 to.. 45??

I still think that Ori will stay in a 'smaller' tank, even if that means just a 10-15 that fits right next to my desk. But I think the other fish, and future fish, could go in something bigger. I knew there was a reason I didn't find a bookshelf for that wall. :wink3:
 

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My favorite "large" tank is a 55. I think this month both PetCo and PetSmart have a $1.00-per-gallon sale. Go with PetSmart if you can as they carry Marineland. It is a more universal size that the Aqueon.

And there is really no need to do fish-less cycling unless one just wishes to do so. With the advent of products like SeaChem Prime which neutralize Ammonia and Nitrite for 24 hours there is really no danger to the fish if you add Prime daily. I have fish-in cycled since dirt and have never harmed/killed a fish while doing so. I'm still trying to understand all the brouhaha. :dunno:

https://www.bettafish.com/30-betta-fish-care/507585-cycling-two-sentence-tutorial.html
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My favorite "large" tank is a 55. I think this month both PetCo and PetSmart have a $1.00-per-gallon sale. Go with PetSmart if you can as they carry Marineland. It is a more universal size that the Aqueon.

And there is really no need to do fish-less cycling unless one just wishes to do so. With the advent of products like SeaChem Prime which neutralize Ammonia and Nitrite for 24 hours there is really no danger to the fish if you add Prime daily. I have fish-in cycled since dirt and have never harmed/killed a fish while doing so. I'm still trying to understand all the brouhaha. :dunno:

https://www.bettafish.com/30-betta-fish-care/507585-cycling-two-sentence-tutorial.html
Well, I was thinking more of the aquascaping first because in a tank that size I have a feeling I'll be doing daily adjustments for.. a while. It was more to not jostle the fish around and muck up their water right away. It just feels rude to set it up and then go in every day and redo it all. Then again these current fish all seem more interested than offended.
The angelfish came up and started nibbling my arm while I was messing around earlier. Guess he hoped for food bits.

I completely agree, I don't understand all the brouhaha over that either.
 

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I know you would be very pleased with what you can do with a 45 gallon as far as a planted tank goes. However with the 1.00 a gallon sale going on at Petco and Petsmart it is only on certain size tanks The tank sizes this applies to are 10, 20 High, 20 long, and 29 gallon for Petco any Aqueon tank over those sizes they carry in store would be 1/2 off the price. I'm pretty sure Petsmart is the same. Having a good amount of space in your office is a really great thin ( I know If I want space I have to go to the basement LOL) If you really have the space and since you are looking at the same length and width I would suggest a 75 gallon You may be surprised at how the size really does work. However it's not the space I worry about with larger tanks. It's the weight a 45 gallon tank weighs in the neighborhood of 376 pounds with just water in the tank this would not be with any substrate. With at the very least 2" of substrate in a 45 gallon you would need 90 pounds so that would increase the weight to 466 pounds, and then you would have other weight of decor so say 500 pounds total weight on a regular floor of a home You would need to make sure the floor could hold that weight. If you have an apartment you better ask the land lord for permission to have the tank and tell them what the weight is. Just in case the person living below you one day has a 500 pound aquarium in their apartment that they didn't want. If you have a cement floor under the tank you have no worries. (this is why I have all my large tanks in the basement I know the floor will hold the weight.

Just somethings to think about before you go to any expense. By putting a tank on a stand you also must know what that stand weight is combined with the total tank weight and make sure the stand will support the weight. I made a mistake like this years ago with a 55 gallon and it wasn't pretty when the stand collapsed under the weight and the apartment manager was not happy for the damage to our apartment and the one below us. It was an insurance claim on my part of over $15,000.00 that woke me up and also being thrown out of my apartment.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I know you would be very pleased with what you can do with a 45 gallon as far as a planted tank goes. However with the 1.00 a gallon sale going on at Petco and Petsmart it is only on certain size tanks The tank sizes this applies to are 10, 20 High, 20 long, and 29 gallon for Petco any Aqueon tank over those sizes they carry in store would be 1/2 off the price. I'm pretty sure Petsmart is the same. Having a good amount of space in your office is a really great thin ( I know If I want space I have to go to the basement LOL) If you really have the space and since you are looking at the same length and width I would suggest a 75 gallon You may be surprised at how the size really does work. However it's not the space I worry about with larger tanks. It's the weight a 45 gallon tank weighs in the neighborhood of 376 pounds with just water in the tank this would not be with any substrate. With at the very least 2" of substrate in a 45 gallon you would need 90 pounds so that would increase the weight to 466 pounds, and then you would have other weight of decor so say 500 pounds total weight on a regular floor of a home You would need to make sure the floor could hold that weight. If you have an apartment you better ask the land lord for permission to have the tank and tell them what the weight is. Just in case the person living below you one day has a 500 pound aquarium in their apartment that they didn't want. If you have a cement floor under the tank you have no worries. (this is why I have all my large tanks in the basement I know the floor will hold the weight.

Just somethings to think about before you go to any expense. By putting a tank on a stand you also must know what that stand weight is combined with the total tank weight and make sure the stand will support the weight. I made a mistake like this years ago with a 55 gallon and it wasn't pretty when the stand collapsed under the weight and the apartment manager was not happy for the damage to our apartment and the one below us. It was an insurance claim on my part of over $15,000.00 that woke me up and also being thrown out of my apartment.
That's an awful way to learn about the troubles of a tank, large or small. I've always been paranoid about tank breakage/leaking, whether in an apartment, an office or house. And in apartments, we moved so much I never really got comfortable with an aquarium.

Had dreams for ages of coming in to find the tanks nearly empty and fish struggling to breath. I'm sure there's something psychological in that, but it does carry through to my waking tank planning hours. :nerd:

Thankfully this is our house, at long last, and this is a good reminder I should make sure that the insurance would cover any major incidents. But there's no asking the landlord for permission anymore. (Although one of our previous landlords was the type to get excited over any pet additions we hoped to make, that was a nice change for many, many years there)

Last night I caught myself before I went all plant purchase crazy (which I do when it comes to plants of any kind, my yard is usually a master gardeners dream of unusual and unique plants), going between the different tanks. There is a HUGE difference in all of it when comes to 30 vs 45 vs 65 or higher tanks. Cost to get going, keep going, plans for the tank, where it goes, how heavy, what fish, etc.

Also have to make sure the stands can hold 400-650lbs. I have one stand I know will be fine but it is an awkward size.
Anything wider than 4 feet is probably going to have to sit in a window space of some sort, and while it's a north facing window in a very gray locale with trees that block most sun light, that doesn't mean it won't cause issues.

Going to consider it over the next few days as I finish organizing the office from our move back in after a major construction project, the 65+ gallon is tempting but I do worry I'm biting off more than I can chew so to speak. Not so much cost, because I'm well aware now that it will be an expense - I've seen what I can put into a 10 gallon in just plants! But more the maintenance, setup, and brooding over fish behaviors.

Then again, I can get a 30+ for one area and a 45-65+ for the other spot and see how it goes.. it doesn't help matters when one can get it delivered within 1-2 days of purchase. >:)

Might have to purchase a lounge chair for fish watching though.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yep your addicted. LMAO You have all, and I do mean all the symptoms Way to go. Got to love it .

It's so true. I'm itching to pull the trigger on a bigger tank, I even have a few plants on the way (before I stopped myself). But I really do want to get the stand and such setup before I find myself with a giant tank and all its accompaniments with no where to set it up.
I did look when I went to the pet store today. >.>
 

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First before you do anything else. You talked about putting the bigger tank in your office right? Take a tape measure in and measure the floor space you have. Measure the length of the tank space and then the width The height will only matter when you place it on a stand so you need to know how high the stand will be. (normal stand height is 30 -32 " from the floor to the top. Now here are some tank sizes in general size wise. Unless you get fancy with bow fronts. 40 gallon breeder tanks are 36" long by 18" wide and 16" high. Total weight filled and planted is around 500 lbs. and a good stand will displace this weight on the floor. 40 gallon High tank is 36" long 13" wide and 20 " high. with the same total weight. A 55 gallon tank is 48" long 13" wide and 16" high (long and narrow tank) Total weight is also around 550 lbs. this would also be disbursed by a good stand made for this size aquarium. A 65 gallon tank is 36" long by 18" wide and 24" high total weight is around 600 lbs. A 75 gallon tank is 48" long 18" wide and 24" high total weight is right around 700 lbs So now to find out if the tanks will be alright in your office as far as the floor taking the weight. You would have to look at the floor rafters if they run in a pattern Horizontal to the door the tank stand would sit on each rafter, and be supported by the floor. However if you look, and they run vertical this would mean there is no support for the stand and tank. all you have is the floor boards and sub floor to take the weight which will not be enough to support the aquarium. So you would need to be able to run the stand and tank horizontal to the rafters supporting the floor. This would be the only thing that would change weather youcould use the floor space.

Now go look at your tanks in the pet store measure each one for size look at the stands they have for them and pick the one you can afford. There are pet stores that sell complete setups and you may need to buy the filter and heater. The only way to go with the filter is a canister filter and with the difference in tank sizes and volume of water needed to heat you are looking at a 200 to 300 watt heater.

Yeah it's a lot to think of but so worth it when you have it setup and pull up a comfy chair or couch at night turn on the light and snuggle with you hubby. (so relaxing and then there is the fun of the snuggling and what happens when it turns yu back into a teenager again.) LOL
 

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First before you do anything else. You talked about putting the bigger tank in your office right? Take a tape measure in and measure the floor space you have. Measure the length of the tank space and then the width The height will only matter when you place it on a stand so you need to know how high the stand will be. (normal stand height is 30 -32 " from the floor to the top. Now here are some tank sizes in general size wise. Unless you get fancy with bow fronts. 40 gallon breeder tanks are 36" long by 18" wide and 16" high. Total weight filled and planted is around 500 lbs. and a good stand will displace this weight on the floor. 40 gallon High tank is 36" long 13" wide and 20 " high. with the same total weight. A 55 gallon tank is 48" long 13" wide and 16" high (long and narrow tank) Total weight is also around 550 lbs. this would also be disbursed by a good stand made for this size aquarium. A 65 gallon tank is 36" long by 18" wide and 24" high total weight is around 600 lbs. A 75 gallon tank is 48" long 18" wide and 24" high total weight is right around 700 lbs So now to find out if the tanks will be alright in your office as far as the floor taking the weight. You would have to look at the floor rafters if they run in a pattern Horizontal to the door the tank stand would sit on each rafter, and be supported by the floor. However if you look, and they run vertical this would mean there is no support for the stand and tank. all you have is the floor boards and sub floor to take the weight which will not be enough to support the aquarium. So you would need to be able to run the stand and tank horizontal to the rafters supporting the floor. This would be the only thing that would change weather youcould use the floor space.

Now go look at your tanks in the pet store measure each one for size look at the stands they have for them and pick the one you can afford. There are pet stores that sell complete setups and you may need to buy the filter and heater. The only way to go with the filter is a canister filter and with the difference in tank sizes and volume of water needed to heat you are looking at a 200 to 300 watt heater.

Yeah it's a lot to think of but so worth it when you have it setup and pull up a comfy chair or couch at night turn on the light and snuggle with you hubby. (so relaxing and then there is the fun of the snuggling and what happens when it turns yu back into a teenager again.) LOL
There's two spots I'm considering, one has a support beam under the near middle of it, and the other has one to the side but is also an exterior wall with some extra support. They just ripped up our floors not long ago and we got to go over exactly what they actually left out when constructing the house. Bleh.
If I go any larger than the 45 gallon I will likely have someone reinforce the floor, because of how lackadaisical they were putting it together.
From what I understand upwards of 1000-1500 pounds would be just fine in those spots, but that's not a risk game I feel like playing. Especially when it comes to living creatures in a water box.
I don't see myself going over the 63 gallon anyhow, and I'm considering the reality that even a 63 vs a 45 is a big difference in planting, maintenance, etc. I'm sure once I got the 45 set up I'd think "Why didn't I just get the 63?!" but I'm not there yet. :p
 

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Yes it is very different. You don't know how many people will impulse buy a tank and then get it home and it doesn't fit anywhere in the house, and with large tanks they don't realize they screwed up until the floor gives way to the weight and they have a loss of the tank and structural damage to the house or apt. When this happens it's too late to advise them to check thing out first. I heard one sales person tell a buyer of a 500 gallon tank that it would be fine in the house because they could put a refrigerator on the floor where they wanted to put the tank. ( Wrong, wrong , wrong ) Appliances do not weigh over 1000 lbs to start with and not even filled. Look at the width and length of a fridge, and then look at the size of a tank you are putting on that space. Yes the space will displace the weight to some extent. But if the floor is not reinforced to take the weight, Well then you have a disaster that won't take long to happen.

I think this is why I'm putting all my large tanks and breeders in the basement on a concrete floor and all shelving or racks will be designed to take at least 5000 lbs on each level. We have a house that was built back in 1900 it is now 120 years old. the construction at that time was done to last for ever, our foundation is brick and they are laid length wise end to end 4 bricks thick. This house will never come apart. Even so I would never put a tank larger than 29 gallon on a stand in one of our rooms up stairs. (plus my wife tells me I have enough tanks up stairs and I can't put any more in any other room but the office. )( I have now put 10 5.5 and 1 10 gallon in the office. Now I need to get busy and get the basement done before the spring comes. )) LOL.
 

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If I had that kind of basement setup I might consider that a much better option! As it is, if it falls through it's got a foot to go. Better than multiple floors but still worrisome on many levels.

All those tanks in one room must keep you very distracted. :)
I find myself staring over at them quite often, completely forgetting what I was working on, if anything at all given my desire to watch the fish.

Today I have to figure out what to do with the 5 gallon much sooner than I expected because one of the cats has decided that trying to climb ON it is his new favorite interest, the lid is see through so this doesn't help his curiosity - the lid is not too certain this is a good idea. Even if I move the Betta to a bigger setup I won't have that tank for several days.
 

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If I had that kind of basement setup I might consider that a much better option! As it is, if it falls through it's got a foot to go. Better than multiple floors but still worrisome on many levels.

All those tanks in one room must keep you very distracted. :)
I find myself staring over at them quite often, completely forgetting what I was working on, if anything at all given my desire to watch the fish.

Today I have to figure out what to do with the 5 gallon much sooner than I expected because one of the cats has decided that trying to climb ON it is his new favorite interest, the lid is see through so this doesn't help his curiosity - the lid is not too certain this is a good idea. Even if I move the Betta to a bigger setup I won't have that tank for several days.
Even only a foot drop will smash a tank and do damage to the structure under it. But like you said your putting in a 45 gallon and there really is no reason (unless there is no support under the tank ) to even be worried. Having a few tanks in the office is not as distracting as you may think . Each one of my betta tends to watch me work. They love just hovering and watching. Yes I do stop at times to watch what they are up to. (When my drivers come into my office they all stand there looking over the heard before they tell me why they are in my office. ( some of them just come in to see if I added any more fish.) (I have my own fleet of over the road trucks)

As for your cat and the getting on top of the tank. If you really want to see a very funny reaction and I know the cat would never get on it ever again take the top off and your betta out of it and let the cat jump on top of it. You will have one very wet scared cat. And I know he /she will never get on it again. But film it s it happens and you will enjoy that video for a life time. And only take the lid off and the fish out with out the cat ever seeing it. NO, Ok then take clear little rolls of packing tape about 2 inches in length and stick them to the top of the tank. Cats do not like it when they jump on something and they stick to it. It doesn't take long for them to get the message. (maybe a couple of times of getting stuck to learn this is no place I want to be compared to Taking the top off and them thinking nothing is wrong until they are chest deep in water which they will not come near again.) LOL
 

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Oh that's so cute and looks so familiar. Thankfully our lady feline friend just sits on the back of my chair and watches them swim about, all while purring. But the little ginger demon has been testing his limits. I should get some of that sticky tape again, we tried it years ago with a cat who decided sticky tape was just a challenge to scratch the doors harder and longer until he covered them in fur and they were worthless. Those were not easy to get off of the doors when we moved out of the apartment! Fur covered sticky tape. :)
This cat is not that stubborn. In face he's already backing off (this doesn't mean I'm buying the not gonna mess with the tank attitude).

(I even used some of those pots I found with Russ's recommendation to block his easy tank climbing access. Until I figure out another setup/spot for Ori's tank anyhow.)
 

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He does look like a hand full. LOL I know our other cat Nutmeg is 18 years old and is not inclined to do much of anything any more except climb up on us and get her scratches. She loves scratches. ( People not so much) LOL As she passes the tanks all she does is slow down and look. The movement attracts her to look, but that's it. Jack is a typical 2 year old and he loves to get into everything. He now gets up on my desk an d just stares at the fish. Until Mommy or I yell and then he gets down and goes to his box as if to say OK I'll be good, but I take a time out thank you. You could try a squirt bottle and every time you catch him up or even getting near the tank just soak his butt. Works with Jack and the Christmas Tree. LOL

Good looking tank by the way.
 

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Yeah he's not the craziest cat we've ever had, but he can be trouble. Sits there all quiet, cute and innocent until he decides to start climbing on top of it or knocking things over. Then he goes back to sleeping on the little comfy stand next to the tank.
But Skylar, our female kitty, just.. no big deal. Which I'm grateful for all things considered. Juggling two cats and their tank shenanigans would be too stressful for the fish.

And thank you! Working on getting it to all live plants (only 1 silk left) until the larger tank arrives. :)
I ordered the 45 gallon and I'm debating between an upgraded 20-30 gallon for this smaller tank group. Felt like 60+ was just taking on too much. For now.
 

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Your on the right track. take it slow and easy, and you won't have any problems. Don't second guess your self, ask all the questions and get your answers and then give it your very best. I know you'll do just fine and your tanks will be beautiful.
 
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