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Hi!

I have two bettas in their own 1.75 gallon tanks. I have been adding enough betta safe to condition their partial water changes:

-1/3 of the water is about 4 cups from each tank, making eight total in the bucket, so I add about 4 or 5 drops into there (instructions say 7 drops per gallon).

Should I be adding enough conditioner for the entire two betta tanks? Or just enough to condition the water change?

P.S. I also saw on another forum that it eliminates ammonia as well. Is this true? I looked on their website and it was sparsely mentioned, but isn't specifically listed on their product description on the bottle.
 

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Nothing actually eliminates ammonia, there are a few products that can bind it to a safer form for a while, but nothing get's rid of ammonia except for the good bacteria that comes in when you cycle a tank :)

If you want to get something that is a lot easier to dose and that WILL actually bind the ammonia to a safe level for 24-48 hours, I suggest looking at SeaChem's Prime. The conditioner is a little more expensive than the run-in-the-mill conditioners like BettaSafe and such. However, one bottle is going to last you literally FOREVER! You use 1-2 drops per gallon and it binds up the ammonia so that your fish stay safe from it's toxicity for a while :)

Unfortunately Prime doesn't come with a dropper cap like some other conditioners do, Instead what I do is I don't take off the safety seal, but just poke a hole in the top so I can control the drops more or less and thus, it lasts literally forever. It's definitely recommended.

But to answer your question, you should add just enough conditioner for the new water you're putting in. So if you've got a 3 gallon bucket and it's full, you'll add 21 drops of your conditioner to that before adding it to your Betta tanks. You can condition for the total 1.75 gallons in their tanks and then pour the new water in and it will condition it as it goes, but I'm not overly fond of that method. It also depends on your source water too, if you've got lots of Chlorine in your water, I probably wouldn't do that. I have well water so no chlorine, so I can do that and the fish will be fine, but I wouldn't chance it with lots of chlorine is all. It's up to you in the end of what you want to do, I generally just suggest to condition the new water since you'll save on your water conditioner.
 

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+1 Seachem Prime. I've had to do two fish-in cycles (but I prefer fish-less pure the ammonia cycling method) and have used Prime daily. Have had no issues with the bettas (no fin rot/ammonia burns and no gasping for air from nitrite constricting oxygen in the blood). Its a great product, I'd strongly recommend it.
For options to dose Prime consider needle-less syringes (eventually the rubber stopper will get stuck and you'll need a new one-takes several months to get to that point)
http://www.amazon.com/Syringe-Luer-...1432738123&sr=8-1&keywords=needleless+syringe
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-ADVANTAGE...737?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item463a4f1801

or plastic pipets (flimsy plastic but have held up so far, a little harder to get exact measurement with-takes a steady hand)
http://www.ebay.com/itm/3ml-Graduat...651?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a4b4f21e3
http://www.amazon.com/Piping-Rock-H...?ie=UTF8&qid=1432738178&sr=8-2&keywords=pipet


1cc=1ml, 1 ml is used for 10g so a 1g tank takes 0.1cc/ml according to the Seachem bottle for general dechlorination, up to 5x the amount used to dechloriante can be used to bind ammonia (again according to the bottle), the drop count method mentioned above also works well.
 
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