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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hmmm not great. Although I trust forum reviewers more than all those amazon people!
I definitely wouldn't use it to replace testing. It would more serve as a warning if the cycle crashed. Although I also have a nerite who escapes when there's readable ammonia...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wonder if it's maybe more effective in saltwater. Anybody you know use it in freshwater?
 

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I used to use them (FW). They worked very well, but they are for cycle tanks NOT cycling tanks. The scale is much smaller - I believe 0.5 ppm is as high as it goes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
good to know. my tank is cycled now it might be useful. if the scale is that small i'll know if something is wrong faster!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks DB! I would definitely use it more as a notification that something is wrong, as it can't replace the testing and obviously doesn't do nitrites and nitrates anyway.
 

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Have them in both of my tanks think it is a great tool. What is great about them is that it only detects NH3 the toxic component of ammonia. All the test kits, test for total ammonia which is NH3 and NH4 combined. The lowest color is <.02 ppm. the highest is .5 ppm. If your water gets to .5 ppm NH3 your fish is probably dead in a couple of hours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm pretty much convinced! Thanks for all of the help everyone!

Everybody had something to say about the ammonia one. Anybody try the pH one? Does it make that much of a difference if the alkalinity in my tank is good?
 

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Rollo is right. According to this calculator, if your free ammonia is 0.5ppm @8.0pH, @ 80*, your total ammonia (what API measures) is 8.0ppm. That means seriously injured if not dead fish.

CNYKOI - Ammonia calculator

The pH tester just measures the excess hydrogen ions (H+) in the tank. Alkalinity should have no bearing on that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well like I've been saying, it'll be more of an alert since my tank is cycled. Realistically it should be staying in the happy little 0 zone. The idea is that it will catch something that a weekly liquid test may not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
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Rollo is right. According to this calculator, if your free ammonia is 0.5ppm @8.0pH, @ 80*, your total ammonia (what API measures) is 8.0ppm. That means seriously injured if not dead fish.

CNYKOI - Ammonia calculator
Were I found it especially useful is when you are doing an in fish cycle. You know you are going to have to carry some ammonia. When I did my one tank I was testing for total ammonia on a daily basis and checking with a calculator, but still was comforting to have the alert in there as it's a constant indication. when it was just changing from "Safe" (< 0.02 ppm NH3) to "Alert" (0.05 ppm NH3) is when I would do the water changes. Next are "Alarm" (0.2 ppm NH3) and Toxic (0.5 ppm NH3) these last two your fish should NEVER be subjected to.
 

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IIRC, the ammonia alerts only show free ammonia.
 

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I've had a couple of these for my smaller tanks I don't cycle. I love em. I'd still do water changes on a schedule when using them, but I'm human and occasionally procrastinate. These alert things keep procrastination in check, since if I saw the middle circle with a green tinge, I knew I had to get it done that day... not tomorrow :p

Just be sure to peel off the little film thing on the front, and don't touch the circle with your hands. These two things are cause for occasional bad reviews on them, but other than that, I have found them to be very reliable.

I don't see much point in the Ph monitor thing, since typically, your Ph is what it is, and stays there.
 
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This was copied from the Seachem "Alert" page:

"As little as 0.02 mg/L of free ammonia will produce a greenish hue on the detector surface. .... In freshwater at pH 7.0, this corresponds to 3.6 mg/L total ammonia."

If mg/L=ppm, that's a lot higher than I want my fish subjected to. And, according to the CNYKOI conversion table, that 3.6ppm is nominally correct.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
This was copied from the Seachem "Alert" page:

"As little as 0.02 mg/L of free ammonia will produce a greenish hue on the detector surface. .... In freshwater at pH 7.0, this corresponds to 3.6 mg/L total ammonia."

If mg/L=ppm, that's a lot higher than I want my fish subjected to. And, according to the CNYKOI conversion table, that 3.6ppm is nominally correct.
That may be true, but in a cycled tank where if you only test weekly to make sure everything is alright, seeing that free ammonia reading would be a sign for immediate action that may otherwise have gone unnoticed until the next test.
 
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