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Discussion Starter #1
So last night as I was giving my bettas their pellets, I accidently dropped 2 pellets that were stuck together into the tank, and Adonis grabbed it and tried to eat it. I have seen him choke on these before, he'd keep his gills way out, then "cough" and spit them out. This time he did not.

He has been laying on the bottom of the tank since last night, heavy breathing through his mouth and gills. There was nothing else that could be causing this that I know of.

I have tried poking him in hopes of scaring it out of him, I have tried a mirror as suggested in other threads, but nothing is working. He will only swim to the top then fall back down headfirst.
 

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bro hes dying r.i.p
That was not a nice thing to say.

Well he's been doing for 2 entire days, I have no idea what to do with him :(
Pellets break down into mush after only a moment or two, so it's not the food. There's something else going on with your fish.


If you could please fill out this form (don't leave a single thing out) and if you can please include a few clear up-close photo's, or a video uploaded to YouTube. The more questions in the form that you answer, the easier and faster it will be for someone to assist you.

Housing:
  1. How many gallons is your tank?
  2. How long has the tank been set up?
  3. Does it have a filter? If so, how long has it been cycled?
  4. Does it have a heater?
  5. What temperature is your tank?
  6. Does your tank have an air stone or other type of aeration?
  7. Does your Betta have tank mates? What kind?
  8. Is the tank heavily planted?
  9. Was anything new recently introduced to the tank? If so what was it?
Food:
  1. What food brand do you use?
  2. Do you feed flakes or pellets?
  3. Freeze-dried?
  4. How often do you feed your Betta, and how much?
Maintenance:
  1. Before your Betta became ill how often did you perform a water change?
  2. If you have gravel substrate how often did you vacuum before your fish became ill?
  3. If you answered yes to having a filter; before your fish became ill how often did you perform filter maintenance (cleaning)?
  4. What percentage of water did you change before your fish became ill?
  5. What dechlorinator do you use?
  6. Do you share tank gear between tanks (nets, water changing buckets, gravel vacs etc.)?
  7. Do you use any additional additives? If so, what specifically do you use and why? (ie; pH Down, PhosGuard, algeacides etc.)
Water Parameters:
Which brand of liquid test kit(s) do you use?
What are your water parameters? Please give exact numerical numbers. Test results should be from the tank the fish was in when it became ill. Preferably, the test should be done 24 hours after the last water change.

Ammonia:
Nitrite:
Nitrate:
pH:

Symptoms and Treatment:
  1. When did you first notice the symptoms?
  2. How has your Betta’s appearance changed?
  3. How has your Betta’s behavior changed?
  4. Is your Betta still eating?
  5. Have you started treating your Betta? If so, how? List medications if any.
  6. Does your Betta have any history of being ill?
  7. How long have you owned your Betta?
  8. Was he or she a rescue (was he/she sick when you got him)?
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
That was not a nice thing to say.



Pellets break down into mush after only a moment or two, so it's not the food. There's something else going on with your fish.


If you could please fill out this form (don't leave a single thing out) and if you can please include a few clear up-close photo's, or a video uploaded to YouTube. The more questions in the form that you answer, the easier and faster it will be for someone to assist you.

Housing:
  1. How many gallons is your tank?
  2. How long has the tank been set up?
  3. Does it have a filter? If so, how long has it been cycled?
  4. Does it have a heater?
  5. What temperature is your tank?
  6. Does your tank have an air stone or other type of aeration?
  7. Does your Betta have tank mates? What kind?
  8. Is the tank heavily planted?
  9. Was anything new recently introduced to the tank? If so what was it?
Food:
  1. What food brand do you use?
  2. Do you feed flakes or pellets?
  3. Freeze-dried?
  4. How often do you feed your Betta, and how much?
Maintenance:
  1. Before your Betta became ill how often did you perform a water change?
  2. If you have gravel substrate how often did you vacuum before your fish became ill?
  3. If you answered yes to having a filter; before your fish became ill how often did you perform filter maintenance (cleaning)?
  4. What percentage of water did you change before your fish became ill?
  5. What dechlorinator do you use?
  6. Do you share tank gear between tanks (nets, water changing buckets, gravel vacs etc.)?
  7. Do you use any additional additives? If so, what specifically do you use and why? (ie; pH Down, PhosGuard, algeacides etc.)
Water Parameters:
Which brand of liquid test kit(s) do you use?
What are your water parameters? Please give exact numerical numbers. Test results should be from the tank the fish was in when it became ill. Preferably, the test should be done 24 hours after the last water change.

Ammonia:
Nitrite:
Nitrate:
pH:

Symptoms and Treatment:
  1. When did you first notice the symptoms?
  2. How has your Betta’s appearance changed?
  3. How has your Betta’s behavior changed?
  4. Is your Betta still eating?
  5. Have you started treating your Betta? If so, how? List medications if any.
  6. Does your Betta have any history of being ill?
  7. How long have you owned your Betta?
  8. Was he or she a rescue (was he/she sick when you got him)?
Housing:
  1. How many gallons is your tank? 10
  2. How long has the tank been set up? Atleast 5 months, however recently his old tank cracked and it's contents and a small amount of it's water was moved to a new tank. My other betta is using the heater that came with the tank and is fine.
  3. Does it have a filter? If so, how long has it been cycled?
    Atleast 4 months.
  4. Does it have a heater?
    Yes
  5. What temperature is your tank?
    79f
  6. Does your tank have an air stone or other type of aeration?
    No, only movement from the filter
  7. Does your Betta have tank mates? What kind?None
  8. Is the tank heavily planted? Only silk plants
  9. Was anything new recently introduced to the tank? If so what was it?
    A tank decoration (mushroom)
    Used, but cleaned tank.
Food:
  1. What food brand do you use? elive betta Bites
  2. Do you feed flakes or pellets? Pellets
  3. Freeze-dried? No
  4. How often do you feed your Betta, and how much? 1-2 pellets a day, 4-5 times a week
Maintenance:
  1. Before your Betta became ill how often did you perform a water change? Once every 1-2 weeks
  2. If you have gravel substrate how often did you vacuum before your fish became ill? Once every 1-2 weeks
  3. If you answered yes to having a filter; before your fish became ill how often did you perform filter maintenance (cleaning)? I had cleaned gunk off of the filter media a week before
  4. What percentage of water did you change before your fish became ill? 75%
  5. What dechlorinator do you use? Big Al's multipurpose Aquarium Conditioner
  6. Do you share tank gear between tanks (nets, water changing buckets, gravel vacs etc.)? Water changing buckets, gravel vacs
  7. Do you use any additional additives? If so, what specifically do you use and why? (ie; pH Down, PhosGuard, algeacides etc.) AQ salt, Sulfaplex
Water Parameters:
Which brand of liquid test kit(s) do you use? API ammonia test, Aquachek
What are your water parameters? Please give exact numerical numbers. Test results should be from the tank the fish was in when it became ill. Preferably, the test should be done 24 hours after the last water change.
Free chlorine (ppm): 0.5
Ammonia: .25 ppm
Nitrite:
Nitrate:
pH: 8.4ppm

Symptoms and Treatment:
  1. When did you first notice the symptoms? Wednesday night, 2 days ago
  2. How has your Betta’s appearance changed? His colours seem more dull, gills are slightly flared.
  3. How has your Betta’s behavior changed? He went from being very alert to laying on the bottom of the tank and being unable to swim right.
  4. Is your Betta still eating? No
  5. Have you started treating your Betta? If so, how? List medications if any.
  6. Does your Betta have any history of being ill? He has had issue with fin rippage but he has been healing well.
  7. How long have you owned your Betta? 4-5 months
  8. Was he or she a rescue (was he/she sick when you got him)? No

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hs8Rr0gpjik&feature=youtu.be
    Video of his behavior

 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have done that, I only added about a quarter of the recommended dose because I put 2 tablespoons of AQ salt in when I changed it half a week ago.
 

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If there is ammonia present in the tank, your tank is not cycled. Do many small water changes to remove the ammonia.

I'm not familiar with the water conditioner, but most conditioners will remove the chlorine from tap water. If free chlorine is the same thing as chlorine, then this might be your problem. You can change the water conditioner to Seachem Prime.

Also, is there any reason you are adding AQ salt and Sulfaplex?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If there is ammonia present in the tank, your tank is not cycled. Do many small water changes to remove the ammonia.

I'm not familiar with the water conditioner, but most conditioners will remove the chlorine from tap water. If free chlorine is the same thing as chlorine, then this might be your problem. You can change the water conditioner to Seachem Prime.

Also, is there any reason you are adding AQ salt and Sulfaplex?
I use Aquarium salt during water changes to help keep them calm, and I have been using sulfaplex as suggested by my LFS because of this clear slime that I assume is a fungal growth. So far it has helped that, although minutely.

It /should/ be cycled, he has been living with that filter for many months now.
 

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You can stop adding the aquarium salt. It is not intended for long periods of use. While I have not yet found any scientific studies to indicate that aquarium salt harms the labyrinth organ, many aquarists feel that it does. Better to err on the side of caution and dicontinue it's use. If you were using it specifically to replace lost electrolytes then it's much safer to use Kordon Fish Protector instead. It also calms fish during times of illness and during water changes. It's safe enough to use with each and every water change.

Continue with the SulfaPlex until you've completed the full course treatment according to the directions (as with most sulfa drugs you have to finish the treatment fully, otherwise the illness that you're treating will come right back). Make absolutely certain you're not using this medication with any other medications.

Either your dechlorinator is faulty or the chlorine test strips you're using are faulty because you should not have any chlorine in the water. I would take a sample of your tank water to your local fish store and have them test it for chlorine/chloramine (be sure they're not using the same test you're using).

When you test for ammonia, are you waiting 24 hours after your last water change before you perform the test? If not, please try that and get back to us with the results. Also ensure that you've cleaned your filter media in a bucket of clean dechlorinated water (not used tank water, and not untreated tap water). If there's a buildup of rotting organics in the media it can cause an ammonia and/or nitrite reading even if the tank is showing nitrate.

It is impossible to tell weather or not the tank is cycled unless you also test for nitrite and nitrate. You have no plants, so after 4 months your test results should be reading 0 ppm ammonia, 0 ppm nitrite, and anywhere between 5 ppm to 40 ppm nitrate. 0 ppm ammonia/nitrite and between 5 to 40 ppm nitrate means the tank is cycled. No nitrate, no cycle.

A 10 gallon tank should be getting a weekly water change. A lot more than that if you don't know weather or not the tank is cycled.

I also recommend you move your fish to a small quarantine tank of no less than 1 gallon. You'll need an adjustable heater and a sponge filter powered by an air pump with a check valve.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I went to Big Al's today to have my water properly tested.
Aside from a bit of Ammonia, likely from having to drain just about all the water when I moved the tank, it is fine.
It is cycled.
I believe my test strips were faulty.

The guy actually said its one of the best betta tanks he's ever seen water wise, as most people don't really know what they should be doing with them.

It's not his tank doing it, I'm only left with choking.

He suggested not feeding or stressing him out, and helping digestion with AQ salt.
 

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Big Al's multipurpose Aquarium Conditioner
Big Al's Multi-Purpose Water Conditioner helps repair the damaged tissue of tropical fish and marine fish with a unique formula that contains aloe vera, nature's legendary first-aid plant. Dechlorinates source water and neutralizes chloramine, a detrimental sterilizing chemical compound which does not evaporate from water. Use Big Al's Multi-Purpose Water Conditioner when setting up an aquarium, changing water, and adding new fish. Aids in the healing of skin wounds, torn or damaged fins and fish that have been damaged due to injury or disease.
Change the water conditioner to Seachem Prime.

Chlorine in water reacts with living tissues and organic matter causing acute necrosis (cell death) in fish. Since fish gills are sensitive and exposed directly to the aquatic environment, gill necrosis can lead to respiratory difficulty and asphyxiation. Most municipal water companies sterilize their water with chlorine or chloramine, a combination of chlorine and ammonia, for safe human consumption. While relatively harmless to humans, chlorine can be deadly to fish. The amount of chlorine in tap water may fluctuate, but it is usually between 0.5 and 2.0 parts per million (ppm). Chlorine poisoning is usually caused by inexperienced fish hobbyists either putting fish in unconditioned common tapwater, or displacing a large amount of tank water with unconditioned chlorinated water. One common scenario is when a koi or goldfish pond owner "tops off" his pond and forgets to turn off the garden hose. Too much unconditioned water gets into the pond and the fish die. Even unrinsed chlorine sterilized utensils (nets, sponges, filters) may can cause acute high morbidity and mortality. Chlorine poisoned fish appear very stressed and how quickly they get sick and die depends on the level of chlorine in the water. High levels may cause fish to succumb in hours or even minutes. Generally speaking, smaller fish are more susceptible than larger fish. Affected fish may appear pale and covered in mucus. Some will exhibit hyperemia (redness) on various parts of their body and behaviorally, fish may be piping at the surface for air and swimming erratically. Chlorine can be "bubbled" out of water if the water is well aerated for several days in a container with a large surface area. Unlike straight chlorine, chloramine does not produce trihalomethanes that are toxic to humans, which is why it has become much more popular than chlorine in public water supplies. Chloramine is more stable in water than chlorine and cannot be efficiently bubbled out of standing water. Regarding diagnosis, many toxic conditions resemble chlorine poisoning (ammonia, copper, organophosphates). An accurate history will usually rule these other problems out. Hypoxia due to overcrowding or poor aeration can also resemble chlorine toxicity. There are a number of manufacturers that make chlorine test kits. Sophisticated water testing laboratories have a device called a chlorine titrimeter. In most cases chlorine toxicity can be diagnosed by the history and clinical signs alone. Veterinary Care Severely affected fish usually die. Fish that are quickly removed from contaminated water may survive if they are not showing signs of respiratory distress within a three to six hour period following exposure. To try to fix the situation, the contaminated water must be neutralized immediately, or the fish must be removed to an aquarium or other vessel containing clean, chlorine-free water. A number of commercially available compounds quickly and safely remove chlorine from water. These products frequently contain sodium thiosulfate which inactivates chlorine through a chemical reaction in which sodium chloride is formed. Sodium thiosulfate is inexpensive, effective and safe (just ten grams of sodium thiosulfate will remove the chlorine from 1000 liters of municipal water with chlorine concentrations as high as 2.0 ppm). After the chlorine has been removed, the water containing the fish should be aerated well with room air or preferably 100 percent oxygen. Temperate species like goldfish and koi will benefit from reducing the water temperature to increase the dissolved oxygen levels. When possible or practical, administering dexamethasone intravenously or intracoelomically at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg every 12 hours may improve the prognosis. Follow-up Care Since chlorine poisoning is almost always an acute problem, follow-up consists primarily of supportive care for the sick fish and prevention with regards to keeping chlorinated water away from the fish. Read more at: https://tr.im/f1YbI
 
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