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What should I breed a delta tail with? (Most desirable fry)

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Discussion Starter #1
1: Can the fry eat baby brine shrimp as their first meal?
2: Can I hatch the brine shrimp without an air pump?
3: Can I try limiting the number of eggs the pair lays?
4: I have read that the fry will be OK in colder temperatures and if there is no heater in the tank they will just grow up to be cold tolerant, is this true? BTW I read about this in The Betta Handbook.
5: When culturing infusoria do I have to add a type of culture? Or just lettuce, aquarium water and aquarium gravel?

Separate question: What fry would be most desirable? Delta tail×CT? Delta tail×Elephant ear? Delta tail×Koi betta?

Thanks!
 

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1. I've always fed my fry bbs for their first meal and they always ate them but just monitor them for a bit to make sure that they are eating when you first introduce the bbs
2. I don't think it's possible to hatch bbs without an air pump but I just use the same air pump that I use for my sponge filter (the pump has 2 outlets and I split them into 4 using t connectors) (I just made my own hatchery that floats in my grow out tank so I don't need another heater)
3. You can't exactly limit the amount of eggs. Maybe if you condition the female for a shorter amount of time but they she might not be ready to breed so I wouldn't recommend doing that.

I've never kept DT bettas but what tail type do you mean when you say koi betta?
 

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I've never bred, but I distinctly remember a spawn log from a member here who tried to raise fry without a heater- they were very disappointed with the results. Without a heater (Or naturally high temps) the fry will grow much slower than fry kept warm, and will be more susceptible to infection while they grow because of their lowered metabolisms.

Breeding a "cold tolerant" betta would take multiple generations at least and frankly I don't know if it's possible- they have evolved in tropical conditions and I don't think a few spawns in lukewarm water is going to change their basic needs.

I am sure it's possible to raise fry without warm temps, but I wouldn't do it. Fry are so delicate I'd want to give them as much help to grow healthy as I could, and I don't encourage keeping adult bettas at room temp if there are other options so I definitely wouldn't recommend it for fry.


Instead of limiting the number of eggs laid, you can cull them after they're in the nest, or once the fry start to hatch. However from what I understand most new breeders end up with very small spawns surviving to adulthood no matter how many eggs there are at first, so I wouldn't worry too much about limiting their numbers- nature will do that for you as you learn.


Only one of the options you listed is actually a tail type- CT, which would result in messy fins for the fry. Koi is a very popular color pattern right now, but any tail type can have that color (And I don't know the genetics enough to know how likely it is to get Koi fry if the other parent is another color anyway). Similarly, Elephant Ear only refers to the pectoral fins, not the tail- any betta can be EE.

My understanding is that 99% of the time, and especially for new breeders who don't have the facilities to take care of multiple generations, it's best to breed the same tail types together. So Delta x Delta or Halfmoon (The difference between DT and HM is only a matter of spread), or Plakat x PK, etc. Mixing for example DT x PK would result in fins that are all uneven lengths, so the fry might look nice while they're young but when they're fully grown they won't be either DT or PK, and trying to breed them back to either standard can take multiple generations.



I'd encourage you to download the IBC Show Standards booklet, and read through it to learn what the differences are between tail types and colors, as well as general "good form". That will help you decide if you have a betta which is really "worthy" to be bred, and help you find a match for them. Breeding pet store bettas if you intend to keep all the fry yourself is fine, but if you have any plans to sell them now or in the future, you really want to do the research.

 

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Confirming above answers;
1. Yes
2. No
3. Yes, either remove female before the deed is done or remove some eggs after spawning is completed. Culling fry after they hatch is another option. But what's the point. Beginners usually produce less than 100 to adult.
4. No. . . . Not in the way, I think, you have in mind. Too low, slow growth. Too high, relatively faster growth. BOTH prone to diseases or low immune systems.

It is possible to adapt them to lower (not drastically low) temperatures, though low success rate. You will have to rely on "survival of the fittest" where very few will survive. As Rana explained, it will take several generations.

5. Not really. Old aquarium or other bacteria infested water is the "starter". Bacteria from filter media works better than just aquarium water.

6. To avoid confusion;
DT = double tail
DeT = delta tail
EE refers to the size of pectoral fins, not fin type.
Koi refers to color pattern - resembles the koi carp.

I agree with Rana; unless you are breeding for a line, intend to create specific traits, OR have no other choices, it is best to breed the same fin types.
 

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I started with bbs right off the bat for my fry and they did great. It's also easy to see if they're eating cup their bellies turn orange, just avoid overfeeding.
Definitely need an air pump for the bbs hatchery. I made my own like CameronsBettas did. Its a big plastic bottle sitting in a separate heated tank.
I'd be wary about removing the female before all her eggs are dropped. The extra eggs would probably absorb back into her body which is normal but I think holding excess eggs caused my previous female Flitter health problems that eventually led to her death. Now I may be completely wrong but with my experience I'd let the female drop all the eggs.
I'd have serious worries about stunted growth caused by fry living in cooler temperatures.
I think I removed the father and gave the fry their first meal 2-3 days after they started hatching, once they were all free swimming for certain. Because the previous spawn I may have removed the father too soon.
 

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Feed fry as soon as they sre free swimming.

I usually "call" fry by vibrating chopstick or finger on water surface. Once most fry gather, I release their food. Especially in bigger tanks, this method ensures most fry is near food so they don't need much effort to "hunt" and I don't over feed too much.
 
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