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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I know the basics about the Nitrogen cycle but wanted someone to explain it more thoroughly. I have heard that it is: Growing bacteria in a tank that turns ammonia to nitrite to nitrate. Is this correct? What is the best way to cycle a tank (in your opinion)? If there is already a thread explaining what the Nitrogen cycle is and how it works THOROUGHLY then please post the link. All your answers are greatly appreciated.

Thank you!

(Just to be clear: I don't want to know how to cycle a tank, just about how the Nitrogen cycle works, and what the best methods are for cycling to you.)
 

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Your understanding of the nitrogen cycle is correct. There are three "cycling" stickies at the top of the "Betta Fish Bowls Habitats and Accessories" section of this forum which contain more information. If you'd like deeper background, PM me.

Opinions vary as to which is the best cycling method. I feel it depends on what you intend to do with the tank.

-- For a heavily-stocked community tank, where a shoal of many fish may be stocked all at one time, or for larger fish, the "fishless" cycle is preferred in order to grow a large colony of nitrifying bacteria to handle the high bioload.

-- For a low bioload tank for just a single Betta and maybe a few shrimp or a snail the fish-in method is much simpler, easier and convenient. Using Prime or other modern ammonia-detoxifying conditioner, makes this a safe option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Your understanding of the nitrogen cycle is correct. There are three "cycling" stickies at the top of the "Betta Fish Bowls Habitats and Accessories" section of this forum which contain more information. If you'd like deeper background, PM me.

Opinions vary as to which is the best cycling method. I feel it depends on what you intend to do with the tank.

-- For a heavily-stocked community tank, where a shoal of many fish may be stocked all at one time, or for larger fish, the "fishless" cycle is preferred in order to grow a large colony of nitrifying bacteria to handle the high bioload.

-- For a low bioload tank for just a single Betta and maybe a few shrimp or a snail the fish-in method is much simpler, easier and convenient. Using Prime or other modern ammonia-detoxifying conditioner, makes this a safe option.
Thank you! :)
 

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Reference Team
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Municipal water supplies in most cities use chloramine as an antibacterial to protect people from bacterial disease/contagion. This chemical is harmful, even deadly, to aquarium livestock. Chloramine is a combination of chlorine and ammonia.

Modern water conditioners split this molecule and remove the deadly chlorine. Some, but not all, then detoxify the remaining ammonia, usually by locking it up temporarily in a harmless molecule. Prime, Stresscoat, AmmoLock, Amguard, API conditioner and a few others do this. If a conditioner does not advertise its ability to detoxify ammonia, then it probably doesn't. It's an important feature, one they would brag about.
 
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