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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I put some Cory Catfish in my tank with my Betta Mr. McGlubbin, and yesterday was their first day together (4 cats). At first he was a bit nippy but today he doesnt seem interested in them at all! So this thread is going to be a little diary almost to share if anything happens or if you guys have any info to offer!

Cheers! Will post some pictures of the community tank in a bit
1 ghost shrimp
2 Black peppered Corys
2 Green Corys
1 Mr. McGlubbin Betta
 

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What size tank is this? You should keep just one species of cory and have a group fo 6 minimum, aka all pepper cory. They are shoaling fish and should be in a proper group of their own kind to reduce stress. But if you don't have the proper size tank you should not be keeping any cory.
 

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I don't agree totally with aqua aurora's comment about "if you don't have the proper sized tank you should not be keeping any cory".

Yes many cory species do do better with same types (eg panda cories will die of loneliness without members of their own kind). And they are not as shy or nervous with minimum numbers. I would suggest that you take a look at the reference section on this site regarding the catfish species. It has a lot of good information.

And it is a good rule of thumb to have 1 gal for every inch of fish. So yours may be slightly overstocked. However, I have a 20 gal planted tank with 3 c. aeneus orange lazer , 1 c. aeneus (regular coloured fish), 2 bronchis splendens (first was a mistake and I got the second in case he really did feel better with another of his own kind), and 5 lemon tetra. So my tank is a little over stocked (125%). I had my cories before the bronchis and they were shy and hid under the driftwood most of the time. Since getting the bronchis, all of my cories and bronchis have been swimming around more and not hiding unless I startle them, so I think that they are comfortable.

A planted tank does help with slight overstocking as it helps with maintaining the water parameters. As well, keeping up with regular water changes helps. So if you are good with this, then your fish should be ok. Don't know if you have any hiding spots for your cories, but all species like a piece of driftwood or something to hide under. And they will love to hide in your plants.

You may consider upping the size of your tank, but I don't know how much experience you have with fishkeeping nor how comfortable you are with your knowledge. You don't have to do it immediately. I'm at a 20 gal and probably won't go bigger because of the space I have and comfort level I have with the size. Good luck with your tank and enjoy your fish. If you have the space, the cories would enjoy a few more of each other, but don't put in more than the tank can handle. Hiding spots will help them to feel secure as well.
 

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I don't agree totally with aqua aurora's comment about "if you don't have the proper sized tank you should not be keeping any cory".
The commented you quoted was geared towards the possibility of it being a 2.5-5g range tank as there are many betta keepers with that size range, while dwarf/pygmy cory can live in a 5g, other cory species need a larger tank, some as much as a 55g. But I've seen people try to cram large cory breeds into a 2.5...

I'm glad its a 10g.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I don't agree totally with aqua aurora's comment about "if you don't have the proper sized tank you should not be keeping any cory".

Yes many cory species do do better with same types (eg panda cories will die of loneliness without members of their own kind). And they are not as shy or nervous with minimum numbers. I would suggest that you take a look at the reference section on this site regarding the catfish species. It has a lot of good information.

And it is a good rule of thumb to have 1 gal for every inch of fish. So yours may be slightly overstocked. However, I have a 20 gal planted tank with 3 c. aeneus orange lazer , 1 c. aeneus (regular coloured fish), 2 bronchis splendens (first was a mistake and I got the second in case he really did feel better with another of his own kind), and 5 lemon tetra. So my tank is a little over stocked (125%). I had my cories before the bronchis and they were shy and hid under the driftwood most of the time. Since getting the bronchis, all of my cories and bronchis have been swimming around more and not hiding unless I startle them, so I think that they are comfortable.

A planted tank does help with slight overstocking as it helps with maintaining the water parameters. As well, keeping up with regular water changes helps. So if you are good with this, then your fish should be ok. Don't know if you have any hiding spots for your cories, but all species like a piece of driftwood or something to hide under. And they will love to hide in your plants.

You may consider upping the size of your tank, but I don't know how much experience you have with fishkeeping nor how comfortable you are with your knowledge. You don't have to do it immediately. I'm at a 20 gal and probably won't go bigger because of the space I have and comfort level I have with the size. Good luck with your tank and enjoy your fish. If you have the space, the cories would enjoy a few more of each other, but don't put in more than the tank can handle. Hiding spots will help them to feel secure as well.
I have heard of this before, and I have also heard that per cory it should just be a gallon. So I honestly was attempting to under stock the tank. What would be a sign that I was over stocking the tank?
 

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There are many cories of varying sizes, as noted by aqua aurora. All fish in a tank need to be considered when figuring out stock. Your betta also counts toward the load that your aquarium can handle.

Unfortunately, I don't know if there is an immediate sign that an aquarium would be overstocked. All fish need their room, and having a betta that swims at the top of the tank and cories that keep mainly to the bottom is one factor when stocking a tank, meaning that that combo is good for spacing. But you also have to remember that fish are using the oxygen that is carried in the water, they are living in an enclosed environment which needs to be kept clean for them (they eat and pee in their living space). Some fish should live only with others of their own kind, some are fast swimmers while others are slow. Many factors can make a tank overstocked. The fish become stressed and then become sick and then can die.

I'm not intending to scare you from your hobby. You haven't done anything that can't be made better. Fish are reliant on you for all of their care. An overstocked tank can make for an unhappy experience and is much more difficult with upkeep. You want to enjoy your fish.

Again, I urge you to check out the "reference material" tab. It has great information about many fish and their needs, sizes etc. It has information about aquarium plants, since you did mention that you have some in your tank. It has pictures. It helped me when I was trying to decide what fish I wanted to keep. I did try betta, but they didn't live long for me. I have had much better luck with my cories and tetras. I continue to refer to the reference section even now, whether it is to refresh my knowledge or just to dream of what fish I would like if I had the space.

And this site has great people who will also answer any specific questions that you have, so use everything that is available to you to learn how to make your fish happy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Honestly, my betta couldnt be happier haha, he acts like a dog when i walk in. I think he isnt stressed. The corys seem to swim a good bit and they dont just lay around ALL the time. So i dont think they are stressed.
I will need to look at plants because i need to propagate my java fern and idk how to quite do it. And i have a peacock fern my betta loves, and it came without roots!
Thanks for all the help. Sorry you couldnt keep a betta to long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well here take a look at mine. It seems to be growing all kinds of little roots and leaflets. So on that note, WHAT THE HECK DO I DO WITH THEM?? Like the whole leaf is making other leaves... Picture in the feed
 

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Leave them to grow until the baby leaves are at least an inch or so big, then you can just pull them off and attach them to their own rocks and what-not. You may have to trim their roots as they can be messy if enough of them are growing from a single leaf.
I think the longer you can leave them the better though, at the moment they will be getting all their nutrients from the parent leaf, so if you pick them off too early it can take a while before they really start growing again.
Also, peacock ferns are not aquatic plants and will rot if kept fully submerged.
 

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Your cories will like hiding in a bunch of them. Have you seen your betta sleeping on the leaves yet? At night some fish like to rest on plant leaves.

Unless you have more java fern than you like, leave it. The older plants do eventually get ragged and brown and those can then be taken out.
 
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