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Discussion Starter #1
Hi im new to the fishkeeping world and the betta forums:)
Over the past few weeks ive done a ton of research for the new tank im getting for my bday!
I have brought a 105 litre (68 cm length,35 cm depth and 51 cm height) rectangle tank.
After all the research and visits to my local pet store pets at home I would like to keep these fish.
a male betta (don't know what exact type because they are constantly selling and bringing in new bettas)
5-6 albino corydoras (I have read they do well with bettas)
10-12 harlequin rasboras (I have also read these do ok and I am happy to go down a few if you think there is too many but I read they like big groups!)
1-2 yellow rabit snails
1-2 Vampire shrimp or giant African shrimp (now this is the one I was most unsure on because shrimp do well with bettas however these filter feed and bettas like slow water however would a compromise work? also I am prepared to feed my shrimp extra if hes not filter feeding as should be)
I have worked out a feeding schedule for all so I have done a fair bit of research but it be nice to hear your guys opinion as you most likely know more than me !)
thanks for taking your time to read this!
 

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RusselltheShihTzu
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Hi! And Welcome to the Forum!

Stocking sounds good except for a few of things:

Betta-based community tanks need to be heavily planted (silk if okay). This gives the Betta places to go for "quiet time." The saying in Bettadom is "If you can see your Betta at a glance the tank doesn't have enough plants." Rule of thumb is 75% planted in a community tank.

Do you intend to have live plants? If so, Rabbit Snails will eat many of them; especially small and young plants. I would look for something else. Trapdoor Snails are neat. Mystery Snails come in a plethora of interesting colors.

Vampire Shrimp are delicate and, like any shrimp or cray, should never be added to a tank until it is 8-12 weeks past being fully cycled. Even .50 ppm Ammonia can have disastrous effects. I had Larry the Vampire Shrimp for four years and am getting more in the Fall. Love them! You can feed them liquid Phytoplankton but a mature tank should provide everything they need. They also eat leftover food on the bottom.

If you want to really enjoy them, place something hollow against the front glass facing the inside of the tank so you can see in. The shrimp will use it as a hide and you can watch him. Otherwise, as shy creatures, it may find a place that is well-hidden.

It's actually not true that Betta like/need slow flow. People think that, it seems, because of how Wilds live. If the flow from the filter isn't enough to feed a filter feeder, it is probably not enough to oxygenate the water for the other fish. That is the what it takes to have a successful community tank: Accommodating everyone.

The only time filter flow is too much is if it blows the Betta all over the tank and/or the Betta doesn't have a calm place to rest or eat. Make sure the filter is adjustable.

I have found adding the bottom dwellers first when the tank has a resident Betta works best. They are far from the Betta's upper level "territory." If there are no issues, then introduce the middle-level fish like Rasbora. If you acclimate, do so in a dark tank so the Betta doesn't become frustrated. Leave lights off for at least an additional hour but more is better. Using SeaChem Stability helps compensate for the extra bioload when adding any tank mates.

You can add Betta first. If a Betta is not going to accept tank mates he's not going to except tank mates. Period. Order of introduction, IME, makes no difference.

My community tanks all have tanks between 77-78/25-24.5.

Hope this isn't TMI. I've had Betta-based community tanks for 40+ years. Since back in the day when everyone though Betta would kill anything added to their habitat. :rolleyes:

You are going to have such a fun time.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you so much for all the information!!
I am planning on having a heavily planted tank so I'm glad to hear it has many benefits.
I have brought a floating log for my bettas so it can sleep in there along with many hiding places with driftwood and rocks for the vampires aswell.
I may have to look into other snail breed but in my research I found they don't eat plants if they are fed well "in general, a well fed Rabbit Snail should not be interested in devouring live aquarium plants. It is said that an exception may be Java Ferns. Hobbyist often report that Rabbit Snails are interesting in eating Java Ferns. But other than Java Ferns, keeping Rabbit Snails well fed on a balanced diet of green leafy supplements, as well as keeping them with plants like Anubias with strong, durable leaves, plants should be relatively safe" that was from a yellow rabbit care guide so ill do some more reaserch on that!
I have noted to add the shrimp and snail last so my tank can mature and thanks for the tips on how to add my fish to the tanks.
I was thinking off cycling the tank for 2 weeks with testing every other day but im not sure so any advice would be great!
I will also watch the flow and make sure my vampires are feeding well and living good little lives and my betta to make sure he can swim around the tank gracefully like he should :)
I am now so exitced for my bday and this was defintley so much help (I eed or the help I can get from experts like you as im really new to the hobby!)
I will post some pics of my tank when I have the betta and all my fish good and going!
Thank you!
 

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RusselltheShihTzu
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My Rabbit Snails must have been an anomaly. ;) If a plant was young and tender or not heavily-stemmed it was demolished. They were rehomed to someone who had silk plants. Trust me, I can never be accused of underfeeding anything.

Do not always trust "care guides." Often they are written by professional writers who grab information and throw it together.

Here's a cycling guide. There's a difference between running and cycling. Here's the Forum's guide on fish-in cycling. I've never done fishless but the Forum has a guide on that, too.

 

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RusselltheShihTzu
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The fish are in while you are cycling. However, I would not try to cycle with the entire crew. Cycle with just the Betta. Add the other fish once it is cycled. Use SeaChem Stability to jump-start the cycle and again when adding new fish.

To avoid killing them, do not add any shrimp until the tank has been fully cycled for a minimum of two months. Shrimpers recommend longer. As I said before, shrimp are extremely sensitive to Ammonia and Nitrites; much more so than most fish.

You can also cycle without the fish. This is called fishless cycling. I believe there are instructions in the sticky section of either Betta Fish Care or Habitats, etc. Waiting to stock shrimp applies to either method.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Is cycling with fish dangerous to the beta?? because if ive just set the tank up and add the beta surely the water isn't ready yet? and which cycling is better or faster?:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
But if your using a fish to start the nitrogen cycle the harmful ammonia and nitrite will surely put the betta under a lot of stress or even kill it?thats the whole point of setting up the tank before putting fish in to make sure theres no harmful chemicals like ammonia or nitrite?
 

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RusselltheShihTzu
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As I said, I have never found fish-in cycling dangerous or harmful to any fish.

Products like Prime neutralize Ammonia and Nitrite and remove Chlorine and Chloramine. That is why the Forum tutorial specifically recommends Prime which "locks" NH3 (toxic "Free Ammonia") and renders it the harmless NH4 (Ammonium). Even if it didn't, .25 ppm of either Nitrite or Ammonia is not enough to stress or kill a Betta. It's long-term exposure to high levels (over 1.0 ppm) of such that is harmful.

The thing you can't do is just leave the tank running as that does nothing. You must cycle it (establish a nitrifying bacteria colony). The method is up to the owner.
 
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