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Hello, I am new to betta, and learning. I killed my first betta through ignorance and over feeding. I have a new betta, named Steve Carrell cause he's a silver fox. Lol He's only been here a few days. The aquarium is 2.5 gallons with the gentlest filter I could find and a heater keeping the tank about 80 degrees. I turn his light and filter off every night to give him a break.
I noticed this morning he's started a bubble nest and there's a fine film on top of the water. Is that ok? He seems happy enough, although not fond of his pellets. He spits them out(they aren't too big, i cut them in half first) and much prefers worms. Again, is THAT ok? I will be replacing the plastic plant this week for something softer because the plastic might tear his fins? Please don't crucify me, I am trying to learn.
Thank you. Video attached.
 

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Well no video, and No we would not crucify you. Welcome to the forum. We can not hold you in contempt for the death of your first betta. it seems as though you have learned enough to come to the right place and ask for help. That we will gladly do. First the sheen on the water could be from a number of things. From ;uncleaned plastic plants to the oil given off from the food you feed. It's no big deal so don't stress. First it will disappear when you do water changes. Seeing that the tank is new and it hasn't cycled yet Your water changes Until the tank is cycled should be every other day unless the ammonia, Nitrites, and nitrate is higher than acceptable levels. (water changes should be 25%)

If you haven't already done so It would be wise to invest in a test kit. API makes a reasonably priced kit. Using this kit you will notice that the ammonia test is NH3 and NH4 combined giving you a total ammonia reading. (It's the only bad test this kit has and it is the most important. GO FIGURE) However there is a saving grace to this problem. It is a SeaChem ammonia alert. You stick it in the tank on a glass side you can easily see and it will give you the NH3 readings (Toxic ammonia) It takes alot of your stress away when testing. It lasts a year and is accurate to a fault.

When the tank cycles and your test results are Ammonia 0 ppm Nitrite 0 ppm and nitrate between 5 and 20 ppm. for at least a week You know you have passed the greatest challenge. (OH I forgot to mention the fish still has to be alive( that's the important thing to have happen.))

As far as your feeding depending on the pellet size is depending on if he is eating. By the way betta have teeth. (yeah believe it) So even if they appear to be spitting out the pellet they are really just taking bits off they can eat. If you are feeding larger pellets you may want to pre-soak them to make it easier for your boy to chew. As far as blood worms are concerened It is fine for them to eat them. If your feeding live I would feed him as many as he can eat in 5 min. Or you could use the rounded belly approach. (feed enough that when you look down frome the top of him his belly is just slightly rounded. (not bursting.) Betta will over eat. As you already know.

Just keep doing your water changes test every day until the tank cycles and give him plenty of plants to play in (not plastic.( either silk or live.)) float some bunch plants on the surface and maybe a couple of broad leafed plants. to hide among or rest on. and you will be doing fine.

Make sure with your water changes the water is treated with a water conditioner (prime) and the Temp is the same as the water in the tank. (Two fery important things to remember,(get rid of heavy metals and chlorine and the temp being the same if not, colder temp added to the tank could cause ICK (this is not wanted).
 

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It's probably just what tends to be referred to in the hobby as a 'protein film', which is harmless, but unsightly. It tends to happen in tanks with very low surface agitation. You can manually remove it with a piece of paper towel. Increasing the surface agitation in your tank should break it up. Sponge filters are good at this, as they agitate the surface, but are still gentle enough that they won't blow your betta around the tank.

In regards to the pellets. It may be that he doesn't like that particular brand or variety. I've found some pellets are much harder than others, and my fish have struggled with them. Time and patience tends to be all that is needed to get a fish accepting pellets. A healthy fish won't starve if you withhold food for few days, and if it's hungry, it's more likely to accept food that it previously refused.

What sort of worms are you feeding? I assume bloodworms? If so, I'd prefer to feed my fish frozen over freeze-dried. Frozen seems to cause less problems with bloating.

Good luck with your newest betta. I've lost a more fish than I care to admit through ignorance and inexperience. This hobby can be a very steep learning curve.
 
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