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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi guys, i am new to having betta fish...so recently I got two new betta fish, both are veil tails type. One is red and one is violet-blue. I got them both for a pretty cheap price, I didn't really know much about betta fish i got them. So when i got home i realised that on the red one's tail there's a slight dark edge. At first I thought it's his birth characteristics, but then I m still really worried so i did some research on betta fish and then i realised that he's actually having a slight case of fin rot. After that, I have been changing water every day, 25% per day, I feed him once or twice per day, their diet is dried blood worms, it won't take anything else. I tried pellets, and flakes, that picky fish won't even try it. Anyways, so the fish with fin rot didn't get any better, so i decided to use some medicine i got. it's called "fish live"and it has a green shade to it, so when i apply it, the water will become slight green. right now my betta is still having fin rot, but the situation didn't get worse.
for the second betta with the healthy tail, it has an eating problem. I feed him dried blood worms and he would swim quickly towards it and eat it all, however, half a minute later he would spit the food out after he's chewed. why is he not eating?
one more thing, because my apartment is kinda small, i can only afford to keep 1/4 gallon tanks at home. so i got two of those tanks, and i got some furniture for the both of them and also some freshwater plants.
sigh i m really worried.
please help.:|:|:|:|
 

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Ok, so for the eating problems, you're going to have to fast them until they will eat the healthy stuff. Freeze-dried bloodworms is like feeding candy, and it will eventually cause health problems. Offer them 1 or 2 pellets every few days until they eat them. Don't worry, they can go many weeks without eating.
For the fin rot, keep the water clean and warm, and it will begin to heal itself. Betta fish are tropical and need a minimum of 76. A stable temperature between 76 and 82 is ideal for Betta fish. Anything colder than that, and it will eventually introduce serious health problems, including external parasites. Warmer than that, it they can die from heat exhaustion.
 

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Hey Fiesty!
So I have a few question and comments about your little friends!
I have seen a LOT of red bettas with black edging lately, I think it's probably just his coloration. Rot looks like... well, rot. It'll be dark dark black or grey, falling away in nasty bits... as opposed to a transparent, even black edging. Over medicating a fish just puts strain on their insides, and really does more harm than good. Are you able to post a picture for us of his tail?

As Saint said, they'll eat when they're hungry. I do occasionally feed my fish bloodworms, but only once or so a week. Not as a staple diet. The pellets may be to large for them to eat, try breaking them up, and see if that helps.

Now on to the 'controversial' issue - tank size. I personally would not keep a betta in 0.25G, but that is mainly because I do not have the time to do that daily care a tank that small needs, I also think they would be VERY hard to heat. The smallest heaters I could find heat my 1G perfectly, but would overheat a 0.25G.
If it's a monetary issue, you can get plastic 'kritter keepers' for very very cheap, I would suggest around 3G. If it is a space issue... I would REALLY try to make space for at least 1G. It will make your life so much easier, and the fish so much happier.

Now, if neither of those are possible, you need to be doing DAILY 100% water changes in 0.25G. The ammonia a fish produces builds up to toxic levels very quickly in tanks that small. Daily 25% changes are nice, but barely make a dent in the toxic levels of ammonia that are in there. It might also contribute to lack of appetite, lethargy, may cause fin rot... tons of issues.

Please feel free to ask ANY questions you have! We're here to help!
 

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I missed the quarter gallon tanks part. Yes, you will need to do daily 100% water changes in those tanks to keep them healthy, and to fight the fin rot. 25% is not going to help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for the reply! :)
well at the moment they seem to be doing fine, i mean they are making bubble nests and stuff. :>
anyways exams are coming up i will have to keep them there for about a few weeks before I can move them >-<
anyways, so pellets > flakes?
ps: re sainthogan: the edge is very thin...I doubt if it's coloration >_< but it never gets bigger or smaller.
 

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pellets are generally better than flakes. One, the cause less mess, and you don't have to suck as much gunk out of the bottom when ever it gets uneaten. And two, they generally, though not always, have more protein and less filler, and cause less bloating problems. Either way, look for a flake or pellet that is mostly fish based protein sources and very little filler stuff like wheat, yeast, rice, corn, etc.
 
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