Betta Fish Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've always been one of those people that got male Bettas, because they are so flowy and pretty, unlike their female counterpart...Or at least that's what I used to think.

After Poseidon died earlier this year, I had a 10 gallon tanks that only had Otos in it, so I wanted more fish. I wasn't and still not ready to get a new male Betta, I'm still broken up about Poseidon.

I recently got more fish, and one of these fish I wanted was a red fish, but there were none, till I thought, I want to name it My Lady, so what would be better than a female Betta? My friend found me one with a whitish/peach body and bright red fins. It was different not getting one of those brightly coloured, big finned male Bettas.

After getting her home, and letting her settle, I realized how BEAUTIFUL she really was. I had to go back to the same store, because I accidentally bought one fish that needs to be in a school, and while waiting for them I looked at the Betta cups next to be, and there she was, a beautiful black bodied, bright red fins female Betta. I freaked out and got her too.

I went to take a photo of her on the way home, but she turned a weird grey colour, and I was worried that the dim lights at the store made her look different. I got her home, and once she was settled her bright black and red came back.

I feel ashamed that I never wanted a female Betta before, of course when they are sitting in sad cups next to the males, where even the males look blah from their living condition, females are less appeasing. But how wrong I was to never give female Bettas a chance. They are beautiful in their own way, they shine just as much as the males.

And there is something my little black one did to me that no male Betta has ever done. I would usually spend a good hour trying to figure which male Betta to get. And even with My Lady, I was just looking for a red one. But Marinette, she grabbed my attention right a way, and I was not going to leave that store without her.

If you have never had a female Betta, and not sure if you ever want to, I'd say give it shot, I'm so happy I got both my girls. I wouldn't trade, return, or regret them.
This is My Lady, she's gotten more red than when we first met. She's pretty mellow.
Marinette, she's feisty, she doesn't really bother anyone, but shes does have a slight attitude.

They are both named after the same character. Ladybug from a cartoon called Miraculous Lady.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I love my females. I have to say I am quite taken by their sass and personality. They are my favorite fish, hands down.
I know exactly how you mean, My Lady and Marinette are the opposite but at the same time the same. I love how they each have their own personalities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Also, two females undivided is a recipe for disaster.... I would definitely recommend you get a divider in that 10gal.
There are multiple people who have sororities of female Bettas, that have no issues. If they start showing signs, then I'll be dividing them, but they are well together now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
630 Posts
Yes, I have a successful sorority.. Of 6 females in a 10gal that is heavily planted and they have no other tank mates.

I speak from experience that what you are doing is a bad idea. But they are your fish, so do what you do. I would just hate to see them in the memorial section later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Yes, I have a successful sorority.. Of 6 females in a 10gal that is heavily planted and they have no other tank mates.

I speak from experience that what you are doing is a bad idea. But they are your fish, so do what you do. I would just hate to see them in the memorial section later.
How can I have a successful sorority if I don't try?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
630 Posts
You can't have a successful sorority if you do not do proper prior research to understand how they work. It is not a beginner tank. Divide your girls, put time into researching how to do it properly and then try. But don't think you can just toss females together all willy nilly and not have some loss of life.

There are two ways to learn a lesson. You pick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,768 Posts
But don't think you can just toss females together all willy nilly and not have some loss of life.
Especially if you put them in separately, The Betta you put in first will see the new fish as a trespasser and they will fight, and in a small lightly planted tank it will be over fast and one or both fish will be injured and die. The stronger female will show no mercy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,895 Posts
What usually (I'm not going to say always) happens when you keep females in pairs (or even trios) is that the most aggressive or dominant fish starts to bully the weaker female. Often the bullying starts off subtle, but eventually progresses to physical attacks. However, intimidation and 'psychological warfare' can cause a great deal of stress for the fish on the receiving end. Constant stress can weaken the immune system of fish, and leave them more susceptible to disease.

Larger numbers means a higher likelihood that aggression is dispersed relatively evenly between the females, rather than concentrated on a single individual.

The general consensus with sororities is that there are at least 5-6 individuals.

Failure for a sorority tends to mean serious injury or death, if one does not intervene quickly enough.
 

·
RusselltheShihTzu
Joined
·
20,592 Posts
I am enamoured of my female, Minerva. At the same time I bought Minerva I saw another female and contemplated buying her and having two. But a wise person likened it to having a Queen and a Queen-in-Waiting: One or the other eventually comes to a bad end. So Minerva rules her 20 long kingdom alone without having to constantly guard against the QIW usurping her.

But, like anything in aquatics, there are always exceptions. As long as you have a heavily planted tank, watch them closely and intervene at the very first signs of stress and have a backup plan you can always try. I wish you luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Okay, so I took the advice and made a divider, I originally placed Marinette (black and red) into the smaller side, since she was my second to come, I put her in last night, check on her this morning, I thought the water from the filter was causing her stress and moved it, when I came home just now, she was still stressed, so I added her to the big side and she and My Lady chilled for a few together, getting air and swimming without issue, she got all her colour back, Marinette became feisty again.

Everyone keeps saying the first one acts like the aggressor, but not for me, My Lady is mellow as hell.

I switched My Lady to the smaller side because Marinette wouldn't leave her alone, My Lady is fine, she's happy and content, but Marinette is not, in the big side she lost her colour again, and has stress lines, I re-added My Lady, she would chase My Lady, but she got her colour back.

Marinette wants My Lady there, but at the same time not.
 

·
RusselltheShihTzu
Joined
·
20,592 Posts
You have to give Betta time to adjust; sometimes it takes no time at all and some times it takes a week or more. We should never be in a hurry to see positive results when we get new Betta or make changes. If they were mine I would split them up and leave it be for at least a week.

And do not misread My Lady's mellowness as lack of dominance. It may be different for fish but in most species it's the Omega that has to do all of the fighting/threatening; the Alpha is secure in his or her position and doesn't need the confrontation. I watch it in our horses where Ben lets the other horses eat with him, stand with him, etc., while Red, second in command, is constantly challenged and defending his position. Same in dogs. But, as I said, it might be different in fish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,895 Posts
The trouble with bettas is that they are highly unpredictable. While they may tolerate the presence of another fish one day, this does not mean they will tolerate the presence of the same fish the next.

Simply that your females seem to be cohabitating 'peacefully' for now, doesn't guarantee long-term success.

And when something does go wrong, it goes wrong surprisingly fast. I've had bettas maim and kill other fish in a matter of minutes. When they are determined to inflict serious injury, they are devastatingly quick.

Also, colouring up doesn't necessarily mean your females are happier together. They could simply be colouring up to look as strong and healthy as possible, in a bid to deter the other fish. You don't want to look like a weak target.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,470 Posts
boy you got that right on the girls being unpredictable. The first time adding my girls in a 10 gallon tank they chased so much. I had to separate the aggressor in a smaller tank until the others found their place to own in the tank. Now all is stable with five in the tank. And I have different size bettas in the tank. A lot of the times people say to make sure they are the same age but that is hard to do when one dies suddenly and you need to replace one to keep the group equal and calm.

If you want to have them together, get three more and slowly add all of the girls in. Make sure it's very heavily planted so they can hide from the boss in the tank. It took one of my girls to become the boss after the last boss passed on. The whole territory had to start all over and a new boss had to take over. Otherwise keep them separate. good luck with your pretty girls. <3
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top