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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I apologize if this has been asked before, but I've been interested in improving my betta's diet, and I know that blood worms are a huge favorite supplement for betta diets, and I've fed blood worm "ice cubes" or whatever you want to call them to fish before.

Out of curiosity I was comparing the protein content of the Omega One (having read this is a forum favorite brand, and also not finding NLS anywhere) freeze-dried versus the frozen blood worms. I noticed the freeze-dried have 55% min. crude protein, whereas the actual frozen blood worm cubes were listed as only having about 5.5% crude protein... which doesn't seem to be a misprint.

Does this mean the freeze-dried are better than the more natural frozen ice cube method? Or are they actually less better for a reason I'm not aware of? I was mostly understanding that a high protein diet was good, so that the more crude protein, the better.
 

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To Cey re: bloodworms

Hi Cey:

I suspect that the large difference in reported crude protein has more to do with the process of measurement than anything else (I'm thinking here of the presence of a lot of water in the frozen version of the creature vs. almost none in the freeze-dried; the freeze-dried products' nutrients are therefore more concentrated per a particular unit of weight).

In my experience it doesn't really matter. The frozen product is about as close as you can get to the live version. My bettas have always loved the frozen foods and have thrived on them when I combined them with a more balanced staple formula. I haven't used freeze-dried single food products very often but a lot of the fishkeepers I know swear by them. I think the important thing is your desire to give your fishes variety in their diet, and bloodworms in any form seem to be good for bettas in moderation and as part of a broader diet.

-Yorg

I apologize if this has been asked before, but I've been interested in improving my betta's diet, and I know that blood worms are a huge favorite supplement for betta diets, and I've fed blood worm "ice cubes" or whatever you want to call them to fish before.

Out of curiosity I was comparing the protein content of the Omega One (having read this is a forum favorite brand, and also not finding NLS anywhere) freeze-dried versus the frozen blood worms. I noticed the freeze-dried have 55% min. crude protein, whereas the actual frozen blood worm cubes were listed as only having about 5.5% crude protein... which doesn't seem to be a misprint.

Does this mean the freeze-dried are better than the more natural frozen ice cube method? Or are they actually less better for a reason I'm not aware of? I was mostly understanding that a high protein diet was good, so that the more crude protein, the better.
 

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I have been feeding freeze-dried after they have been soaked and soft, but I haven't fed them for awhile and am not going back to them because they look yucky (for lack of a better word).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the input guys! I am going to try frozen after I get some more money; I bought some Omega freeze-dried bloodworms this morning because the new betta still wasn't taking to the pellets (he was grudgingly, sparingly eating them, so at least I didn't have to worry about him starving, but wanted something better).

Murderface, my older betta, has no problems with the pellets, he crunches them furiously and loudly before consuming them -- I was startled to hear the definitely audible crunching coming from his tank the first time, and looked in to see him looking back at me, crunching away. He hates the freeze dried bloodworms though, won't even touch them.

Of course, as soon as I got home with the freeze-dried bloodworms for the new betta (Aristotle / Angelface), thinking he'd LOVE them since he hated the pellets... he, too, hated the freeze-dried bloodworms, so now I've got a $4 little can of bloodworms that none of my fish want. I guess I'll get rid of it on craigslist. He is, however, eating the pellets, I discovered a while back -- he just weirdly waits until they sink to the bottom, and has been continuing to act like a bottom feeder ever since I brought him home, which I keep telling him, he's very weird.

So, frozen is the next option for both of them, which at least I can also use for my other fish. I'd rather put the frozen cubes in my big 20 gallon tanks than the freeze-dried which are likely to get swept under the current and all over the tank, they are so flimsy.
 

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i would hold on the the freeze dried bloodworms. They are good for soaking in medicine if you needed. I also keep a small container on hand in case I need to soak my fish's food in medicine.

Don't forget that it can take up to 2 weeks for a new betta to get settled and start eating. I've found the best way is to stick to one type of food - like pellets. Feed them one and at a time. If he eats one, then offer another. If he does eat it them remove it and try at the next feeding time. He'll learn that the pellets are food and eventually eat them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes, the new betta has actually started eating regularly now as of a few days ago, so that is no longer a worry! I discovered he was actually sneaking pellets off the bottom behind my back, as opposed to not eating like I originally thought. And I will keep the freeze dried on hand for emergency since I didn't think about the medicine aspect.
 
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