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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm a college student (surprise surprise). I'm not sure what to do with my betta fish over the 19 days that I will be away from my dorm room.

I have read both in these forums and on various other websites that it is safe to leave a betta for two weeks, but I'm not sure if its safe to leave him for that long.

I will be driving home tomorrow (I should have thought about this earlier, I know), and home is about 6 or 7 hours away. I live in Canada, so it is cold outside right now, so I understand the temperature concerns and am able to deal with the temperature if I do choose to bring him home with me. I will be a passenger in the vehicle, if that helps.

Based on the amount of time I have between now and tomorrow morning, should I try to bring him home with me?
 

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I think the number one question here would be how big your tank is. I have three bettas, all in 2.5 gallon tanks, and I am taking them home with me for a similar amount of time, because (well, a lot of reasons, one of my boys tailbites, the other has separation anxiety, but the pertinent reason here) I don't feel comfortable leaving them in 2.5 gallon tanks without them getting ammonia poisoning, or having all the water evaporate out on me.

I would also say that 19 days seems like a bit of a long stretch to leave your fish alone, regardless of tank size. A lot can happen in just a weekend gone... and a LOT could happen in 19 days gone.

Just my opinions really (also a college student here, in Michigan, so also dealing with the cold too, haha). I would vote yay to bringing him home with you though.
 

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I have just one betta in a 2.5 gallon tank with a filter and a heater. I think I will try to take him home. It's just a matter of what to put him in, I guess. I have a couple of different sizes of plastic containers that I could put him in. I'm just worried about them coming open.
 

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Completely for future reference: I don't know how close a Petsmart is to you (or if you have Petsmart?), but their betta cups have nice tight lids that make a very satisfying locking noise when you put them on, and air holes around the center that are small and numerous, but not remotely conducive to sloshing out water if you don't fill them over 2/3rds of the way. I went to my Petsmart and offered to buy them off of them, and they just gave them to me for free. After having to bring home one of the snails in them, I decided I would try them for fish transport (I did disinfect them myself regardless). Just a future note.

If you're a passenger in the vehicle, and can keep him in your lap (maybe in a small box with the container in it, with a bit of padding for warmth around the container and so it doesn't move around a lot), you could very easily keep an eye on him and make sure it doesn't come off.

Heck, the LPS told me I could take my fish home in Tupperware if I wanted to... I decided I wasn't entirely comfortable with that and wanted air holes for them of course, thus the Petsmart cups.

Anyways, I ramble sometimes. Let us know how it goes and if you two make it safely, and pleasant driving and travels to you and yours!
 

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Fish are shipped (and spend days) in plastic fish-bags. You can use Zip-lock bags (doubled up), wrapped in towels for insulation. Just leave 1/3 air, and don't breath into the bag. Some members here have used thermos bottles successfully. Don't worry about lack of air for such a short time. They'll have plenty.
 

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Yes fish can go months (yes plural) without food so 19 days isn't all that big of a deal. Besides, there are things in the tank for the fish to snack on here and there. One solution to an extended leave is to add ghost shrimp to the tank - living snacks. It's always best to add them a couple days before you leave because there is a probability to lose a few right from the start. If you have snails in the tank then it's not that big of a deal since they will take care of anything that the betta doesn't.

Most dorms shut down power for the month, so many people MUST take their fish with them. It's really easy to take small tanks - you'll want to bag your filter media in water so it doesn't dry out, and it's good to leave enough water in the tank to cover the substrate, preserving the bacteria living there as well.

The main concern when transporting fish in the winter (or any time really) is temperature control, especially for a longer haul like that. Thermos is a great idea for that, plus you won't have to worry about it breaking (petsmart cups break easily) or spilling. Set it in a cup holder and you are hands free, worry free for the ride home.

Just be sure to acclimate the fish to the new water when you set the tank back up.
 
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