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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everyone, long time no posty here (which is good, because hey, diseases suck!)

I picked up a new betta boy today from Petco. He looked fine in the store, but now that I've got him home and under a light, it appears like he has some kind of grayish/whitish film all over him. He has what looks like almost a patch right on top of his nose, and it seems almost like it's sliming on his body. It's hard to describe..Almost like it's a film that's coming off, maybe? Some of it looks like dust speckles (but not gold like with velvet, this is definitely grayish white).

Anyway, I'm not sure if it's bacterial or fungal or what it is. I tried to get pictures, but I was only using my phone so I'm sorry it's kinda crappy quality. I know that Columnaris can be a patch on the face so I'm sorta freaked out a little. Wanted a better opinion than what I can figure out myself.

Water params:

5.5g tank, w/sponge filter & heater
Ph: 7.4
Ammonia: 0
Nitrite: 0
Nitrate: 0
Temp: 78F

There are plants in this tank, so I am hesitant to use salt at the moment. But have been thinking about it.

Any help would be super appreciated!
 

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To me that looks like slime disease. Check this article here written by Neale Monks, Ph.D. (zoologist and marine biologist) to see if this is what you're dealing with. Edit: Helps if I add the link, derp; http://www.fishchannel.com/fish-health/freshwater-conditions/slime-disease.aspx

The only thing in that article that I do not agree with is raising the water temperature. Since this disease has a high risk of secondary infections, raising the water temperature will increase how quickly the bad bacteria grow.

If you think it's slime disease, try aquarium salt first. If that doesn't work then I would recommend potassium permanganate baths. (Be careful with this stuff and thoroughly research what can and cannot be mixed with it. Do not put it inside of your tank).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
To me that looks like slime disease. Check this article here written by Neale Monks, Ph.D. (zoologist and marine biologist) to see if this is what you're dealing with. Edit: Helps if I add the link, derp; http://www.fishchannel.com/fish-health/freshwater-conditions/slime-disease.aspx

The only thing in that article that I do not agree with is raising the water temperature. Since this disease has a high risk of secondary infections, raising the water temperature will increase how quickly the bad bacteria grow.

If you think it's slime disease, try aquarium salt first. If that doesn't work then I would recommend potassium permanganate baths. (Be careful with this stuff and thoroughly research what can and cannot be mixed with it. Do not put it inside of your tank).
I read the article. It looks as though the salt should be added to the aquarium. I've read that proper dosage is 1 tablespoon per five gallons? I have java ferns, amazon swords, and an anubias in the tank. Can I add the salt? I've read conflicting things about treating with salt in a planted aquarium. =\
 

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I read the article. It looks as though the salt should be added to the aquarium. I've read that proper dosage is 1 tablespoon per five gallons? I have java ferns, amazon swords, and an anubias in the tank. Can I add the salt? I've read conflicting things about treating with salt in a planted aquarium. =\
I'm honestly not sure about salt with java ferns or anubias. My amazon sword I used Alum and not aq salt to kill snails, so I cannot say for sure.

I would post in the plant section of the forum and inquire about aq salt with those specific plants.

If you get the go-ahead, the above article gives a dosage recipe (keeping in mind about the temperature and secondary bacterial infections. The choice is of course yours.);

The parasites that cause slime disease in aquarium fish are sensitive to salt, and slime disease can usually be treated through a combination of raising water temperature to 86 degrees Fahrenheit (30 degrees Celsius), the addition of salt at a dose of 0.4 to 0.7 ounce per gallon (3 to 5 grams per liter), and improving environmental conditions. Warm, saline conditions should be maintained for 7 to 14 days.
I do not recommend adding the salt directly to the tank without first being dissolved in liquid first. I would first mix the salt in a separate container of dechlorinated hot water, and then slowly over the period of an entire day add small amounts to the tank until proper dosage is acquired.

When you do a water change, remember to only add enough salt to the amount of water going back into the tank. So the first time you dose for the entire tank. When you do a water change of, lets say 5 gallons, then you treat 5 gallons and not the entire tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Okay, so bad news guys. Chili is not getting better. In fact, he is getting worse. I came in to him today laying on the bottom of the tank with fins clamped and labored breathing. He was curved in a U shape. When he swims, he spirals in a circle, kind of like how a football spins when it is thrown. He will not eat or swim. It looks almost as if he swam through a bunch of dust and the dust got wet and stuck to him. Or like cob webs?

I don't know what to do for him at this point. The film or whatever is on him is not going away, I am starting to wonder if it's a fungus? Or a bacteria? I have been doing salt treatments for him, as recommended previously, but that isn't really doing anything at all for him.

At this point, I fear he may be on his way out, but I want to give it one last try before I give up and let him go. :( And I of course don't want him to suffer. I took a couple new pictures.

Any help or advice would be appreciated.
 

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