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How does everyone heat their bettas once they have been jarred? I've heard of several methods including using a space heater for a small room, a barracks system in a large heated tank, and using heat tape on shelves to heat up the jars. Why do you use a certain method and why? Which is the most affordable and easiest to maintain?
 

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I'm not there yet, but my plan is to use heat tape for jars. Benefits: No shared water. Easy to move individuals around without affecting other fish, easy to card and practice flaring. Does not have to heat a whole room. Drawback: Time consuming to change the water.
 

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I have been wondering this myself as I keep wild bettas, but want to separate out some of my non-breeding sub-adults and adults into smaller containers without the need for individual heaters.

I have done the Bain-marie style method that Matt uses, but it isn't very aesthetically pleasing to look at. I just fill up a large tank with water and then put the jars or smaller tanks into that.

However, heat tape is the one I am really interested in. However, I am worried about the danger of it catching fire? Is this a risk at all?
 

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I have been wondering this myself as I keep wild bettas, but want to separate out some of my non-breeding sub-adults and adults into smaller containers without the need for individual heaters.

I have done the Bain-marie style method that Matt uses, but it isn't very aesthetically pleasing to look at. I just fill up a large tank with water and then put the jars or smaller tanks into that.

However, heat tape is the one I am really interested in. However, I am worried about the danger of it catching fire? Is this a risk at all?
Apparently there's a way of attaching a thermostat that shuts it off if the temp gets too warm, but I don't know how it works. The risk of fire should be minimal, since it's so commonly used...but I haven't done enough research to tell you for sure.
 

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I think the easiest, most economical, way to heat multiple tanks is to heat the room/ space where the tanks are. My boys (all 15) are housed in individual 2.5 gallon tanks. I use a small personal space heater to heat the nook where I keep the males. Costs less than $20 & draws only 200 watts.
 

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Yes but that has a high risk of a fire
I've used the method for decades both for fish and snakes in my home and in stand-alone buildings without any incidents. I would also point out that with bettas the temperature outside the aquarium is critical for fry as well as for adults. An in tank or under tank heater will not heat the outside air.

If your collection is to be left unattended for long period of times, I would recommend you only use a heater that has an automatic shutoff if tipped over and a thermostat.
 

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A space heater is also just impossible for some people to have- for example, living with my parents and having all my fish in my bedroom there's just no way to heat the entire room and have both me and the fish be comfortable. Lots of people just don't have the luxury of having the room to use a space heater.

Temperature (and humidity) outside the tank is really only important for fry and sick fish, adults can handle cooler air. Besides, the issue of warm air can be solved easily with a lid or cling wrap. The heated water evaporates, and makes the air warm and humid. I've never experienced an issue with it.

I also have to mention that I've seen multiple space heaters fail and essentially overheat every fish in the room to the point of death.
 
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