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So I have a 29 gallon tank (fresh water) and iv been cycling it for about a week. After the first day of setting it up it got cloudy the day after for about three days and than it cleared up. I was told to do a 1/3 of a water change. After I did the water change the tank got cloudy again. Is this normal? I'm also suppose to be adding another dose of the bacteria(stress zyme) in the tank but idk if I should be if the tank is cloudy at the moment.
I forgot to mention that I have 10 leopard danino in the tank.
Also, on the stress zyme bottle it says to double the dose for new tank nd for the following two weeks. Does this mean I double the everytime I add it to the tank for two weeks?
Lol I'm new to the fish world. Any pointers would be much appreciated.
 

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There will be enough ammonia & nitrite to get the cycling process going even with the large daily water changes. Doing a 50% daily water change will cut the ammonia level in half, you do want to keep it below 0.25ppm. This is where having your own water test kit is a big thing, daily tests will determine the amount of water to change, as well as monitor how cycling is progressing.

Cloudiness is normal with cycling, it's basically free floating bacteria that eventually will be growing in the bio media of your filter. Often it can be cloudy for quite a while in these situations, then bam, clear up overnight.

If there's any chance of getting mature media from a cycled & running tank to add to your filtration by all means do so, this will cut back the cycling time. You didn't mention what you're using to treat the replacement water for disinfectants that are found in municipally supplied tap water, this is a big thing, especially with a cycling tank. Seachem Prime is the go to water treatment for this, especially with a cycling tank where fish are concerned. It'll lock up ammonia into a state that's non-toxic for fish, but can still be used by your nitrifying bacteria. It will also do the same for nitrite when your cycle gets to that point.
 

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I'm also a big fan of frequent large % water changes, during cycling.

Keeps any fish and/or plants safe, and toxins down, while the good stuff is beginning to grow.
 

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I saw your post on cycling. What % of water do you change? Should I vacuum the substrate while cycling or leave it alone? How do you know when your tank has completely cycled?
 

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You are using the right kind of fish.. Danio's are very resistant to Hyperplasia and nitrite poisoning. You do not need to do huge water changes! I would feed sparingly once a day. Like a couple flakes per fish. Monitor the water quality for large spikes, and if you get one, then do a water change. I would not rely on enzymes as a quick solution to cycling. They often will give you a weak cycle that crashes easily. The cloudiness can be several things. Either free floating bacteria, or even algae. Often if you see cloudiness after a water change, it can free floating algae blooms caused by high nutrient levels in tap water. It could also mean you are disturbing the substrate or filters too much. An easy test is to take a clear quart container and fill it with tank water. Put it up against a white background and see what color it is. White equals bacteria, green or yellow tinge and it's algae. Either way do not do anything about either. Neither is a danger to the fish. You cannot see Ammonia or Nitrite. Just be patient and continue on that path until you see nitrates, then you can add or change out your fish.
 
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