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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently (Sunday evening) moved my half-moon boy, Charlemagne, into a 5gal setup (he has a 3gal which I left in my hometown 5hrs away from my college town). When I added him into the setup, I realized that the upper half of his tail is deteriorating D: It hasn't gotten very far, but I'm still worried. I know it's from the conditions in my 3gal at home (he's got a lot of live plants in there, including duckweed, which from time to time smothers the surface + quite a few ramshorns), likely high ammonia levels, but I want to make sure that doesn't happen in his new tank (and I want him to get better and grow that beautiful tail back!).

So here's what I did today- took a sample fo his "new" water from the 5gal into Petco, they tested it for me and bam- high ammonia levels. I've been treating my water with Tetra AquaSafe conditioner, though apparently that does nothing for ammonia levels. I bought a bottle of Tetra AmmoniaSafe today as well as some Biozyme (living bacteria- though I've heard this may or may not work). My filter DOES have bacteria in it, though the sand I've added is brand new, so I don't think I have enough bacteria established yet.

My question is- do I use AmmoniaSafe instead of the AquaSafe condtioner, or alongside it? I'm also thinking of gettign a moss ball, after reading on the forums that they help to reduce ammonia. I transplanted a few of my live plants from my 3gal, but the tank is still awfully "empty" for now.

I'll update with a picture or two in a minute, any advice is appreciated, thank you!
 

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For now, I would just do a lot of water changes, that would get rid of the ammonia faster than a moss ball. But moss balls and certain plants will be good for reducing ammonia in the long run once your betta heals.
 

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Prime is a very good water conditioner. It removes chlorine, and detoxifies ammonia and nitrite.

However, I am curious to know how often you do water changes. It is very important to keep up your water changes, especially in smaller, uncycled tanks. I am assuming your 3 gallon does not have a filter. Correct?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Prime is a very good water conditioner. It removes chlorine, and detoxifies ammonia and nitrite.

However, I am curious to know how often you do water changes. It is very important to keep up your water changes, especially in smaller, uncycled tanks. I am assuming your 3 gallon does not have a filter. Correct?
My 3gal has a whisper filter with bacteria in it (my friend gave me a piece of her cycled 75gal's sponge to use, as well as live sand), though lately I admit overfeeding has become a problem, coupled with the duckweed covering the surface I think kept ammonia from evaporating. I did water changes around every week or two, about 50-75%, though I definitely plan on doing them at least once a week with this tank- what would you reccommend? (And my friend did reccomend Prime to me after I bought this AmmoniaSafe. I plan on getting some when I can make it back out to Petco again).
 

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While a small amount of ammonia might evaporate, it is not going to be enough to keep it under control. I think you will just need to do more frequent water changes. I am not sure how much or how often, but some other members should.

Also, if your tank was cycled the ammonia and nitrite would always be at 0. I've read that tanks under 5 gallons cannot be cycled. The small tanks don't hold a stable cycle. >> At least this is what I have read, someone else may have more advice on this!

If you can get one, a liquid test kit would help you. Test strips are not very good, and you usually only get a few per pack. Being able to monitor your water on a regular basis in your own home is a great thing! The API Freshwater Test Kit is well worth the money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
While a small amount of ammonia might evaporate, it is not going to be enough to keep it under control. I think you will just need to do more frequent water changes. I am not sure how much or how often, but some other members should.

Also, if your tank was cycled the ammonia and nitrite would always be at 0. I've read that tanks under 5 gallons cannot be cycled. The small tanks don't hold a stable cycle. >> At least this is what I have read, someone else may have more advice on this!

If you can get one, a liquid test kit would help you. Test strips are not very good, and you usually only get a few per pack. Being able to monitor your water on a regular basis in your own home is a great thing! The API Freshwater Test Kit is well worth the money.
I think I just read that recently on the site too, about smaller tanks not being cycled :/ So much for that. Thank you for your help, though! I will look into the test kit, I have heard that the strips aren't the best. I just grabbed a couple for free from the store today hoping for a quick fix :/
 
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