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Discussion Starter #1
I just have a quick question. My curiousity has gotten the better of me and I can't find the answer anywhere on the internet. I am just curious as to how bettas choose mates. I read somewhere that they choose mates by finding a partner that looks similar to themselves. Is this true? I have a male in a divided 20 gallon right now with a female on either side. The male is white as is his sister and the other female is a lavender butterfly. Now the male is showing interest in the butterfly and not his sister. So I am just wondering if anyone has heard this theory about like choosing like or is this just bogus?
 

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Eh no thats not true.

Basically in the wild they spawn whenever they come across each other. So a female will come across a male and his nest and then they will spawn.

In captivity the breeder selects, conditions, and introduces the pair and then waits for them to spawn.

The fighting that goes on during the courtship is to show that they are strong, dominant fish.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you... good to know. This community is so knowledgable. It's nice to know I can find the right answers here.
 

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I would assume that in the wild the female would choose the male that looks the strongest as that would ensure the strongest fry and more likely survival.

Jeff. :)
 

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Wild females drift around from male to male and scope out the "best" bubblenest. Not necessarily the biggest, but I assume whatever appeals to them. (That's why you get females that will look at the nest, and sometimes try to rip it to shreds. That's her way of saying "meh, not good enough.") Once she decides the nest is suitable to hold the fry, they spawn, and she moves on. It's been noted that in the wild, females usually stay in the same vicinity after spawning for a while. Some researchers think it's because if something were to happen to the male, she takes on role of "dad." Could be true, could be myth, but it sure is interesting either way.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That is really interesting. I hope the scientific community does more research and finds out. Bettas have an interesting way of taking care of their young. I guess it would make sense if the female waited around until the babies hatched. Why go to all that trouble to find a mate if the babies die because the male can't look after them.
 
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