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Discussion Starter #1
I tried for twenty minutes to get it to stay in the sand but the second I let go it floats up. I read online it (hornwort) can be planted in the substrate is that not true? Also what am I supposed to do with those pieces that appear to have "pine needles" growing from both ends? How do I plant that?




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Hornwort is a bunch plant. Mainly used a a floating surface plant. It can be planted in the substrate as a bunch. Banded together and weighted with plant weights it can be planted and the weights will hold it in place in the substrate. With what you have I would band it together put plant weights on the end and leave it unplanned until there are some roots and then place it in the substrate past the weights.
 

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Yes, just let it float in the tank. Betta love the surface cover. They swim through it, exploring, and sleep in it like abed in the clouds. 🙂

If you want it planted, you can weight the base. It will then grow up to the surface and the spread out as a surface plant.
 
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Hornwort doesn't have roots. I read somewhere that most who have trouble with it shedding and/or dying have it "planted." So it rots.
Just another reason I dislike this plant. It may be good for a floater for top cover because it will make your betta feel more secure. It's also a good floating hide for Fry.

But as a planted, plant it really does not do well.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hornwort is a bunch plant. Mainly used a a floating surface plant. It can be planted in the substrate as a bunch. Banded together and weighted with plant weights it can be planted and the weights will hold it in place in the substrate. With what you have I would band it together put plant weights on the end and leave it unplanned until there are some roots and then place it in the substrate past the weights.


Well I'm a big old dummy! It came with a plant weight on it and I took it off and threw it away because I didn't realize it was a weight. Gah I wish I could go back and stop myself lol


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Hornwort doesn't have roots. I read somewhere that most who have trouble with it shedding and/or dying have it "planted." So it rots.


Interesting. I really don't want it as a floater cause I already have floaters and it's blocking too much light...


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Yes, just let it float in the tank. Betta love the surface cover. They swim through it, exploring, and sleep in it like abed in the clouds. 🙂

If you want it planted, you can weight the base. It will then grow up to the surface and the spread out as a surface plant.


I already have floaters but yes my betta is quite excited about the surface cover. I was floating some fat wisteria which extended half way down the tank and my betta was PUMPED

I would like to plant the hornwort though to give room to my real floaters. The hornwort came weighted and I didn't know it was a weight and threw it away. Do you think I can just put a rock on top of it to hold it down? Or should I let it float until it gets roots?


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Either way Hornwort really does not last as a planted plant. and in order to get a good enough root system you need to float it. How about a Jar with treated water and flourish in it on the window sill. ( just a thought instead of wasting the plant.)
 

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Either way Hornwort really does not last as a planted plant. and in order to get a good enough root system you need to float it. How about a Jar with treated water and flourish in it on the window sill. ( just a thought instead of wasting the plant.)


That's disappointing. I can leave it floating for a couple days in my tank if nothing miraculous has happened by then I'll probably just give it to my mom for her pond


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Hornwort does NOT develop true roots. If planted in the substrate it will rot and leaves will drop off. If weighted down with a rock the ends will be crushed and it will rot and the leaves drop off.

"When planting hornwort, keep in mind that this is naturally more of a floating plant. Although it can be planted in the substrate it might start losing its bottom leaves after a while, which doesn't look too great. You can prevent this by just letting it float free or by cutting off and replanting the full tops once the bottom of the stems start looking too bare."
....Internet Source​

What you have Ceratophyllum demersum (Common Hornwort, Coon Tail, Coon's Tail, Rigid Hornwort). It is the kind most often sold in pet stores and online.

Below are two photos of Ceratophyllum submersum (Soft Hornwort). This is the kind I have/had and have only found true Ceratophyllum submersum online from exactly one source. I weight it down and let it flow over the surface. Doing so I have never had either variety lose leaves after acclimating. Just to show you how well Hornwort grows, the first photo is the Ceratophyllum submersum the day it was added (back right corner). Second photo is 10 days later...no ferts, either. ;-)

As with any stem plant, Hornwort can be kept trimmed so that it does not flow over the surface.
 

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Oops, almost forgot. Hornwort is considered invasive in most states. Check the laws because it may be illegal to release in natural ponds; even on private property. Not sure if it applies to ornamental Goldfish ponds.
 

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I already have floaters but yes my betta is quite excited about the surface cover. I was floating some fat wisteria which extended half way down the tank and my betta was PUMPED

I would like to plant the hornwort though to give room to my real floaters. The hornwort came weighted and I didn't know it was a weight and threw it away. Do you think I can just put a rock on top of it to hold it down? Or should I let it float until it gets roots?


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There are two types of hornwort, demersum and submersum. I have tried both, at Russell's suggestion, within the last couple of months.

I am afraid you would have to check with an online plant index (or Russell) to clarify which plant is which, but one is tough and beautiful in my tank, growing fast. The other was a total waste of space, shed needles everywhere on arrival, was half the size, and I chucked it within a week when I got tired of cleaning up after it.

Neither of them grow any roots.

The good grower has gone from 5 x 6 inch strands floating in my 12 inch cube betta tank, to covering the surface with a beautiful lace effect within 3 weeks. The strands are 3 x the length they were, non shedding, gently filtering but not blocking the light. Exquisite plant. Valentine loves all floating plants, but he is making particularly good use of this one as a couch, dining table and maze.

When I do a water change later today, I will be cutting it back by 2 thirds. One third will be chucked. one third will stay in the tank, and the last third will transfer into my 57litre, where it will make much less mess than the disintegrating Hornwort that was there until yesterday.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hornwort does NOT develop true roots. If planted in the substrate it will rot and leaves will drop off. If weighted down with a rock the ends will be crushed and it will rot and the leaves drop off.

"When planting hornwort, keep in mind that this is naturally more of a floating plant. Although it can be planted in the substrate it might start losing its bottom leaves after a while, which doesn't look too great. You can prevent this by just letting it float free or by cutting off and replanting the full tops once the bottom of the stems start looking too bare."
....Internet Source​

What you have Ceratophyllum demersum (Common Hornwort, Coon Tail, Coon's Tail, Rigid Hornwort). It is the kind most often sold in pet stores and online.

Below are two photos of Ceratophyllum submersum (Soft Hornwort). This is the kind I have/had and have only found true Ceratophyllum submersum online from exactly one source. I weight it down and let it flow over the surface. Doing so I have never had either variety lose leaves after acclimating. Just to show you how well Hornwort grows, the first photo is the Ceratophyllum submersum the day it was added (back right corner). Second photo is 10 days later...no ferts, either. ;-)

As with any stem plant, Hornwort can be kept trimmed so that it does not flow over the surface.


I just checked with the seller I bought it from it's Ceratophyllum demersum. Does that change anything? A few hours ago though I just got sick of it floating and decided I was going to group it into 2 and Jam it into the substrate and if it dies it dies. While floating (I've had it since Friday) it looked exactly like the pic I posted asking how to plant it even in water. It was very tightly closed. I wish I had a before pic of it in water. Within an hour of planting it it opened up beautifully. The whole reason I bought it is cause I thought it looked like little baby pine trees and how all opened up it looks a little less like pine trees but I still think it's beautiful. Idk if it's temporary but it seems quite happy now.




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