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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I have been thinking about my precious little female betta, and wondering what the risks of her becoming egg bound are...

Does anyone have any knowledge on this subject? What factors can raise the risk of a female becoming egg bound? How can you tell if she is egg bound, and not just bloated? What can you do to save her in the event she does become egg bound?

Any info on this subject would be much appreciated!
 

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Sexually mature female bettas always carry eggs, whether they look fat/"egg bound" or thin. So there is actually no such thing as "egg bound".

Don't worry about "egg bound" females. They will either absorb or release eggs if they need to. If you think your female betta is getting too fat, simply reduce her ration per feeding. Problems occur not because of unreleased eggs, but by over feeding.
 

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I had one, Minerva, who could or would not release her eggs even after being exposed to a male. She wasn't fat and didn't pine cone. She was not constipated. She had previously either expelled or absorbed her eggs.

When I was trying to figure out what to do I read that being "egg bound" is not the problem so much as the infection that can be set up if a female does not release her eggs. Unfortunately, I read this after the fact.

Minerva was a lone female in a community tank. Could this have made a difference?

Thanks.
 

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Most of my females remain in sororities and never get to breed. They get quite fat, abour 10-15mm thick (viewed from above). But they live longer lives than those I do breed.

I only move females to solitary if I consider them breed worthy. Often half of them are never bred. These too live longer than those i do breed.

Since I want my females to always be ready to breed, I tend to over feed them. Many of them eventually have bloat issues. IMO, it's not because of unreleased eggs. If I reduce their feeding, they remain healthy.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Speaking of non breeding females living longer lives, this brings up another question I have had for a while, but I have not been able to find an answer through research...

On average, do the males live longer than females?
 

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Never really paid much attention. I don't think there is a definite answer for that. It alk depends on husbandry.

But if there is such a time line, I'd say non breeding females should live longer than non breeding males especially when they move less (older bettas move less) - often prone to diseases. females are more tolerant to less movement. But it isn't always as such.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Never really paid much attention. I don't think there is a definite answer for that. It alk depends on husbandry.

But if there is such a time line, I'd say non breeding females should live longer than non breeding males especially when they move less (older bettas move less) - often prone to diseases. females are more tolerant to less movement. But it isn't always as such.
Thanks @indjo , that's interesting. I wonder why the females are less likely to get sick when less active.

Another thing I was wondering about, but couldn't find the answer to, is are males and females the same size? Or is there a difference.

Sorry for asking question after question....I just keep thinking of things I was wondering about but couldn't find through Google.
 

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That's what this forum is for - discussion. You don't have to agree with me. Experiences may differ depending on climate, water sources, etc. So if you experienced or read something different, feel free to question my opinion. Even I could learn something new from comparing experiences.

Maybe it's not the movement. Maybe it's more about the fish's mental state . . . Just guessing. I mean, this is a very territorial species. MAYBE when they get older and feel weaker, they somehow stress, specially those flared regularly. I've never discussed/compare this topic.

Usually the males are slightly bigger (body - no fins). . . . If both kept similarly (same water volume, same amount of feeding, never bred, etc. Males reduce a great deal of eating during breeding. So if young males are bred, they could become smaller than females).

There're several factors that influence growth. Intimidated males (when still in sorority) may grow less. Males kept in solitary may grow slower than females in big tanks.

Nowadays I see different sizes (genetically). Especially mine - I mix bred regular size to giants. Plus I bought fish that were apparently smaller than usual. So now my collection can range between 3-5cm BO (I don't breed to make them bigger or smaller. I breed for color and form) - due to genetic. I can no longer determine which sex tend to grow bigger.
 

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According to IBC (International Betta Congress) judges' guidelines, males should be at least 1.5" and females 1.25" body-only. All things being equal (finnage, proportion, etc.), the judge should choose the largest Betta.

Giant HMPK: Males 2.5" minimum and females 2" body-only minimum. I couldn't find anything on Giant HM?

And just because. :) EE/Dumbo pectorals should be half the length of their body. Betta with smaller than EE/Dumbo but larger than normal Betta are termed "Big Ears."
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
I know this is months later, but I just came back to this thread to re-read and saw your last posts. Thank you for this info, @RussellTheShihTzu and @indjo! 🙂
 
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