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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I'm literally new to the whole wild betta topic, I've taken care of our , well knowed common betta but i decided to try something different. For example mouthbrooders, i know that B. channuides and B. rubra are the good starter fish, but since I've had more experience with other fish, i thought i should go with something harder maybe... soo i chosed B. hendra. I've looked online and gathered some info from seriously fish and so on, but i don't want to get a fish that i don't have the experience to keep. So my question would be, is B. hendra a good species for a medial exp fish keeper ?

Also does anyone here has an extra pair they would be willing to sell ?

Thanks for the respond and feel free to post tips and techniques for keeping this fish
 

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they all are the same, B. Hendra under the coccina group need lower pH water for breeding.. and of cuz luck and other food. I am never good with coccina group.. they don't breed under my care.. but they are nice.. it is a pair that I will purchase once my new place is ready
 

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I must have missed this post somehow.

Anyway, I exclusively keep and breed fish from the coccina complex, Betta hendra among them.

The main difficulty with the coccina complex, is that even captive bred fish do best at a low pH/soft water. A pH of 6.5 is about as high as I would go with these fish (I personally don't like to see these fish being kept in higher pH set-ups especially wild-caught stock). So if you can find a suitable water source (whether your tap water or something like RO water) this will make keeping these fish much less of a challenge.

Personally, I've not found any of the betta species especially difficult to keep (successfully spawning them can be another matter) as long as water conditions are to their liking. They are certainly not a fish I would buy on impulse, but if you've done your research, have prior experience with fish keeping, and not only understand, but are willing to meet, their needs, keeping even the most 'difficult' species shouldn't be an issue.

http://www.bettafish.com/144-journals/170730-wild-betta-journal.html

If you want more info on how to care for and keep these fish, here's my journal. It's a lengthy read but it may prevent you from making some of the same mistakes I did when I first got into keeping wilds.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you both for replying.

I would love to look through your journal and learn everything that this species needs.
Would it be better in a smaller tank or bigger, i was thinking keeping one pair in a 10gl tank and IF they breed move them into my empty 45 gl planted tank.
 

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I keep my pairs in tanks between 5-10 gallons. Unless you were housing a large group of these fish, a 45 gallon certainly isn't necessary. They are a fairly sedentary fish, and seem to prefer to carve out small territories, rather than be constantly on the move.

You don't need to remove them from the tank when they spawn. Fish from this complex shouldn't eat their eggs or their fry. Any fish that does so in my fish room is either sold on or not used for spawning as it's not a trait I want carried onto future generations.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Oh ok, yeah i meant moving the fry once they are adult just in case they get crowded in the 10gl
 
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