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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I was going to start getting into breeding and everything is just falling apart, I was trying to culture micro worms but got Fungus all over it, I think my infusoria failed, and I checked my Betta breeding pair and the male had all of this fluffy cotton like fungus all over him, I rushed to the pet store to get medicine, but he died the following night. My Female has some small spots of cotton on her head, I know it's probably Fungus, I have treated the water with Blue Planet Fungus cure and I am tempted to add some API Fungus remedy as well but I'm afraid the two will clash. I have aquasonic banctonex but haven't used it yet. I have only used the Blue planet fungus cure for her.

She seems fine, shes very active and hyper. When I got her she was in one of those, "sorority" tanks and she is an elephant ear and her fins are quite torn, her tail seems to be healing back though with the see through tissue I'm seeing. Any idea what else I can do? I'm following advice from this guy "Dexter" on youtube who breeds Betta fish, I have moved her to a larger jar, 1.3 liters and I am doing regular water changes. I have also ordered some Indian Almond leaves because I think thats a factor to why my male died and my Females sick. I think those fish are very weak, especially those males, poor things were so tired they couldn't flare anymore in the shop. He was truly a Jewel and I don't want to lose this Female.

I can't send pictures because they won't help, you would never see it on her, the camera won't pick it up.

Please give me some advice, I am trying everything I can to stop that damned fungus growing on her.

Thanks.
 

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Housing:
How many gallons is your tank? 1.3 liters
Does it have a filter? N
Does it have a heater? N
What temperature is your tank? 26 C
Does your tank have an air stone or other type of aeration? N
Does your Betta have tank mates? What kind? N

Food:
What food brand do you use? Blood worms
Do you feed flakes or pellets?N
Freeze-dried?N
How often do you feed your Betta? How much? 2 times a day, about 2 to 4.

Maintenance:
Before your Betta became ill how often did you perform a water change? Every 3 - 4 days.
What percentage of water did you change? 50%
What is the source of your water? Tap, and sometimes tank water.
Do you vacuum the substrate or just dip out water? Dip
What additives do you use? What brand of conditioner? Prime

Water Parameters:
What are your water parameters? Please give exact numbers. If tested by pet store please get exact numbers. "Fine" or "Safe" won't help us help you. Important: Test your water *before* the regular water change; not after one.

Ammonia: 0
Nitrite: 0
Nitrate: 0
pH: 7.6
Hardness (GH):
Alkalinity (KH):

Symptoms and Treatment:
When did you first notice the symptoms? Two days ago
How has your Betta’s appearance changed? Small cotton like fur on top of head.
How has your Betta’s behavior changed? No
Is your Betta still eating? Yes
Have you started treating your Betta? If so, how? Yes, Blue planet fungus cure
Does your Betta have any history of being ill? Idk
How long have you owned your Betta? Few days.
Was he or she ill or suffering some sort of damage when purchased? Yes, torn fins from other females.
 

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Are you able to get photos of your female? It could be columnaris, which is often mistaken for fungal infection. This can be highly contagious with a high mortality rate if untreated, and is capable of killing fish within hours of visible infection.

If it's columnaris, this is usually brought on by stress and or environmental factors such as poor water quality or temperature fluctuations.

How long have you owned the fish? Fish that come from fish or pet stores are rarely in breeding condition. If you were intending on breeding them, they would need to be conditioned first so that they are able to deal with the rigours of courtship and spawning.

What size tank were the female and male living in before the male died and the female was moved to the 1.3L jar? A jar this size would require daily water changes to maintain acceptable water quality. Temperature fluctuations are also a concern in such a small volume of water, if it's not being heated.

I would advise against mixing medications. Some medications may react adversely with others, and some medications are particularly harsh on fish and should only be used once a definite diagnosis has been reached.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Are you able to get photos of your female? It could be columnaris, which is often mistaken for fungal infection. This can be highly contagious with a high mortality rate if untreated, and is capable of killing fish within hours of visible infection.

If it's columnaris, this is usually brought on by stress and or environmental factors such as poor water quality or temperature fluctuations.

How long have you owned the fish? Fish that come from fish or pet stores are rarely in breeding condition. If you were intending on breeding them, they would need to be conditioned first so that they are able to deal with the rigours of courtship and spawning.

What size tank were the female and male living in before the male died and the female was moved to the 1.3L jar? A jar this size would require daily water changes to maintain acceptable water quality. Temperature fluctuations are also a concern in such a small volume of water, if it's not being heated.

I would advise against mixing medications. Some medications may react adversely with others, and some medications are particularly harsh on fish and should only be used once a definite diagnosis has been reached.
The male came from a very small little cup like display, the female was in at least 10 liters maybe a bit less of water with quite a few other females. The male was very tired and didn't move much, the female is very active and moves alot when I get close. I can't get a stable picture of her. I have owned her for about 6 days now, I will start doing daily water changes, but I'm afraid I'll stress her to death, will it be ok? Also I heard you can condition them by feeding blood worms according to my research which I have been doing twice a day.

She's in my room at the moment which is keeping the water at 26C, I think it may have be columnaris, it's only two spots though, and she isn't losing color so far, how do I treat it, with antibacterial stuff from API and other brands? The male had all of this cotton wool looking stuff on his tail, not sure about the mouth.

Thanks.

EDIT: Also could you check out that guy Dexter? I'm planning on keep my Bettas in jars like he does with some almond leaf each, would it be ok?
 

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So which fish did you get first, the male or the female? If you didn't quarantine the newest arrival, there's always the risk that they will spread disease to your existing stock.

Personally, I do not like to see adult bettas kept in jars long-term. Jars are fine for growing out juveniles and sub-adults, but I don't think they offer adequate space for a fish to live out its whole life in. The reason breeders use jars, is because it's more economical. This doesn't necessarily mean it's in the best interest of the fish.

Furthermore, smaller volumes of water demand a higher level of maintenance. You cannot be remiss with water changes, as your fish will very quickly start to show the affects of ammonia poisoning. This can mean daily, or near daily water changes.

As someone who breeds fish, I think live foods are best for conditioning if you can get your hands of them. Otherwise, frozen foods are the next best option. Are you feeding frozen bloodworms or freeze-dried bloodworms?

Going through Dexter's Youtube Channel, it looks like he lives in a tropical country? I'm not sure what the climate is like where you live, but unless your room temperature remains stable at 26 degrees Celsius or thereabouts during both the day and night, it would be better to invest in an aquarium heater. Sudden and extreme fluctuations in temperature are very stressful to fish. In larger bodies of water, these temperature fluctuations occur over a greater period of time, giving the fish time to adjust. The fish can seek out areas of warmer water (such as at the surface) if required. I only mention this, because stress in fish leaves them much more susceptible to disease. Columnaris being one such disease.

Unfortunately, without a clear photo it's very hard to make a definite diagnosis. Columnaris is also a disease I've not really had any personal experience with. I do think people use and recommend Seachem Kanaplex to treat columnaris, but I'm not 100% certain.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So which fish did you get first, the male or the female? If you didn't quarantine the newest arrival, there's always the risk that they will spread disease to your existing stock.

Personally, I do not like to see adult bettas kept in jars long-term. Jars are fine for growing out juveniles and sub-adults, but I don't think they offer adequate space for a fish to live out its whole life in. The reason breeders use jars, is because it's more economical. This doesn't necessarily mean it's in the best interest of the fish.

Furthermore, smaller volumes of water demand a higher level of maintenance. You cannot be remiss with water changes, as your fish will very quickly start to show the affects of ammonia poisoning. This can mean daily, or near daily water changes.

As someone who breeds fish, I think live foods are best for conditioning if you can get your hands of them. Otherwise, frozen foods are the next best option. Are you feeding frozen bloodworms or freeze-dried bloodworms?

Going through Dexter's Youtube Channel, it looks like he lives in a tropical country? I'm not sure what the climate is like where you live, but unless your room temperature remains stable at 26 degrees Celsius or thereabouts during both the day and night, it would be better to invest in an aquarium heater. Sudden and extreme fluctuations in temperature are very stressful to fish. In larger bodies of water, these temperature fluctuations occur over a greater period of time, giving the fish time to adjust. The fish can seek out areas of warmer water (such as at the surface) if required. I only mention this, because stress in fish leaves them much more susceptible to disease. Columnaris being one such disease.

Unfortunately, without a clear photo it's very hard to make a definite diagnosis. Columnaris is also a disease I've not really had any personal experience with. I do think people use and recommend Seachem Kanaplex to treat columnaris, but I'm not 100% certain.
My room remains at a solid 26C, it's the hottest room in my house, so I guess that will be ok. I can't afford all those heaters and small tanks, I was planning to breed them and sell them off so I can buy better stuff for them.

Even with a photo you wouldn't be able to diagnose her, you only see it at certain angles and it's very hard to see, it's like tiny white fluff on her top body, there's two spots of them.

So again, will changing the water daily stress her to the point she'll die? I've added some aquarium friendly salt to possibly help, and tomorrow I'm going out to get some anti bacterial stuff for her. Would Aquasonic Bactonex help? It says prevent not cure, so I'm not sure.

Also Dexter said it wasn't entirely bad for the fish to be in those jars, if I find the video where he says that I'll send it to you, I don't know if his facts are right or not though.
 
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