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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a ten gallon tank with one male Betta who is a nice boy and has been getting along really well with 4 neon tetras, 3 platies and 3 corys.

Today I went to the fish store to get some more corys and while doing so, one of the girls working there, who seemed to know what she was talking about, suggested a female Betta for my male. I had previously read this was a no go but she assured me it's fine and I decided to give it a go.

I'm sure you can all guess where this is going.

Well, he's showing aggressive signs. I've been watching them for the past hour and now and then he'll swim up to her and puff himself out and just glare at her for awhile, then swims away. He hasn't chased her yet and over time he's puffing up at her less often.

I know this is probably going to only get worse from what I've read. She has a lot of hiding places for the meantime but I think I need to get her out before they both become too stressed and potentionally lose one.

But I have a problem... My other tank doesn't have a heater and I'm living at the bottom of New Zealand. So I can't just put her in there can I? Plus I haven't tested the PH in that tank because it only has snails in it at the moment.

What do I do..
 

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I would separate them immediately. Is there any way you could float her in his tank in a tupperware or something like that to keep her warm until you can get heater for the second tank?
 

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Shame the fish store employee gave you such bad advice, but it's fortunate you realised the potential danger.

I agree that separating them immediately would be the best course of action. Floating the female in a container in the 10 gallon tank means she is separate, but still benefiting from the heated water. I would recommend a divider, but you have other fish in the tank that really need the space a full 10 gallons offers.

Also I would have advised quarantining any new fish that are going into your 10 gallon, but it sounds like it's too late for that now. So just keep eyes on your existing stock as disease and external parasites can be introduced with new fish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have now got her in a floating container at the top until I source another heater. Thank you. And quarantine? So how would I do that? Sorry, I've researched, but don't have any other fish friends to talk about this stuff with and I feel the pet store isn't exactly helping. This is my first tropical tank, so all the help is greatly appreciated.
 

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I have now got her in a floating container at the top until I source another heater. Thank you. And quarantine? So how would I do that? Sorry, I've researched, but don't have any other fish friends to talk about this stuff with and I feel the pet store isn't exactly helping. This is my first tropical tank, so all the help is greatly appreciated.
Simple quarantine would be similar to what you're doing now. Either floating a container in your tank(and changing the water frequently), or even better, having a separate tank specifically for quarantine. I have a larger tank, so I simply float a 1 gallon jar in it when I have a new betta so that it's heated.

Pretty much, whenever you get new fish, they should not be in ANY direct contact with your established tank with other fish in it for a minimum of two weeks to prevent the introduction of diseases that could potentially wipe your whole tank stock out. That time also gives you the chance to spot any illness in your new fish and treat them as necessary.

But as it was said, it's too late for that now. But for the future.
 

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Simple quarantine would be similar to what you're doing now. Either floating a container in your tank(and changing the water frequently), or even better, having a separate tank specifically for quarantine. I have a larger tank, so I simply float a 1 gallon jar in it when I have a new betta so that it's heated.

Pretty much, whenever you get new fish, they should not be in ANY direct contact with your established tank with other fish in it for a minimum of two weeks to prevent the introduction of diseases that could potentially wipe your whole tank stock out. That time also gives you the chance to spot any illness in your new fish and treat them as necessary.

But as it was said, it's too late for that now. But for the future.
+1

this also means that if you are planning to do the container floating in the tank option that you cannot use the tank water to do water changes. It must be fresh water.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't say that floating the container in the main tank is an effective means of quarantine. I imagine there would be a high probability of water droplets from the quarantine container coming into contact with the water in the main tank, and you could very easily cause the spread of external parasites and other harmful pathogens.

To me, the best quarantine set-up, would be a completely separate tank. It would have no contact with your other tanks, and there would be no sharing of equipment between the quarantine tank and your existing tank. You would also not do something like put your hands into the quarantine tank, and while they are still wet, go and put your hands into your other tanks.

The usual recommended quarantine period is two weeks. Some people do longer, and also de-worm their fish before adding them to their existing tanks.
 

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You can warm a bottle of water and put it in the other tank. Or just order one online.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't say that floating the container in the main tank is an effective means of quarantine. I imagine there would be a high probability of water droplets from the quarantine container coming into contact with the water in the main tank, and you could very easily cause the spread of external parasites and other harmful pathogens.

To me, the best quarantine set-up, would be a completely separate tank. It would have no contact with your other tanks, and there would be no sharing of equipment between the quarantine tank and your existing tank. You would also not do something like put your hands into the quarantine tank, and while they are still wet, go and put your hands into your other tanks.

The usual recommended quarantine period is two weeks. Some people do longer, and also de-worm their fish before adding them to their existing tanks.
It would depend on what kind of container you have. Mine has a pretty tightly sealed lid on it. And I don't pour the water out for changes. I siphon. No water droplets on the container that aren't from the fresh new water being put in. Separate tank is still ideal, but just as an alternative.
 

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Once you've watched for heath issues and such in her and she is okay. I would introduce her to him. My bettas have always lived together. It's all about the fish and their personality. If he is a calm fish, like my males have always been, he is probably flaring at her to attract and impress her. Not to harm her. What should happen is you will see her bow to him and they will swim apart only for him to repeat. Personally I like to do three females to each male In my experience with them the males seem to be slightly annoying with their flirting so having more females to distract his attention gives the other girls a break. However all this information is moot if the fish don't get along. This is easy to see because they will bite each other.
 

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You will find few, if any, long-time Betta keepers recommend males and females together. Most have learned from years of experience that it's a disaster waiting to happen and usually all or most of the Betta and tankmates are lost.

Male Betta in a sorority are in an extremely stressful situation which can compromise their immune systems and lead to illness of both sexes. All you have to do is search (especially in the Diseases and Emergencies section) and you will see a lot of people who've had entire male/female tanks wiped out by disease.

Unfortunately, most people don't recognize the signs of stress and are surprised when things suddenly start to go downhill.

To keep Betta safe keep the sexes separated.

Oops, forgot to say: Welcome to the Forum! :wave:
 

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On the topic of quarantine, I agree with LittleBettaFish. Quarantine tanks should be placed far away from other tanks to avoid any contamination. With my qts I wash my hands throughly before I touch them after touching another tank (and visa versa) and I never share equipment (filters/nets/cups/etc.) unless they have gone through the sanitizing process. May seem extreme, but the entire quarantine process can be ruined if a single drop of water from the qt enters the main tank.
 
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