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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I am using one of API's PH buffers (7.5) for my Betta tanks to stabilize the PH and alkalinity levels, and it works just fine, however, I removed my moss balls because the instructions said not for use with live plants. Does anyone know just how long I have to keep the moss balls out of the tanks? The Petsmart by me said to keep the moss out until it "buffers", which I assume means "stabilizes," but I don't want to chance it and have dead moss floating all over the place. Currently, I keep a 10 gallon container of 24hr naturally aged water, which I then add my various conditioners to so that I have ready water for changes.



Thanks for the help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just use some prime for the water and keep the plants. I would stop using PH buffers.

Hi. Can you recommend a product name please? I am not sure what you're suggesting. I use conditioners and buffers because my water is pretty awful and it needs it. So, I am hesitant to stop using the ph buffer unless there is an alternative that works better AND ALSO compatible with live plants.

Thanks.
 

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Seachem Prime with take care of chlorine/ chlormine so put a few drops in your aging water (I age mine for 24 hours). Live plants will condition your water also. In my opinion if your water is really that hard (or soft) you should get animals that like your type of water instead of dumping chemicals in your tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Seachem Prime.
Thanks for the product suggestion.

Fortunately for my bettas, I am very committed to them (especially since I already own them). So, while chemicals are lesser ideal, I am confident I can provide them with a good quality of life, even with my area's water problems. So, additional suggestions or information on lowering ph/alkalinity/water hardness that will work with live plants will be appreciated.
 

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I have the same problem with the water in my area. It's incredibly soft, almost no buffering capacity or minerals to speak of. If I don't use SOMETHING, my Ph will crash within days. I found this out the hard way when it crashed in my big goldfish tank & I almost lost her, her slime coat was coming off in strips & chunks. It was horrible!

I researched the heck out the situation & decided on a product from Kent Marine called Ph Stable. It only effects the Kh, not the Gh in an aquarium so you don't have to worry about the water getting too hard. It will also have no effect on live plants. I use it in all my tanks & my plants are all thriving. I cannot recommend this product enough.

http://www.kensfish.com/aquarium-supplies/water-treatments/kent-ph-stable-250-gram.html#
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you both. I will look into those suggestions.

@Matilda does the product you mentioned only work for soft water? Mine is super hard.
 

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peat moss in the filter,blackwater extract,indian almond or dried white oak leaves free of pesticides and driftwood are all natural ways to bring down the ph.always go natural unless you have absolutely no other choice.aragonite sand,baking soda and crushed shells are natural ways to bring up the ph.
 

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@exquisite. Sorry to respond so late! The product will work fine in hard water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
@exquisite. Sorry to respond so late! The product will work fine in hard water.
Thanks!

peat moss in the filter,blackwater extract,indian almond or dried white oak leaves free of pesticides and driftwood...
I am buying some unused driftwood from a friend, do you know if it matters how large the piece is relative to the size of the tank (most are 2.5/3 gal).

-----------

In other news, I did end up buying an API Freshwater Master Test Kit... WOW is it daunting. I tried to measure but I messed up one of the 2 step processes and I gave up for the night. I was tired. I will try again.

Anyways, I since decided to stop using the Salt and PH Buffer since I was informed that they contradict each other... I was also told that Bettas are capable of handling higher PH levels generally found in tap, so it was suggested that the PH issue was, in fact, a nonissue. Thus far, they all seemed fine from said change.



Thanks all/both of you for the reply/advice.
 

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peat moss in the filter,blackwater extract,indian almond or dried white oak leaves free of pesticides and driftwood are all natural ways to bring down the ph.always go natural unless you have absolutely no other choice.aragonite sand,baking soda and crushed shells are natural ways to bring up the ph.
Another good natural way to bring up ph is calcium montmorillonite clay. It will raise the ph, adds minerals to the water and most of my fish love to eat it, even my pain in the rear to feed threadfin rainbows. It's also good for cleaning up green water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Oh, and I'll add in that organically-grown Roobios tea (which isn't a tea-plant and is not caffinated) will help lower pH is you can't find blackwater extract or IAL.

Thanks! I am having a hard time finding IAL or pesticide free Oak Leaves, so I will be looking into Roobios Tea. Does it discolor the water?
 

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Yes. It turns the water a rich sepia/orange color. If you are in an acrylic-tank, I would not use it as some folks have said blackwater, tea, oak, and IAL stain acrylic. And only Roobios. Nothing else added to it be it caffeine or other herbs.

Good. Prime is your best friend and it just makes everything better.
 
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