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Discussion Starter · #461 ·
Still have some Anubias in the vases that I bought from APF back in the Summer.

One seller, who clones Anubias, told me that Anubias are true low light plants one of the few that will melt if the light is too high. I have a 12' Finnex Stingray spanning the 12" high vases and two 30' Finnex on each of the 20 long tanks. Wonder if that is one of the reasons the Finnex people told me to go with the Stingray instead of the Planted+? I gave them a list of my plants and they said the Planted+ would be too much and encourage the growth of algae. :dunno:

Did you tie them down? I have best luck either letting them float or using plant weights to hold them down. Don't know if that makes a difference, though.
 

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Wow o_O never heard of them melting THAT bad, then again, mine never melt, I have very little issues with melt no matter what I plant overall though, so I'm pretty biased (not even crypts!)
I lost nearly $200 in anubias back in 2014 when I first got into it. Had some stunning specimens including a massive anubias broadleaf, and stardust.. lost a whole tank of anubias to rhizome rot, broke my heart.


Still have some Anubias in the vases that I bought from APF back in the Summer.

One seller, who clones Anubias, told me that Anubias are true low light plants one of the few that will melt if the light is too high. I have a 12' Finnex Stingray spanning the 12" high vases and two 30' Finnex on each of the 20 long tanks. Wonder if that is one of the reasons the Finnex people told me to go with the Stingray instead of the Planted+? I gave them a list of my plants and they said the Planted+ would be too much and encourage the growth of algae. :dunno:

Did you tie them down? I have best luck either letting them float or using plant weights to hold them down. Don't know if that makes a difference, though.
I use a 13 watt cfl (60 watt equivalent) over the tank, closest anubias is 6" below at tip of leaf, lowest point is 12" away. I'm using the same light setup over my tanks with the older anubias (8g bubble bowl, 3g bubble bowl) same distance from light, same bulb/fixture, and not melting. All with salvinia minima floating at surface so diffuses light down even more.

My light is weaker than the one in this chart:
http://www.jeremysquires.com/img/aquarium/Diagram3.jpg

New ones I loosely tie mine to driftwood (allow room for it to thicken up) or if roots are long enough put a small rock over roots (not rhizome) to anchor. Older anubias is rooted in gravel so not tied/weighed down.

I'm assuming I just keep buying anubias with the rhizome rot disease and loose them from that.. my nose is forever clogged so i can't do the sniff test for garbage stink, but they show all the other symptoms of it (not when buying, but after they get in the tank).
 

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Discussion Starter · #464 ·
Just dropped the plants into the tanks. Haven't planted. But here are some of the Betta. Never really used a camera phone before. Took a while to figure out zoom and which button/whatever took the picture. I have even videoed when I intended for a still. So please disregard the lack of quality and clarity.

Plant Flower Flowerpot Houseplant Herb


Flower Plant Houseplant Flowerpot Leaf


Freshwater aquarium Aquarium Plant Aquarium decor Herb


Flower Leaf Plant Botany Anthurium
 

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I finally decided to start a journal. I thought i would start out with how I got into this hobby and what it was like early-on. I hope you enjoy my rembrances of things past.....Linda


Today’s aquarists are lucky in so many ways: Affordable aquariums, filters and heaters, a wealth of fish species from which to choose. Most have no idea how it was before any of the above. How it was before the Internet and Forums. When you had to read book by researchers and breeders or find a mentor with years of experience to glean information.

I began my aquatic adventures in 1959 when my Father used my 10th birthday as an excuse to get the aquarium he had always wanted. That birthday present cost him nearly $600 in today’s money. Now you see why he needed an excuse! As a Navy Chief Petty Officer his pay wasn’t all that great and we lived in San Diego, CA where the cost of living was high.

What did my birthday gift include? A 10 gallon Metaframe aquarium with slate bottom, gravel, a net, food, a ton of plants and three Guppies, three Mollies and three Swords…one male and two females of each. There were no affordable heaters for smaller aquariums and my brain has forgotten if it had a filter…but I don’t think so.

One of the tenants of long-ago aquaria was the “One-inch of fish per gallon of water.” This 100-year-old belief was developed when there were no filters to supply oxygen or maintain water quality. Although with today’s technology that rule no longer applies many still perpetuate it.

Speaking of plants: From the aquatic beginnings an abundance of live plants was a “must.” Even in the 1800s aquarists rightly believed that not only did live plants provide oxygen but they also maintained water quality even before the advent of filters. Ask aquatic experts and you will find many who believe some of today’s fish sicken more often than ever before because too many aquarists use maintenance-free fake plants and thus deprive their fish of the benefits live plants provide…which is why my birthday gift came with a lot of plants.

In 1959 there was no “instant cycling” bacteria. The aquarist did weekly water changes of 50% no matter how many fish were in the new tank. We didn’t lose a single fish during the “breaking in” of the aquarium as amateurs called it. As a matter of fact, we didn’t lose any of them in a cross-country trip to my Father’s final assignment in Florida. With no Interstates, if memory serves, it took a week; maybe a bit longer. Can you imagine? A week driving across country in a Nash station wagon with two kids (aged 10 and seven), a parakeet and an aquarium with nine fish?

My Mom carried two jugs for water and when we arrived at a motel she would fill the jugs. The next morning right before we left she would dip out some of the tank water and fill the tank with the water that had been setting out overnight. Back then you didn’t need “conditioners” because they didn’t add all that stuff to the water supply that they do today.

We maintained that tank until we left Florida for Tennessee in the summer of 1964. We gave it to a friend. When we reached Tennessee, we bought a 20 gallon which we kept until I left for my last two years college in 1968.
Wow! Wonderful history lesson. A 10 gallon was that expensive back then? Very cool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #470 ·
Thought I might start updating since I've made the commitment to either plant or place my tanks. I am down from 15 to four!!! Two 20 longs that are divided x 3; a 2.5 (will be mostly Anubias and dwarf Swords) and an eight (mostly tall Anubias). Still have four 5.5 and two 20 longs and equipment in need of homes. But, it must be local pick-up. I'm near Nashville.

I use NilocG Thrive Shrimp Specific liquid fertilizer, NilocG Thrive Caps and Iron tabs from Han Aquatics in the substrate. NilocG also has ferts specifically for low-tech tanks. Years ago a friend who raises, clones and sells aquatic plants told me all Swords/Echinodorus need Iron. It's not just for red plants. I took his advice and the results are amazing.

I have a few plants here and there: Hornwort, Baby Tears, Cardinal Plant, Willow Moss, Java Moss and some Anubias and stem plants I cannot identify. Also, pink Ramshorn snails in one 20 gallon and blue Ramshorn Snails in the other. And, Purple with black foot, Magenta with light foot and Ivory Mystery Snails. Plus some tiny Horned Nerite Snails that are too cute. :giggle:

On Friday I ordered from Buce Plants. More difficult are starred.

Anubias:
Long and Wavy, Striped, Wrinkle Leaf, Short and Sharp

Cryptocoryne:

Mioya, Hudori**, Parva

Echinodorus:
Red Flame

Ludwigia Natans Super Red** (the red stem plant that grows well for me)

As soon as he has all of the plants I want, I will be ordering the following from Aquarium Plants Factory:

Anubias:
Barteri Round Leaves, Butterfly, Coffeefolia, Congenesis Mini, Golden, Minima, Petite, 'Super" Petite (for the 2.5)

Cryptocoryne:
Becketti, Wendtii 'Green', Wendtii 'Green Gecko'

Echinodorus:
Yellow Sun, Dwarf Hairgrass 'Mini', Tenellus, Vesuvius, Dwarf Parva

Tiger Lotus
Banana Plants
 

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Discussion Starter · #475 ·
It's a 20. There's a filter in each section and a 50 watt Eheim heater in the middle. I'm upgrading the heater up to a 100 or 150 watt so it doesn't have to work so hard. I was surprised I didn't need a heater in each section to keep even temperature; guess it's the filters moving the water around so much.

I have another 20 on the bottom shelf that is a work in progress, too.

After the tanks are mature, I'm adding a dozen Black Bar Endler's Livebearers (all males), shoals of Ember Tetra, Pygmy Cory and Habrosus Cory.

Dividers are .25" thick acrylic with .25" holes so the Nano fish can utilize the entire tank while the Betta remain in place. The ones I sell are opaque instead of clear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #477 ·
If you are a DIY or know someone who is, they are not that hard to make. I'm not DIY and neither is my husband so I paid someone to make these.

If your 10 is a Marineland or anything other than Aqueon I can send you the measurements for a 10-gallon divider. The divider will fit flush so you don't need suction cups; makes for a cleaner look. However, these work on the bottom and under the substrate.
Blue Aqua Turquoise Plastic Party favor
 
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