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I would, but that's just me (I have a bit too much microbiology in my background) ;)
 

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With a background in microbiology, you must appreciate how futile sanitizing is - everything you try to remove from the tank comes right back again. And speaking of which - there were no signs of disease.... So what exactly are you "cleaning" other than the beneficial bacteria, which keep the fish safe. No where else in the fish keeping world does anyone consider starting over when a fish dies. It's just such a counterproductive practice.
Of course sanitizing a tank is futile ;-). My statement was due to 2 reasons:

1) I never saw the fish so I personally can't guarantee that he was disease-free at the time of death.
2) Even if the fish simply died of "old age" it is likely that some opportunistic pathogen (likely a normal bacteria present in the tank) gained a foothold in the immunocompromised fish and contributed to his actual demise (an analogy would be pneumonia in the elderly). My concern would be whether this opportunistic pathogen is now present in the tank in greater numbers than normal, which could cause a problem for a new fish that is already stressed from being acclimated to a new home. Of course, I'd be much more worried if the deceased fish had been left in the tank for a while than if he had been removed quickly.

Edited to add: Just letting a bit of time pass while feeding the bacteria with some ammonia should ameliorate the second concern.

I do agree with you and I'd say the most likely scenario is that everything will be fine. If I had any tiny bit of doubt about the true cause of death though (or the dead fish had been sitting in the tank for a while), I'd just sanitize everything, grab a bit of media from another tank, and establish a new cycle.
 
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