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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I purchased a new female Betta fish yesterday. I set her up in the middle of my male, and a new Crown male I bought yesterday as well. This is their current tank attached.

My alleged problem is that the female, so far hasn't been eating. I tried to give her some pellets (Hikari Betta Bio Gold) last night, and she wasn't interested in them. Neither was the new male I had purchased. I tried again this morning and he nor she ate any. I tried again tonight and luckily the new male managed to eat two of them (then got distracted by the female and didn't eat any more).

I assume she may not be eating from stress of the new home, since her tank is at ~25 degrees C.

I did I 100% water change yesterday (obviously) when I set the tanks up for them, and a 50% today (just to remove any toxins from the packaging she came in from the store). She, and he, had blown partial bubbles, which from what I understand means they're happy.

Any ideas why she may not be eating? I also tried giving her some Wardley Total Tropical fish flakes, but she ignored those as well.

Also - when is the optimum time for putting a female and male together to breed? I understand that a male needs a bubble nest, but how do you tell if a female is ready? Likewise, do you still do partial water changes when the eggs are in the bubble nest? I'd imagine so - just very carefully.

Thanks.
 

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Hello there!

Well, it's very typical for fish not to eat when they first come home. In fact, the boy in my avatar didn't eat for a whole month! No worries though, fish can last months without food; sure it isn't so healthy but they'll be fine.

Also, you talk about breeding, are you set up for breeding? Do you know all the work that is put into it and do you have homes for possibly 500 Betta fish? Jars for over half of them most likely will be male. Also, your female is a VT and the boy a CT, I highly advise not to breed VT and CT together, it makes a really horrible mix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply! That makes me feel much better. I wasn't sure if her not eating would eventually get the better of her health but I'm glad to know it's pretty normal, thanks for the information.

As far as breeding, I have a male VT as well - but from what I understand the VT x CT will result in most likely a VT or Combtail? I wanted to originally just breed them as a bit of a hobby - to give to some friends and family that like fighter fish. I wasn't so much thinking about selling them (since I know VT's are pretty much worthless). I do have some room to house all the other fish - and I was planning to buy some more jars - other than that I have a spare 18L tank, a heater and a new sponge filter that I was planning to put the fry in.

I've read that destroying defective fry is the best practice - but this is a tough one for me, since I'm not sure of the most humane way to do so?

Thanks a lot for the help.
 

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Combtail's are a little more tricky, you have to have the right combination. Preferably you want both male and female to have a 180 degree spread, Combtail's are supposed to have a Round Tail (variation of the VT) with small spikes from that. What you will most likely end up getting is maybe one or two nice Combs but the rest will be some droopy CT's with very little web reduction which is very undesirable from a breeder/show stance. I don't mean this as an attack to you and what you want, just want you to know is all just in case!

As for culling, this doesn't mean killing them all the time. You can just give away defective fry to those who can meet the needs of the fry. Sometimes though, given how bad the defection is, it might be best to euthanize them and there are many different way's to do this; clove oil being one of the better choices along with ice water (not gradual freeze but instant freeze).

You'll get a better response about your breeding options in the breeders section if you like. Even if it is just a hobby, it's best to breed your healthiest fish and those with the best form so you don't end up with a bunch of deformed fry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the information, and I didn't take it as an attack at all. I'll try my hand at it with what I have - but for sure I'll keep it in mind. At the moment there was a pretty limited amount of betta options in my local fish shop, but I'm sure it'll take some time to get everything set up to begin with so there's no rush. Thanks for the help.
 

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Glad you know pretty much what you're doing. Half the reason we have to explain so much is because people think breeding is a breeze! So, I'm glad you know what's in store for you and your fish. I advise to read some of the threads in the Breeding section in conjunction with asking any questions you have as well! I'm not an experienced breeder but from reading, I do know a thing or two ;-)
 
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