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Discussion Starter #1
I've been researching and expanding my knowledge on diseases and sicknesses for Bettas. So I'll know whats going on when my fish acts strange and such. I came across the "New tank syndrome" and I have a rather aching question. IF a fish has the "New Tank Syndrome" and you have a spare tank could you move that fish to the other tank so you can continue to do a "no fish" cycle for the tank that the fish was previously in?

I've been looking all over the internet for this question but I could not find it. I was hoping one of the Betta fish enthusiasts on here could give me a little insight. :) :-?
 

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Did you get your fish yet? If not, I would completely cycle the tank before getting your new fish. This way, you can avoid the "new tank syndrome" which is basically a tank filled with ammonia. You have a few options on cycling a tank. I usually go for the no-fish cycle where I get pure ammonia and I set up my tank with plants and everything before I start. It takes me about a week to get it fully cycled. There are a few other options too but I haven't tried the other ones yet.
 

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Well... Here's a scenario: if you already bought the fish and you were already trying to cycle the tank with the fish in the tank but the poor fish got the "New Tank Syndrome" after a week and a half of him being in it. Would it be best to transfer the fish into another tank so it wont get hurt by the toxicity of the water and continue the cycling with no fish? Or would you have to just keep powering through with the "fish in cycle"?
 

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Well... Here's a scenario: if you already bought the fish and you were already trying to cycle the tank with the fish in the tank but the poor fish got the "New Tank Syndrome" after a week and a half of him being in it. Would it be best to transfer the fish into another tank so it wont get hurt by the toxicity of the water and continue the cycling with no fish? Or would you have to just keep powering through with the "fish in cycle"?
The new tank will just give him "new tank syndrome" (unless the other tank you put him in is already cycled, in that case, I would)
New tank syndrome is just ammonia and nitrite poisoning from an uncycled tank. The fish will be prone to it no matter what new, uncycled tank you put him in.

The only safe way to do a fish in cycle is to monitor your ammonia and nitrite levels very closely and do many, big water changes to keep the toxins down when they start appearing. Which is why I prefer fishless cycling, much easier and safer

Have a read of this http://www.bettafish.com/showthread.php?t=507585
 

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I agree with Trilobite. By moving the fish to a new tank, you're only going to run into the same problem.

Testing the water religiously during the cycling process, and performing water changes when the parameters dictate it, is really the only way to keep your fish safe during the cycling process.

There are products like Seachem Prime, which can temporarily detoxify ammonia/nitrite. These can be a literal lifesaver if there is a sudden spike in ammonia/nitrite, and give you time to bring these back under control with a water change (or multiple water changes if necessary). However, IMO these products should only be used as a temporary fix, not a permanent solution, and definitely not as a stand-in for water changes.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Heh. Alright... I guess I have to up my 25% water changes (for the cycling) for my poor Betta. Alright, thanks. I just hope he'll survive it.
 

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There are products you can buy that will supposedly speed up the cycling process.

I believe (although not 100% sure) that Dr Tim's One and Only, and Tetra SafeStart, are two of the most recommende brands of bacterial supplement on this forum.

There is also Seachem Stability, but I had no success with this product, so don't personally recommend it.

If you are particularly concerned about your betta's health, these may be worth looking into.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, I think i need to help me get nitrite lower. but I don't think there's anything that does that besides cycling. My ammonia levels are a little low. I'll do more research and probably make a trip to the store to see what they have to offer because I cant do online buying.
 

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The only thing to get rid of nitrites and ammonia in an uncycled tank are water changes. What are the levels at the moment. Id be doing 50% every few hours to get them down to 0.

If he already has symptoms of poisoning you have to act fast, they can go down hill quickly and if they survive, permanent damage can occur.
Ammonia will ruin the gills and nitrite will ruin the bloods ability to take up oxygen
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I already plan to do daily 25% water changes every 4 hours everyday to make sure the Nitrite levels and Ammonia levels are down. Mind if I ask what the symptoms of the poisoning?
 

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Good to know youre keeping up with the water changes, if you still need to get nitrite lower just do bigger changes.
The fact that you even have nitrite means your cycle is about halfway complete

Ammonia posioning is mainly lethargy, clamped fins, gasping, ammonia burns and inflammed gills
Nitrite has less symptoms, but gasping and clamping are the most common. Its more secretive in its approach
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well, my betta fish has been slightly lethargic. But still reponds when I give him food or go up to the tank. What do ammonia burns look like normally? Also, I tried to do 50% changes but I felt like it stressed my poor fish too much..
 

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You could try dripping the water in slowly like I do for my fry if hes senstive about it. Basically have a bucket of new water and an air hose that has a knot tied in it, start a siphon and the new water will drip in slowly, allowing him to get used to the new parameters gently. This also means you can just do ,less but bigger (90%) changes, because you need to get those toxins out as quickly as possible
 

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Discussion Starter #18
So I did a large wc with the drip technique you said about. My betta seems okay with it but I still have a little Nitrite in the water... Anymore tips? Or just keep up with the cycling?
 

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Glad to know he was ok with the water change :-D. If you still have nitrite do another one ;-). How much nitrite is left?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Its like a little over .50 But the ammonia levels are still 0. I plan to do another wc again (after my jog). Debating if I should do another 50% again or just a 25%.
 
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