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I just bought my son a betta fish a few days ago, I bought a one gallon tank for him, despite the guy trying to sell me a tiny bowl. He's a veil tail, (the one in the picture is the guy who died the first day. He was a halfmoon I think.) he has two artificial plants and a fake submarine. I treated the water with conditioner, he doesn't have a filter or a heater. I've been feeding him about 4 pellets twice a day but he seems to still want more. He's a hungry little guy, but I don't want to overfeed him. I really had no idea that bettas came with any real maintenance except the occasional water change and feeding. After reading through this site I feel bad for not looking anything up before we bought him. The guy at the store said it was the most easy low maintenance fish I could get. I'm planning on getting him a bigger tank this weekend, maybe with a built in filter? I really have no idea, all I know is that he is very active and has a lot of personality. Well... for a fish. lol He definitely needs more room to swim around. I was reading that adding aquarium salt may help him for getting sick? Should I be doing that? I can't have this little guy die on me or my son will be crushed. Should I feed him more since he's so hungry? Any suggestions would be great! Thanks!
 

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Salt shouldn't be added to a tank unless the fish is sick.

If your looking for a larger tank, a 5 gal tank is usually your best bet for a first time owner. They come in a 5.5 gal kit and it comes with a filter and hood etc. You will still need to purchase the correct heater however. And water changes are only twice a week, (although I'm guilty of only doing a once weekly 100% change). With a 5 gal you are also given the opportunity to complete the nitrogen cycle. Although not necessary, it is beneficial to your fish.

Also, 3-4 pellets twice a day is usually sufficient. :)
 

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Hi there - I'm new to Betta's but not to aquariums.
We set my 6 year old up a tank that's been going about 10 or 11 days now.

I know others that keep Betta's in small tanks will chime in and help you keep him healthy in the one gallon bowl - so don't panic.

We chose a 5 gallon Hawkeye tank from walmart.com (my stores didn't have it - so ordered online). It came with a filter, hood and a compact flouresent bulb.
My daughter picked gravel at PetSmart.
We ordered some silk plants (gentler on their fins than plastic plants).

From Foster & Smith (great online retailer of pet stuff) we got a heater (Hydro-Theo 25 watt), a thermometer (to verify heater is ok and not frying fish), also I got some Dr Tim's one and only and Prime...maybe some other goodies too.

Prime is a water conditioner that removes chlorine and other nasties from your tap water. It is also one of very few water conditioners that will help lock up ammonia (which is the bad stuff that comes from your fish pee/poop and is sometimes in your tap water anyway).
Dr Tim's is the 'beneficial bacteria' that helps breakdown fish waste....you can look at the stickies about cycling and ask questions.

I don't think you need to run out and go crazy.
You could get a tank that you like that is 5 gallons or so, hood, filter and heater, thermometer and set it up with water and get it going for a day or two before moving your fish to that tank.
I would recommend the Prime - I've always used it in any fresh or saltwater tank we've had. You might like to get that sooner rather than later - it will help that one gallon you have.

The Dr Tims - read, research and learn about cycling and the good bacteria - then come back and ask more questions.

Even if you get a 5 gallon you'll have to either cycle it or do more frequent water changes (which you probably already are in the one gallon).

Ask questions and keep reading here!
 
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