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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi everyone!

I'm really worried right now because I just noticed that my betta fish (Horatio) is missing a huge chunk of his fin. I'm not sure when this started happening but I had him since mid-September of this year and this is really recent. I'm not sure if it's the log in his tank... but I had that the first day he was there so it shouldn't? :cry:

Can anyone let me know if this is fin rot or him biting? And if it's biting, how can I help him so he won't be so naughty! And if it's fin rot, please let me know how to treat it. I read about using aquarium salt.

Another thing is, when I last changed the water, I accidentally forgot to prime my water so I poured tap water into the tank half way and then realized my mistake and prime both the tank and my remaining water to pour in.

Housing:
How many gallons is your tank? 5 gallons; Fluval Spec V
Does it have a filter? Yes. Filter that came with the tank, using Seachem Purigen
Does it have a heater? Yes. Aqueon Submersible heater
What temperature is your tank? 82 F
Does your tank have an air stone or other type of aeration? No
Does your Betta have tank mates? What kind? None

Food:
What food brand do you use? Hikari Brine Shrimp and Bloodworms (as treats)
Do you feed flakes or pellets? No
Freeze-dried? Yes. I pre-soak them before feeding
How often do you feed your Betta? How much? Twice a day, Mon-Fri. 4-5 tiny little pieces of brine shrimp (it comes in a chunk that I have to break off)

Maintenance:
Before your Betta became ill how often did you perform a water change? Usually once a week
What percentage of water did you change? ~90%
Do you vacuum the substrate or just dip out water? Vacuum the gravels
What additives do you use? Seachem Prime
- I also clean out the silk plant and such with treated water

Water Parameters:
What are your water parameters? Please give exact numbers. If tested by pet store please get exact numbers. "Fine" or "Safe" won't help us help you.

Note: I tried cycling this tank before putting him in but after a month of doing it, it still wasn't cycled... so I gave up and decided on a non-cycled tank. Also, my last water change was November 20th.

Ammonia: 0 ppm
Nitrite: 0 ppm
Nitrate: 0 ppm
pH: 6.6
Hardness (GH): N/A
Alkalinity (KH): N/A

Symptoms and Treatment:
When did you first notice the symptoms? Today (Dec 3, 2015)
How has your Betta’s appearance changed? No, except the fins missing :(
How has your Betta’s behavior changed? Not noticing anything. He is still at the top of the tank blowing little bubbles and eating
Is your Betta still eating? Yes, still actively eating
Have you started treating your Betta? If so, how? No. I need to figure out if this is just him biting or fin rot.
Does your Betta have any history of being ill? Not that I know of since I bought him.
How long have you owned your Betta? Was he or she a rescue? Bought it from Petco in mid-Sept of this year

Here's before and after pictures:

BEFORE:


AFTER:




Thank you!!
 

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Aw poor boy! My vote is for fin rot, but don't believe me just yet. I'll wait until more people throw their 2 cents in.
 

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Fin biting with fin irritation that causes them to look a little stiff. To help avoid infection, us Aquarium Salt indefinitely at 1 teaspoon per 5 gallons of water. You'll want to dissolve it first and add it slowly over a period of time (15-20 mins is fine). This will help not only sterilize his wounds but to help alleviate kidney stress as well which is pretty important! You can keep him in that forever, or do a big water change to take most of it out when you're ready!

Can you show us the whole tank and how it looks? Looks like he doesn't quite have enough silk plants to make him feel secure! It's the most common reason they bite other than light being too bright, but of course, more silk plants cures that too :)

How to tell the difference: Fin Rot NEVER advances that quickly. Fin Biting happens in moments or overnight or in a day, it's quick usually. Also, he has no bloody red or blackened tips either which is indicative of fin rot. Just stiff fins.

Also, do you feed him a regular pellet as well? I assume that you are feeding frozen foods by the brand and the way you describe it? Even though frozen is great, he can still use a good pellet like New Life Spectrum or Omega One. Make sure pellets and not flakes! Flakes are too messy and they foul the water quality! But NLS is easily digestible and holds in other nutrition that he needs :-D
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Fin biting with fin irritation that causes them to look a little stiff. To help avoid infection, us Aquarium Salt indefinitely at 1 teaspoon per 5 gallons of water. You'll want to dissolve it first and add it slowly over a period of time (15-20 mins is fine). This will help not only sterilize his wounds but to help alleviate kidney stress as well which is pretty important! You can keep him in that forever, or do a big water change to take most of it out when you're ready!

Can you show us the whole tank and how it looks? Looks like he doesn't quite have enough silk plants to make him feel secure! It's the most common reason they bite other than light being too bright, but of course, more silk plants cures that too :)

How to tell the difference: Fin Rot NEVER advances that quickly. Fin Biting happens in moments or overnight or in a day, it's quick usually. Also, he has no bloody red or blackened tips either which is indicative of fin rot. Just stiff fins.

Also, do you feed him a regular pellet as well? I assume that you are feeding frozen foods by the brand and the way you describe it? Even though frozen is great, he can still use a good pellet like New Life Spectrum or Omega One. Make sure pellets and not flakes! Flakes are too messy and they foul the water quality! But NLS is easily digestible and holds in other nutrition that he needs :-D
Thank you so so much for explaining! I'm so glad it's not fin rot, but sad that he is biting his fin >:[

I will start the Aquarium salt process tomorrow. The tank is in my office so I will have to wait till tomorrow afternoon to grab the salt. Is it a good idea to do a 90% water change before adding the salt in? It's because it's due for a water change anyway so I was thinking of doing that before adding the salt.

To clarify on the salt process, you said add it over a period of time, do you mean to add a little bit every 15-20 mins or within that 15-20 min period that I should have all of them in the tank? (Thanks in advance!)

As to my tank, I do have the light turned on during the day (9am - 5pm)...maybe I should set it to the night setting or turn off the light earlier.

I also have a fake hollowed out wood in the middle with silk plants, as well as 4 other individual silk plants. Here's the picture of the tank:



Regarding the food, I do not feed him pellets because my last betta fish died and I think it's because I overfed him with the pellet. The pellets swell up in his stomach and caused coning. I was too inexperienced then to know what I was doing. The brine shrimp and bloodworm that I use is freeze-dried and not frozen. Here's how it looks like:



I then chip little bits away and soak it in the water so that they swell up and I could measure how much I should give him.

Should I get pellets as well? I feed Horatio brine shrimp twice a day from monday-thursday. And on Friday, I would give him bloodworms instead as a weekend treat.
 

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Ah, no, his death wasn't due to overfeeding. Pineconing is due to organ failure. Most of the time an organ fails due to genetics or an infection, not to over feeding. And as long as you soak them then they're okay but he still needs a good pellet if you can find the NLS or Omega One.

Time the lights are on sounds good though, you can experiment though if you want to turn it off earlier or anything.

And the 15-20 minutes all the salt would be in by then. :)

And tank looks good, he would appreciate some taller plants though at the surface to break up the light on him as well. I know we aren't all made of money of course so just try to get them when you can, all silk of course, no plastics :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ah, no, his death wasn't due to overfeeding. Pineconing is due to organ failure. Most of the time an organ fails due to genetics or an infection, not to over feeding. And as long as you soak them then they're okay but he still needs a good pellet if you can find the NLS or Omega One.

Time the lights are on sounds good though, you can experiment though if you want to turn it off earlier or anything.

And the 15-20 minutes all the salt would be in by then. :)

And tank looks good, he would appreciate some taller plants though at the surface to break up the light on him as well. I know we aren't all made of money of course so just try to get them when you can, all silk of course, no plastics :)

Ah, I see! I will try to find NLS or Omega One pellets tomorrow as well as some tall silk plants when shopping for the salt :)

Another thing I was thinking is to replace my fake log and buy a driftwood... I saw this:

Link to driftwood

Do you think this is appropriate?

I also saw people buy floating logs. I'm not sure if I need it or not.

Link to floating log

Thank you so much for all of your information! This really helps! :-D
 

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Great! I'm always glad to help out!

If you go with driftwood, go with regular Mopani or Malaysian. That Cholla is great too but not with the moss on it. What happens with that kind of mat is it get's insanely dirty and allows for a build up of mold and mulm under it. Instead, go with the plain wood and then you can add Java Moss on it instead if you like that effect, just stay away from putting Marimo balls (that's what that is) on wood, it ends badly unfortunately even though it's very beautiful for a while. Java Moss doesn't do the same thing that the Marimo algae will, there is a specific build up under the algae and I can't for the life of me remember what it's called right now >.< RussellTheShihTzu knows though, if you're curious about it, PM her!

And sure! If you'd like to use the floating log, that's up to you! Definitely get the silk plants first though or if you have money left over you can absolutely get that as well! Some fish use them and some don't, I've had both types of fish lol. But the plants are always used directly or indirectly. As I keep explaining to my (not so bright) professor; the more plants you have, the more your fish will actually be out and about because he knows that he's safe and has a good place to hide if something should spook him! :-D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Great! I'm always glad to help out!

If you go with driftwood, go with regular Mopani or Malaysian. That Cholla is great too but not with the moss on it. What happens with that kind of mat is it get's insanely dirty and allows for a build up of mold and mulm under it. Instead, go with the plain wood and then you can add Java Moss on it instead if you like that effect, just stay away from putting Marimo balls (that's what that is) on wood, it ends badly unfortunately even though it's very beautiful for a while. Java Moss doesn't do the same thing that the Marimo algae will, there is a specific build up under the algae and I can't for the life of me remember what it's called right now >.< RussellTheShihTzu knows though, if you're curious about it, PM her!

And sure! If you'd like to use the floating log, that's up to you! Definitely get the silk plants first though or if you have money left over you can absolutely get that as well! Some fish use them and some don't, I've had both types of fish lol. But the plants are always used directly or indirectly. As I keep explaining to my (not so bright) professor; the more plants you have, the more your fish will actually be out and about because he knows that he's safe and has a good place to hide if something should spook him! :-D
Hahaha thank you! :yourock: I will definitely get more plants today :)

Great insight on the driftwood. I would've never known and would've wasted all that money! I do want some driftwood but I need to do more research on live plants. I know nothing about it! Don't I need substrate instead of gravel if I want plants (even on the driftwood)? I'm so clueless on this. :-?
 

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Hahaha thank you! :yourock: I will definitely get more plants today :)

Great insight on the driftwood. I would've never known and would've wasted all that money! I do want some driftwood but I need to do more research on live plants. I know nothing about it! Don't I need substrate instead of gravel if I want plants (even on the driftwood)? I'm so clueless on this. :-?
Fantastic! :-D

And nope, plants can go in anything! Heck, all stem plants and even some rosette (swords) plants can float if you really wanted to lol. I've had plants in everything; gravel, soil based with sand, regular sand, sand mixed with FloraMax. Also, Substrate includes everything; sand, soil, gravel, marbles even, glass balls, it's just whatever is on the floor of the tank. What you're thinking about is 'enhanced' substrate which is complete BS for the most part. Yes, they do help but they aren't going to magically make plants grow. Most 'enhanced' substrates are only clay based, clay is fantastic for plants with lots of roots (like an Amazon Sword) because it provides more surface for the roots to cling to and helps red plants stay red. But enhanced substrate is not the same thing as doing a soil-based tank which is what a Natural Planted Tank (NPT) is; basically it shouldn't need anything extra as far as fertilizers if you go that route. But that's a big step.

You can start off with some really easy plants if you want to get into live plants. Here are a couple for you to google if you like: Java Moss, Anubias, Java Fern, Amazon Sword, Cabomba, Hornwort, Water Wisteria, Water Sprite, Ludwigia Repens, Green Cryptocoryne.

There are different type of plants in the fact that most easy plants will be Stem plants meaning they grow from a single stem and have leaves off that. Those plants can be cut anywhere on the stem and the top can be replanted again to grow more! Some stems are: Cabomba, Hornwort, Water Wisteria, Foxtail, Ludwigia Repens, Rotala Indica.

Another common type is Rosette plants, they grow from a single crown and have leaves off of that. These type will have a stem that grows out that throws off babies or sometimes the crowns will split and grow another plant from that, once it's big enough; you can split them from each other and replant each of them. Examples: Amazon Sword, Rosette Sword, Blyxa Japonica (hard), Ozelot Sword, all Cryptocorynes

Carpet plants are usually a little harder to maintain and so you may not see many around but they are very similar to Rosette plants in care except that they will be more like grass where they send out shoots throughout the substrate to make something similar to a lawn. Examples: Dwarf Hairgrass, Microsword (not actually a sword), Glosso, M. Minuta, Giant Hairgrass.

Another type is Rhizome plants; these will be some of the easier plants. The rhizome is a stick like thing where the roots come out of on the bottom and leaves from the top. They can be split anywhere on the rhizome to get multiple plants; some plants will also grow new plants off of the leaves as well. One BIG thing with these guys though, they cannot be buried in the substrate, they need to be attached to something such as driftwood or an ornament. The roots can be buried if they are long enough but the Rhizome HAS to stay above the substrate or it will suffocate. Examples: Anubias, Java Fern, Bolbitis Fern (kind of hard). The first two will be your easiest plants and the ones you'd like to start off with since they're hard to kill!

Last common type are Floaters. Super easy usually, they are fantastic at sucking up excess ammonia and nitrate which help keep your fish safe as well! Most will have long roots that Betta's love to sleep in or swim through! They help dull down light as well. Examples: Duckweed (I do not recommend, it really is a WEED), Salvinia Minima, Frog-Bit, Dwarf Water Lettuce, floating water sprite (broad leaf water sprite), hornwort (does prefer to be floated).

Now that you know the plant types, I can explain how they feed. This is a little easier I feel. There are two types of ways to feed: through the water column (leaves), and through the substrate (roots). For easy plants you may not have to use any sort of fertilizer but it's still good to know about it! Water Column Feeders would prefer to use Liquid fertilizers such as SeaChem Flourish Comprehensive (Excel is something different!), or API LeafZone (though, I do not recommend). Root Feeders prefer root tabs which are condensed dry ferts in a little tablet or stick that you poke into the gravel and they suck up through their roots! Each package has directions on where to place them in your tank.

So who uses what?

Water Column Feeders:
Floaters ONLY use this style of feeding.
Stem plants use this style primarily though, they will still appreciate root tabs.
Rhizome Plants will use this primarily, though they will still appreciate root tabs as well if their roots are buried at all.


Root Feeders:
Rosette and Carpet plants are heavy root feeders, though they will appreciate liquid ferts as well.

There is more about lighting as well but it looks like you have sufficient light for at least low light plants which is most of what I mentioned except those that I labeled as hard. Plants are categorized into two different categories to help us out: lighting and how fast they grow.

Lighting:
Low Light
Medium Light
High Light

Growth:
Fast
Moderate
Slow

These categories don't always exactly correlate to each other in the order I put them, for example; not all high light plants are slow growers. In fact, Anubias is a very low light plant but it's also a very slow grower comparatively. But that should help you when you look at plant profiles and how to read them.

Now that I've efficiently given you more than you can probably swallow at this time haha, let me know if you've got questions about anything I've mentioned here and I can expand on it to help you understand if you're having issues ^_^ These are just the bare basics of plant care for the common ones you'll see at the pet stores but there is much much more to it of course. But if you start off with those easy plants and ease into it, it's a much smoother ride. You'll still have bumps and plants can die for no reason sometimes, or seems like no reason at least. So don't get discouraged if you kill something! It happens to the best of us. Heck, there are still a couple plants that I can't keep alive for the life of me! You certainly wouldn't be alone ^_^
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Fantastic! :-D

And nope, plants can go in anything! Heck, all stem plants and even some rosette (swords) plants can float if you really wanted to lol. I've had plants in everything; gravel, soil based with sand, regular sand, sand mixed with FloraMax. Also, Substrate includes everything; sand, soil, gravel, marbles even, glass balls, it's just whatever is on the floor of the tank. What you're thinking about is 'enhanced' substrate which is complete BS for the most part. Yes, they do help but they aren't going to magically make plants grow. Most 'enhanced' substrates are only clay based, clay is fantastic for plants with lots of roots (like an Amazon Sword) because it provides more surface for the roots to cling to and helps red plants stay red. But enhanced substrate is not the same thing as doing a soil-based tank which is what a Natural Planted Tank (NPT) is; basically it shouldn't need anything extra as far as fertilizers if you go that route. But that's a big step.

You can start off with some really easy plants if you want to get into live plants. Here are a couple for you to google if you like: Java Moss, Anubias, Java Fern, Amazon Sword, Cabomba, Hornwort, Water Wisteria, Water Sprite, Ludwigia Repens, Green Cryptocoryne.

There are different type of plants in the fact that most easy plants will be Stem plants meaning they grow from a single stem and have leaves off that. Those plants can be cut anywhere on the stem and the top can be replanted again to grow more! Some stems are: Cabomba, Hornwort, Water Wisteria, Foxtail, Ludwigia Repens, Rotala Indica.

Another common type is Rosette plants, they grow from a single crown and have leaves off of that. These type will have a stem that grows out that throws off babies or sometimes the crowns will split and grow another plant from that, once it's big enough; you can split them from each other and replant each of them. Examples: Amazon Sword, Rosette Sword, Blyxa Japonica (hard), Ozelot Sword, all Cryptocorynes

Carpet plants are usually a little harder to maintain and so you may not see many around but they are very similar to Rosette plants in care except that they will be more like grass where they send out shoots throughout the substrate to make something similar to a lawn. Examples: Dwarf Hairgrass, Microsword (not actually a sword), Glosso, M. Minuta, Giant Hairgrass.

Another type is Rhizome plants; these will be some of the easier plants. The rhizome is a stick like thing where the roots come out of on the bottom and leaves from the top. They can be split anywhere on the rhizome to get multiple plants; some plants will also grow new plants off of the leaves as well. One BIG thing with these guys though, they cannot be buried in the substrate, they need to be attached to something such as driftwood or an ornament. The roots can be buried if they are long enough but the Rhizome HAS to stay above the substrate or it will suffocate. Examples: Anubias, Java Fern, Bolbitis Fern (kind of hard). The first two will be your easiest plants and the ones you'd like to start off with since they're hard to kill!

Last common type are Floaters. Super easy usually, they are fantastic at sucking up excess ammonia and nitrate which help keep your fish safe as well! Most will have long roots that Betta's love to sleep in or swim through! They help dull down light as well. Examples: Duckweed (I do not recommend, it really is a WEED), Salvinia Minima, Frog-Bit, Dwarf Water Lettuce, floating water sprite (broad leaf water sprite), hornwort (does prefer to be floated).

Now that you know the plant types, I can explain how they feed. This is a little easier I feel. There are two types of ways to feed: through the water column (leaves), and through the substrate (roots). For easy plants you may not have to use any sort of fertilizer but it's still good to know about it! Water Column Feeders would prefer to use Liquid fertilizers such as SeaChem Flourish Comprehensive (Excel is something different!), or API LeafZone (though, I do not recommend). Root Feeders prefer root tabs which are condensed dry ferts in a little tablet or stick that you poke into the gravel and they suck up through their roots! Each package has directions on where to place them in your tank.

So who uses what?

Water Column Feeders:
Floaters ONLY use this style of feeding.
Stem plants use this style primarily though, they will still appreciate root tabs.
Rhizome Plants will use this primarily, though they will still appreciate root tabs as well if their roots are buried at all.


Root Feeders:
Rosette and Carpet plants are heavy root feeders, though they will appreciate liquid ferts as well.

There is more about lighting as well but it looks like you have sufficient light for at least low light plants which is most of what I mentioned except those that I labeled as hard. Plants are categorized into two different categories to help us out: lighting and how fast they grow.

Lighting:
Low Light
Medium Light
High Light

Growth:
Fast
Moderate
Slow

These categories don't always exactly correlate to each other in the order I put them, for example; not all high light plants are slow growers. In fact, Anubias is a very low light plant but it's also a very slow grower comparatively. But that should help you when you look at plant profiles and how to read them.

Now that I've efficiently given you more than you can probably swallow at this time haha, let me know if you've got questions about anything I've mentioned here and I can expand on it to help you understand if you're having issues ^_^ These are just the bare basics of plant care for the common ones you'll see at the pet stores but there is much much more to it of course. But if you start off with those easy plants and ease into it, it's a much smoother ride. You'll still have bumps and plants can die for no reason sometimes, or seems like no reason at least. So don't get discouraged if you kill something! It happens to the best of us. Heck, there are still a couple plants that I can't keep alive for the life of me! You certainly wouldn't be alone ^_^
You are the best!! Thanks for opening up my eyes to live plants! Sorry for the late reply but I just finished setting up my tank with some new plants, fake and live! :-D

I got some fern that's connected to this brown coconut thing, some java moss on my driftwood, and the person at Petco gave me some floaters that I hope will help shield the light a bit. I also got two fake plants that are taller as well. One is also blocking my filter output a bit so the flow isn't too crazy now! :D

Here's the updated pics:





I also got a floating log, but decided it was too crowded for the tank so I took that away. Hmm, can't return it now haha. Will save it for my next fish tank, maybe.

Also, I'm not seeing him bite himself anymore, but I'm not seeing a regrowth either. I guess I just have to wait?

Thanks for everything!
 

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Super nice! The floating plant looks like Salvinia Minima!

Also, that's not Java Fern, that's Bolbitis, be warned that it may die or melt on you. Melting is the act of the plant becoming almost transparent like or literally looks like it's melting. Basically, the plant is just acclimating to your water and it may recover in a few weeks. It can happen to all plants but some plants are more prone to it than others. Bolbitis and Cryptocoryne are two of them. Bolbitis is also just hard to maintain in general. Sorry I didn't warn you before! I did mean to go over the partially aquatics that PetCo and PetSmart sell without telling you usually! Steer clear of Dracaena, African Fern, Peacock Fern, annnddd I can't think of any more at the moment. PetCo usually labels them as semi-aquatic but PetSmart doesn't.

You can return the floating log if you need to, just make sure it's dry of course and if you've got your receipt you're good :) But it's all good if you want to keep it ^_^

Yeah, it's going to take a week to two weeks before you start seeing any regrowth. With all his damage, it's going to take him many months to reach a full tail again but he should eventually get there!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Super nice! The floating plant looks like Salvinia Minima!

Also, that's not Java Fern, that's Bolbitis, be warned that it may die or melt on you. Melting is the act of the plant becoming almost transparent like or literally looks like it's melting. Basically, the plant is just acclimating to your water and it may recover in a few weeks. It can happen to all plants but some plants are more prone to it than others. Bolbitis and Cryptocoryne are two of them. Bolbitis is also just hard to maintain in general. Sorry I didn't warn you before! I did mean to go over the partially aquatics that PetCo and PetSmart sell without telling you usually! Steer clear of Dracaena, African Fern, Peacock Fern, annnddd I can't think of any more at the moment. PetCo usually labels them as semi-aquatic but PetSmart doesn't.

You can return the floating log if you need to, just make sure it's dry of course and if you've got your receipt you're good :) But it's all good if you want to keep it ^_^

Yeah, it's going to take a week to two weeks before you start seeing any regrowth. With all his damage, it's going to take him many months to reach a full tail again but he should eventually get there!

I love how you know all these plants name! I'm so clueless! :shock: Glad I can put a name to the floating plants now haha

And I don't think the moss that I bought is Bolbitis. I checked the images on Google and it doesn't really look like it. Here's a better picture of it:



And here's the other fern that I bought (I don't know the name of it :X):



The person at PetCo said it was a low-light plant.

I also never like PetSmart. PetCo in my area has a bigger aquatic selection and I find that the people there are so much more knowledgable than PetSmart.

For the floating log, I can't return it because I hastily threw out the styrofoam and packaging LOL! :oops: I'll just keep it for the future haha

Glad to know it takes a while for the fin to grow back. My poor baby! I feel so bad for him :( At least I know he's getting better!
 

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The second pic is what I was talking about. The "moss" ball is Java Moss, different from a Marimo Ball. :)

Yeah, it comes from having plants for a good three years now and helping people out all the time ^_^ I'm a veritable sponge haha.

Yeah, Bolbitis is relatively low light but it's still a hard plant to keep well is all. As I mentioned before, the categories of plants aren't all equal meaning that high light plants are all hard to grow. Some low light plants can be very difficult and some high light plants can be super easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The second pic is what I was talking about. The "moss" ball is Java Moss, different from a Marimo Ball. :)

Yeah, it comes from having plants for a good three years now and helping people out all the time ^_^ I'm a veritable sponge haha.

Yeah, Bolbitis is relatively low light but it's still a hard plant to keep well is all. As I mentioned before, the categories of plants aren't all equal meaning that high light plants are all hard to grow. Some low light plants can be very difficult and some high light plants can be super easy.
Ah! Thank you so much for all of your help! I truly appreciate it! :D If you don't mind me asking, do you think I should get a tank mate for my betta fish? I feel like he's so lonely there haha. I have a 5 gallon tank so it doesn't give me much option :x. I looked into snails, but it looks like they reproduce too quickly and might corrupt the environment. I had three shrimps (one ghost shrimp, and two cherry shrimp), but they just either died off or my betta fish ate them... I couldn't find the corpse. :x
 

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No, no tankmates. Betta's are not lonely so try not to anthromorphize them like that as many do--it can be dangerous to the fishes health!

Only a couple snails reproduce quickly; Bladder snails (often mistaken as Pond snails), Malaysian Trumpet Snails, and Mystery Snails if you get more than one. Unlike the popular believe, snails cannot reproduce by themselves, they do need at least two. Some snails are hermaphrodites (having both sex organs) like Bladder snails and Ramshorn snails; they just need two. Others have determined sexes like Nerite and Mystery snails. So if you just get one Mystery Snail or one Nerite snail, you have nothing to worry about :)

Yeah, Betta's will jump at any expensive tasty snack like shrimp! lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
No, no tankmates. Betta's are not lonely so try not to anthromorphize them like that as many do--it can be dangerous to the fishes health!

Only a couple snails reproduce quickly; Bladder snails (often mistaken as Pond snails), Malaysian Trumpet Snails, and Mystery Snails if you get more than one. Unlike the popular believe, snails cannot reproduce by themselves, they do need at least two. Some snails are hermaphrodites (having both sex organs) like Bladder snails and Ramshorn snails; they just need two. Others have determined sexes like Nerite and Mystery snails. So if you just get one Mystery Snail or one Nerite snail, you have nothing to worry about :)

Yeah, Betta's will jump at any expensive tasty snack like shrimp! lol.
LOL! Good to know. Will look into one mystery snail. :D
 

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First off, so sorry your boy is fin biting. It looks like you have put a lot of time and energy into his tank and it looks great by the way. One of my bettas was a fin biter and I tried next to everything to get him to stop, cramed his tank full of plants, lessened the lighting, fed him a variety, etc. and he kept biting. It was so frustrating so I know how you feel. Then one day, he just stopped. I still have no idea why but his fins have regrown quite a bit now but it is slow going. Hopefully yours will be regrown soon, he is such a pretty boy!

I also wanted to say what an informative thread this has been. I am new to having live plants so I have learned quite a bit and it has been such an interesting read! :)
 
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