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I was wondering if limestone could be used in a betta's tank to regulate pH. I know that limestone acts like a buffer, keeping pH at nearly neutral, in natural aquatic environments where limestone is the principle substrate. I'm just not sure how it would affect other aspects of water chemistry. Does anyone have any experience with this?
 

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I was wondering if limestone could be used in a betta's tank to regulate pH. I know that limestone acts like a buffer, keeping pH at nearly neutral, in natural aquatic environments where limestone is the principle substrate. I'm just not sure how it would affect other aspects of water chemistry. Does anyone have any experience with this?
Sorry to be the one to say this.

pH should never ever be messed with..

Fish can adjust to pH , However if its constantly changing it will send the fish into shock and kill it.
 

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I agree. Trying to change the pH of your water to "neutral" is going to most likely be a never-ending challenge--and one that may send your fish into shock and end in death. Unless your pH levels are just wayyy off the chart your fish will adjust to it just fine. The pH where I live is at least 8.0 and all my bettas and my parent's large community tank have always done just fine.
 

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If your buffering capacity is low, there are chemicals you can add with each water change that add buffering minerals to the water such as Seachem Equilibrium and Kent's R/O Right. You should use these products rather than limestone because limestone does not leach minerals consistently, and in all likelihood, it would cause the pH to fluctuate even more than it did before.
 
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