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Discussion Starter #1
I missed out on buying this betta but it's been the exact coloring/fin type (blue rim/hmpk) I've been looking for. I wanted to ask, would this have been show-worthy? I'm trying to familiarize myself with what I'm looking for. Aside from being an hmpk, what kind of category would this fish be?

I've been reading over IBC rules (there's so many!) and it looks good so far except I'm not sure if it violates the following:

Caudal branching greater than 2° (Minor Fault)

Anal fin fails to display extended pointed tip (Major Fault)

Anal fin rounded and not coming to a point (Major Fault)

Dorsal and anal-most caudal fin rays (“edge” rays) shorter than other caudal fin rays (so-called
‘rounded edges’) (Minor Fault)*

Lack of fin color on pectorals (slight fault)

Substantial bleeding of body color into fins OR vice versa (major fault)
*For the longest part of the anal fin not being twice as long as the caudal outer ray.

I also can't tell how many rays the caudal fin has.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Can a mod please move this to Pictures? I'm in the wrong category!
 

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I'm not good at judging but from what I know about butterfly coloring the more even the color the better, and the colors need to be even on all the fins. On that boy the blue is wider on the caudal and narrower on the dorsal and anal fins.


From the IBC Standards https://www.ibcbettas.org/upcoming-shows/standards/

"General Basis of Faults of the Butterfly Bettas
The principles which determine the fault levels found in this portion of the text are:
- For two band fins, the bands should occupy 1/2 the fin on all fins.
- For multiple band fins, each band should occupy 1/[number of bands] of the fin area on all fins.
- The dividing line between fin bands should be straight and scribe an oval around the Betta.
- The degree to which a second color intrudes, lack of crisp definition, also affects the degree of severity of the fault.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you, I was having trouble determining what category a fish like this would go into. So he would be a standard butterfly, correct? I liked the jagged bordering between light and dark, but I didn't realize it was considered a fault. Thank you, you've been most helpful. I'll keep looking for a blue butterfly hmpk that fits the guidelines more!
 

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He is not a Butterfly; he is a bi-color blue and white.

Note the definition of Butterfly Rainbo provided: Butterfly color distribution is to be equal. A bi-colored Butterfly is to be 50/50 on non-paired fins. A Butterfly with three colors is to be 33/33/33.

Hopes this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you, Russell! As a bi-color would the distribution of color be a fault?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I had read that bicolors have one color for their body, then another color for their fins. After reading more into the IBC guidelines, I can't tell if this betta's sort of coloring would disqualify it. The only bleeding of color I can find concerns butterflies, which you're right, this is not one.
 

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Please note that I'm not into shows nor have I read up on IBC specifications. This is just my understanding based on mere logic.

Butterfly is, to my knowledge, two or more color bands (not color bleed) Mainly on caudal. Though dorsal and anal are solid colored but caudal has two color bands, it's still considered a butterfly, though it would be disqualified in shows.

I would not consider the above betta a butterfly. The bi coloring on caudal looks more like color bleed than bands. Instead I would consider him as a "blue rimmed" betta - but the caudal ruins the "balance" of the pattern. He is, IMO amazing though. Because even his ventrals show blue rim.

To my knowledge, bi color is any two color - whether body-fin or other pattern. To make it into shows, the bi color pattern must be equal through out body and fins. Color bleeding will be faulted. Unequal/unbalanced pattern will also be faulted.

Nevertheless, he is a gorgeous guy. And IMO, paired to the right female, may produce a few show worthy offspring.
. . . . . . .
My assessment;
His body could be better. If you draw a line at the middle from mouth to tail, top and bottom should be fairly equal (bullet shaped). This guys top line (above the belly) is too curved while the bottom line is rather straight. Not sure if there's a criteria on body length - his body is rather long for a PK (to my knowledge, that's personal preference)

Dorsal is acceptable, though it could have longer front rays. His 4 ray caudal edges are rather rounded, not exactly "D" shaped, but 90° to body (which is good). His anal, . . . Not sure how to explain . . . Anal's bottom line should be a bit curved upwards and end at a point. His rather thin ventrals should not show protruding rays. They should be blade shaped, ending at a point.

If not mistaken, in shows, this guy would be classified as an assymmetrical PK (according to European standard - not sure about IBC standard). . . . . 4 ray assymmetrical dorsal, anal and anal longer than caudal.
. . . . . . . .

It's rare for breeders to sell show quality (SQ) in an open market. You'd have to have good relationship with the breeder. Bettas being sold will always have faults, either form or color.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I hope it's okay to post an update, but I wanted to add that I was able to buy that fish! I'm very happy, I think he's beautiful. <3
 

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Congratulations. He has a rare pattern

It's permitted to update your own thread. But resurrecting other people's thread that's over one year is prohibited.
 
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