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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I don't plan on breeding bettas any time soon but I had a couple of questions pertaining to it.

1. Is breeding and selling bettas profitable in the long run

2. I know that if you breed sibling bettas to much eventually their will be genetic problums but I was wondering why it doesn't cause anything when you first breed a sibling pair of bettas?

3. Is it easier or harder to spawn your fry in say a 40 gallon grow out tank compared to spawning them in 10 gallon breeding tank then moving them into a grow out tank

4. How much on average does it cost to breed bettas. At least for the first time since most of the stuff you most likely wont already have on hand or extra.

5. How long on average does it take to grow your fry to an juvie/adult age.
 

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I'm new to breeding so I can only answer a couple of questions....

3. Most people who breed usually use a five gallon tank. A larger tank does help with the survival of fry. You don't necessarily have to use a tank. A plastic tub or storage container can work as well. I'm using a container I picked up at target. It holds 8 gallons and was very easy to set up. Plus one perk is you can use it to store your breeding supplies when it's empty.

5. Fry usually hatch within about 2 days and learn to swim on their own after 3 days. At that point you'll need to remove the Dad. Bettas usually leave home when they are 2 to 3 months old(8-12 weeks) same age as a puppy. Though some don't leave the breeder until they are six months or even a year. I got my female when she was 2 months old and my male was 6 months when I brought him home.

If you do plan to breed later on you can get a pair at a chain pet store but keep in mind these fish are like a box of chocolate, you never know what you're going to get. Other options are getting a pair from ebay or aquabid, if you're up to paying import and shipping costs in addition to the actual price tag of the fish.

I've always got my bettas from aquarium stores. Usually those fish come directly from breeders. One thing is it cuts down on import and shipping costs also, you can always tell an employee what colors, markings or fins you're looking for.

Also, when looking for a male and female check to be sure they are good quality and healthy.

Hope this was of some help to you.
 

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1. There are some people who do make profits off of breeding and selling, but for the most part, being able to breaking even should be considered a success for a small operation. There are a lot of costs that add up, especially when you are just starting out. Based on other people's experiences, the majority of the money earned from selling fish ends up going back into supplies and upkeep. Plus, there is no competing with the commercial breeders that supply chain stores or the fish farms in Asia.

2. Long term line breeding = deformities would be too big of a generalization. The problem with a highly inbred line is the lack of genetic diversity. Since related fish come from the same background, they usually share similar traits, good and bad. By frequently crossing siblings over and over again, the variation in traits becomes narrower and narrow. Any anomalities in the line would therefore be compounded in the offspring. But the same rules apply for every pairing. No matter what type of genetic background your fish come from, you should always keep in mind what traits they may end up bringing to the table. Breeding siblings the first time in a line does not automatically exempt them passing on genes they both share.

4. Haven't bred myself, but upwards of a couple hundred dollars seems to be the norm.
 

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1. Is breeding and selling bettas profitable in the long run
Yes if you can produce lots of unique/ show quality bettas. But to achieve that is harder than it sounds - even if you buy show quality pairs from the start.

2. I know that if you breed sibling bettas to much eventually their will be genetic problums but I was wondering why it doesn't cause anything when you first breed a sibling pair of bettas?
Fish are genetically more tolerant. Some say bettas are safe to inbreed for 6 generations. As stated above, the more you inbreed, the more negative traits would pile up.

3. Is it easier or harder to spawn your fry in say a 40 gallon grow out tank compared to spawning them in 10 gallon breeding tank then moving them into a grow out tank
IME, it depends on the male. If you have a very good father of a male that feeds his fry, it is easier to breed in a 40g. But if you have a so so father or worse, a bad father, 10g would be easier to feed fry - not much space for them to spread too far apart. Most fry don't "look" for food, they eat what is nearby.

4. How much on average does it cost to breed bettas. At least for the first time since most of the stuff you most likely wont already have on hand or extra.
You can make it as expensive or as cheap - getting supplies from used or free (thrift (?) stores), using used plastic drink bottles, culturing your own foods, etc. Not sure what the high nor low is though.

5. How long on average does it take to grow your fry to an juvie/adult age.
Fast growers - 3 months. Average growers 4 months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for all the help and information everyone :)
 
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