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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Ok... so a week after I got my current male halfmoon, Cole he started building a bubble nest.

Checked with the place where I got my female, Myra and apparently putting him in a place where he can see my female causes them to well... you get the idea.

For the most part Cole showed interest but Myra mostly ignored him.

Well, one water change later... he built a new bubble nest and now Myra is interested.

From what I read online I did the things common with conditoning, I set them up in a way they could see each other and fed them frozen blood worms.

After a while Cole started flaring and showing off his fins.

Myra's come up to him a few times showing him the vertical stripes on her sides.

Long story short, I finally let the two of them swim together.

Myra waited under the bubble nest and it took a while before Cole noticed her. When he did he just circled.

For the most he just chased Myra and shoved her or if he got too close he would go the opposite direction.

Myra flared but mostly looked at him like... "I'm over here."

I think Cole was either afraid of her or didn't know how to react.

Anyway, I separated them and decided to give them a break for a day or two.

Though after I took Myra out, Cole started adding more bubbles to the nest.

My biggest concern was them snapping at each other so I'm glad they didn't.

Should I try putting Myra in a jar and leave her next to Cole for a while or what?

I've never done this before but did research on breeding bettas and found video footage on YouTube.

The store where got Myra had told me if I didn't breed her than her carrying all those eggs would become a problem.

I don't want anything to happen to her.

Would appreciate some tips for a scenario like this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Color results for this mix?

My current male halfmoon Cole is a turquoise dragon with butterfly markings.

He came from a breeder in Florida.

Myra, my female halfmoon came from a breeder in Thailand.

She's emerald green with red and blue markings. She also has gold markings around her gills.

As far as eye color goes, Cole is parti-eyed, one is half blue, half gold and the other is solid gold.

Myra's eyes are yellow.

If they do have offspring what colors would I end up with?

I've read both dragon and butterfly markings are dominant genes.

Keep in mind, I got both my fish from aquarium stores who buy their bettas from breeders. Myra is more skittish in terms of personality and Cole is more relaxed and not all that aggressive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok, so I checked with one of the local fish stores. Apparently I put my bettas together too soon. I've been told to set up the female where she can be seen but the male can't get to her and to wait until the white spot on her stomach gets larger. So I'm basically going to have to wait a few days before trying again.

Still, I'd appreciate any advice about this.
 

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There is no right nor wrong way to keep, breed, nor raise this species. What ever works for you is RIGHT. So in the end you will have to find what best suits your resources.

Placing female in a jar is specially helpful (mainly for female) when you are breeding in a small tank - like a 1g tank. It helps protect the female until the male is ready to embrace.

I do not recommend placing male and female where they could constantly see each other . . . not until you're ready to breed. But it is a good idea to flare them for some time during the conditioning period. If the female is afraid of the male, flare her to another female until she shows breeding signs.

If you are using a 10g and it has hiding places for female, you can release her at the same time as you put in the male. Yes, she will be chased and bitten but that's natural for bettas. So you shouldn't have separated them (first attempt) and let them do their thing.

Females that are ready to lay eggs but have no males to spawn with will either release unfertilized eggs or absorb them. She should be okay. . . . no need to worry about that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There is no right nor wrong way to keep, breed, nor raise this species. What ever works for you is RIGHT. So in the end you will have to find what best suits your resources.

Placing female in a jar is specially helpful (mainly for female) when you are breeding in a small tank - like a 1g tank. It helps protect the female until the male is ready to embrace.

I do not recommend placing male and female where they could constantly see each other . . . not until you're ready to breed. But it is a good idea to flare them for some time during the conditioning period. If the female is afraid of the male, flare her to another female until she shows breeding signs.

If you are using a 10g and it has hiding places for female, you can release her at the same time as you put in the male. Yes, she will be chased and bitten but that's natural for bettas. So you shouldn't have separated them (first attempt) and let them do their thing.

Females that are ready to lay eggs but have no males to spawn with will either release unfertilized eggs or absorb them. She should be okay. . . . no need to worry about that.
Oh, ok. Thanks. I only have one male at the moment. My other one sadly passed away from fin rot.:cry: I only separated them because I was worried about them snapping at each other. My female's always been skittish, she did flare at my male when I brought him home but a week later she was fine. They've flared at each other before and she's actually gone over to where he is and looks and shows him the stripes on her sides.

She's full of eggs but the white spot on her stomach is rather small, someone at a local fish store told me to wait until it gets more noticeable before trying to put her and the male together again.

Funny thing is when I separated them the male actually added on to the bubble nest and when I looked at this morning it was much larger than it had been the day before. :shock:


. I suppose I could put my female in the jar I use when I change her water and leave it where he can see her. But how long should they stay like that?
 

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The important thing is that the female is showing breeding signs. Both male and female should swim all aver their tanks in an "S" fashion - one following the other. Eventually the male will bite the female and send her to hiding. Once the female regains her confidence, she will approach the male or the male will approach her and the flirting ritual will repeat itself. This will go on until they are ready to embrace.

If you use the jar method, leave her in the jar for 1-2 days then release. The disadvantage of this method is female releasing eggs too early. Veteran breeders usually need shorter courtship period (less than 24 hours) compared to first time breeders (3 days).

When the female is ready to embrace, she will move slowly, head down and approach the nest. If she is still flaring actively, she usually is still in flirting/courtship phase. I never pay attention to the white spot under her belly. So I can't comment on whether it becomes bigger or not.

You need to determine when to cancel the breeding. Vicious males will kill females. So if your female is too badly beaten - motionless (not resting/hiding) on top or at the floor . . . . remove the female.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I get what you're saying, thanks. First time they were together she actually went under the bubble nest and mostly stared at him until he noticed. After that he circled her then when he wasn't chasing or shoving her if he got too close he'd panic and go the opposite way. At one point, he went under the bubble nest and showed off his fins and she just watched. After he chased her the first time, her fins clamped and she just kept looking at him like: "Hey, I'm still here." It's funny, when they're separated she'll swim over to where he is and shows him the vertical stripes on her sides. He then tries to show off his fins or starts adding more bubbles to the nest.

She looked like she was sulking when I separated them after the first try.
The male on the other hand seemed dumbfounded like: "What did I do?"

He's usually a calm and friendly betta.

I did find a fish store who'll take their offspring when they're old enough to leave home. I'd basically get a store credit which I can use for food and other supplies.
 

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Hi there,

My first attempt at spawning was similar to yours. Released the female into the breeding tank and the male just doesnt seem interested and keeps chasing her away from the bubble nest, only to keep on expanding his nest.

Based on some advice given from my peers, apparently the male was not ready, or rather he feels his bubble nest is not ready yet.

As i had quite a number of live plants for the female to hide in, I just left her there and at the end of the day when I got back from work, there were eggs planted in a bubble nest which had grown about double the original size.

female sustained some bite marks but she's recovering well now.

My opinion is for more in tank exposure between both bettas which will motivate the male to complete his bubble nest quickly.Live plants in the tank is advisable to provide the female with some hiding space and after spawning, also encourages the growth of infusoria which serves as food for the fries.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the tips. I got a package of hikari first bites which is made for fry.

I plan to try again probably over the weekend.

I'm afraid of using live plants only because the last one I bought was for my veiltail who later caught ick and passed away. I think it came from the plant which I took back to Petco. So at that point I figured silk plants were the way to go. There's a guy a I know who has some nice ones that are a dollar each, a far cry from ten bucks I saw at a more upscale store.

I'm thinking of keeping one and then finding homes for the rest. I'd love it if some of them get dragon or butterfly marking like their Dad.

Funny thing is I've been putting together a list of names, that'll make it easy for me keep track of who's who.
 

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Oh, I plan to pick up some silk plants, think adding those might help?
Like I said earlier - anything that suits your resources, and in this case, your preference is good. As for usefulness - anything that doesn't serve specific purpose is of no use.
Eg. - live plants for infusoria growth for first day fry food.
cave, stringy threads densely packed together for hideouts . . . . . etc.

Some breeders prefer totally bare tanks. No plants, no hideouts, nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Oh, ok. Should I be concerned if he continues to snap at her and chase her?

I had read it sometimes takes two hours or so before anything really happens.
 

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2 hours? That's quick.
With good hideouts where the male can't follow, first timers can take one week.

Just make sure the female isn't too badly beaten. . . . But from your earlier post, you said your male wasn't vicious. Only chasing her away and not attacking her. So your female should be fine.

BTW, by badly beaten I don't mean torn fins or even missing fins. What I mean is that the female is too weak to move. Attack to the lower part of the midsection causes more damage and can kill in less than an hour. So make sure the female can still swim away from any attacks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the tips.


Yeah, he mostly chased her or panicked and went the opposite direction. He did flare and snap at her a couple times but nothing serious.

He's almost 7 months and she's 9 months old. My guess the reason behind her being so skittish is because when I got her she was in a tank with her sisters and I think she's suffered some separation anxiety.


Looking at Cole today, I noticed he tried to fix his bubble nest which has pretty much broken up. Myra actually went over to where he was looking and sat there for a while before getting up.

Not sure what that was about.
 

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I haven't heard of a fish getting separation anxiety from another sibling. Dogs and cats get it, but fish is a new thing. It's a hit and miss when it comes to breeding bettas. Some go right for it, others are new to the idea and tend to miss the concept of mating. Like some advice, just try again when ready, some females tend to be uninterested in males and vice-verse with males. I would also try to keep movement down to a minimum and not invade their privacy as well. Checking on rather their fighting or not is what's considered, but mating is their privacy hour.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well, she was nervous the first week I had her and she kept looking like "What happened? where is everybody?" she eventually calmed down.

My only concern with leaving she and my male alone is in case things get out of hand.

I changed their water and just to see how they'd react I put him next to her. He showed off his fins and she watched. Then she showed him her stripes.

He flared and she did the same thing after a minute.

It was mostly a staring contest. I gave them a break from one antoher and he started to build another bubble nest.

I think they like each other to a certain degree but breeding is something new.

There's some tutorials on YouTube, so I have an idea of what behaviors to look for. In one clip the female helped her mate pick up the eggs at the bottom of the tank.


My male is a dragon halfmoon with butterfly markings and my female is emerald green, but she does have blue and red coloring on her fins. A few of her sisters had cambodian markings, but I don't know if she carries those genes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Put my female next to the male. He showed off his fins and she just stared.

Now she's watching him build another bubble nest.

Is this a good thing?

I'm assuming it is but just want a second opinion.
 

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She could be impressed with his home improvement skills for kids. I would let her have a go with the male and see what happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I'll have to wait till he finishes the bubble nest first.

Oh, I read before breeding it's recommended to feed the male and female food with a higher protein content. What does that have to do with it?
 

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You have to fatten up the breeders. The male will probably fast or only eat a tiny bit since courtship until fry are free swimming (if you leave male with fry he will continue this). But at the same time all this is energy consuming. So if the male isn't healthy enough, he might die of fatigue or bad immune system.

On the other hand the female may take a beating, sometimes quite severe. If she is in her top health, her immune system will help her through the whole ordeal.
 
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