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Hello! I just tested my water using API’s freshwater master test kit, and I noticed a disturbing amount of warnings on everything but the PH tests. I doubt it’d be safe for me to pour water with these chemicals in it down the sink, considering it would eventually end up in the environment, so since I’m confined to my house, what should I do with it?
 

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If you haven't done anything with it yet, you could contact your local waste management/hazardous materials company and see what they suggest. Or see if the API test kit has a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) that might have instructions.
 

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If you haven't done anything with it yet, you could contact your local waste management/hazardous materials company and see what they suggest. Or see if the API test kit has a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) that might have instructions.
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If you haven't done anything with it yet, you could contact your local waste management/hazardous materials company and see what they suggest. Or see if the API test kit has a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) that might have instructions.
Thank you so much!!
 

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LOL love the plant Idea... Never gave that one any thought myself but I just dump mine in the sink. I look at it this way, the chemicals used to test for whatever you want to test for can't possibly be as tough on the environment as Sodium hydroxide, Sodium Hypochlorite, and Sodium silicate. The last of the three being the "fairly" innocuous of the group, while the first two are unpredictably reactive to all manner of other chemicals that might happen to come into contact with them. I keep the little things like that at the forefront of my, albeit disturbed, mind because those three little stooges are most likely in one form or another being constantly washed down every drainpipe in the nation. OF COURSE, that is leaning well to the side of the extremes, and totally a blanket statement. Even if it isn't too far off plumb.
If I have something REALLY nasty that I know is gonna kill whatever it comes into contact with I do the only responsible thing. I liberally cover the nearest poison ivy, oak, or sumac with it. Normally to nil effect. lol
 

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I'd rather pour them down the sink than water plants with it, personally. If it goes down the drain it will go through a waste water treatment plant, which are designed to handle all sorts of contaminants to make water safe.

A potted plant may be damaged by the chemicals, and if you pour it on plants growing in the ground then it's contaminating the environment directly.

The amount of chemicals involved in these tests are quite small, and if they did not meet certain environmental and safety standards they would not be allowed to be sold, or at the very least would have large visible warnings about how to dispose of them properly.

Now if you were testing vast quantities of water daily- such as a public aquarium or fish farm might need to- then you may want to ask your local authorities about proper waste disposal. But the average home aquarium owner testing only a few tanks is fine.

If you are still very worried, you can try pouring them through a charcoal filter first (not one you use for drinking water, obviously). But I am unsure about how effective that will actually be. Or empty them onto paper towels, allow it to dry, and then throw away. Many chemicals become inert once they are dried.
 

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LOL love the plant Idea... Never gave that one any thought myself but I just dump mine in the sink. I look at it this way, the chemicals used to test for whatever you want to test for can't possibly be as tough on the environment as Sodium hydroxide, Sodium Hypochlorite, and Sodium silicate. The last of the three being the "fairly" innocuous of the group, while the first two are unpredictably reactive to all manner of other chemicals that might happen to come into contact with them. I keep the little things like that at the forefront of my, albeit disturbed, mind because those three little stooges are most likely in one form or another being constantly washed down every drainpipe in the nation. OF COURSE, that is leaning well to the side of the extremes, and totally a blanket statement. Even if it isn't too far off plumb.
If I have something REALLY nasty that I know is gonna kill whatever it comes into contact with I do the only responsible thing. I liberally cover the nearest poison ivy, oak, or sumac with it. Normally to nil effect. lol
I'd rather pour them down the sink than water plants with it, personally. If it goes down the drain it will go through a waste water treatment plant, which are designed to handle all sorts of contaminants to make water safe.

A potted plant may be damaged by the chemicals, and if you pour it on plants growing in the ground then it's contaminating the environment directly.

The amount of chemicals involved in these tests are quite small, and if they did not meet certain environmental and safety standards they would not be allowed to be sold, or at the very least would have large visible warnings about how to dispose of them properly.

Now if you were testing vast quantities of water daily- such as a public aquarium or fish farm might need to- then you may want to ask your local authorities about proper waste disposal. But the average home aquarium owner testing only a few tanks is fine.

If you are still very worried, you can try pouring them through a charcoal filter first (not one you use for drinking water, obviously). But I am unsure about how effective that will actually be. Or empty them onto paper towels, allow it to dry, and then throw away. Many chemicals become inert once they are dried.
Thank you!! I really didn’t consider how little the chemicals might impact the environment - I’m squeamish around chemicals and such, and I guess I processed the warnings on the bottles and stopped before I could consider logistics, lol. I’ll be sure to pour them somewhere once I stop being indecisive about this
 
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